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Thread: Using deadly force to protect your pet

  1. #81
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    Using deadly force to protect your pet

    I love my little girls to death! My wife and I have two Bischons and they are not pets, they are our babies (we don't have any children).

    I would take a bullet for either of them!

    I walk my girls with my .40 caliber on my hip in plain sight so that I may get to it if need be.

    Some of the residents around me have large dogs (German Shepard, Labs and a few unknown breeds) that they allow to run free and have very nasty temperaments!

    I will have no problem dropping them with a few rounds of Golden Saber if they come after me or my dogs.

    I could never forgive myself if some bully dog came and chomped on my dogs and I didn't stop it in time!

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  3. #82
    Charles, my wife & I are in the same situation,,,,no kids. So our two little Chihuahuas are our kids. Back in the fifties a neighbors cat attacked my 3 mo old Chihuahua puppy in our fenced back yard. 2 weeks later we had to put the pup down. That cat was carrying distemper and back then there was no cure for it.

    We got home from the vet & I went down the street & told the woman that owned it if she wanted to keep it she better keep it in the house cause the next time it came in my yard I'd kill it. About a month later I blew it's brains out with the 38 my granddad left me. Then I threw its carcass up on her front porch. She called the cops but they didn't do anything cause none of the neighbors saw me do it. Boy my dad wore me out for getting that gun out w/o his permission. But it was worth every whack.

    A few years ago I killed 16 feral cats in my back yard with a 22 single shot Stevens. I'm not having another puppy killed by those damned cats.

  4. #83
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    How this thread keeps going is amazing. Dog stories galore--that is for sure. If you have a dog or find there are dogs in your 24/7 life that are suspicious or dangerous, you carry bear spray (a lot bigger and badder than that little lipstick case they want you to carry with more distance ability), you carry a serrated knife with a bit of length, but you do not carry a firearm. If you can tell me that you can discharge a firearm at a dog that is charging you close up in the midst of people or is now on your leg or arm in a crazed frenzy and you can do this safely and effectively without shooting yourself or someone else--have at it. You start with the spray that will knock down a grizzly and at least with a serrated knife you can not only stab, if possible, but slice and dice in this close quarters frenzy.
    If you are at your home and look out back and see a dog attacking your pet on your property, not sure about use of firearm--a lot of potential for stray bullets and other accidents. Maybe a high power BB gun would be better or perhaps a 22. I have heard LEOs responding to pet attacks with a "wink in their eye" when it comes to using a firearm. Depends where you live and your neighboring properties closeness.
    Just saying.

  5. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by chiefpropellerhead View Post
    Here in Charleston South Carolina there was a news report this week of a pit bull that was roaming a neighborhood in West Ashley and attacking other dogs. One lady watched as the Pit Bull tore in to her weiner dog and killed it. The pit bull came out of the woods and attacked the dog with no cause. Then later on that afternoon the pit bull showed up in a park not too far away and did the same thing to another dog.

    The thought running through my mind was this. If that pit bull had attacked my dog for no apparent reason other than to be vicious I would have put an end to that problem very quickly. The next thought was a question that I would like to pose to you. If I use deadly force to stop a vicious animal from tearing into my pet will I go to jail for discharging my firearm in public?

    Yes, I know I need to research the local laws here. I would imagine that the City of Charleston does have ordinances against discharging a firearm in the city limits. Any pet owner that is a CWP holder and carrying concealed would certainly be tempted to protect their pet.

    I had a friend of mine, who was working private security many years ago, that got mauled by a pit bull at an apartment complex. He was walking by a gate at the back of an apartment and the dog broke its chain and jumped the fence and attacked him. My friend was armed but it happened so quick he was not able, or decided not to use deadly force. I am thinking that I would have fed the dog the business end of his .357 and pulled the trigger.
    The moral questions are, "Would you rather bury your dog and wonder if you should have defended it?" and "Would you feel guilty at all for ending the life of a dog that was killing yours?"

    Take the lumps if they come. You were protecting a life of someone that you would consider a family member and possibly protecting yours. When an animal first tastes blood... it wants more of it.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  6. #85
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    Or don't shoot the monstrous creature and let it go kill a child.

  7. #86
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    Using deadly force to protect your pet

    I could care less about the legal ramifications.
    If it comes down to it, I will blow the other dogs brains all over the street and not even bat an eye over it.
    My dogs are family, period. If another dogs tries to turn MY dogs into a pull toy (or lunch), its on!

  8. #87
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    An aggressive dog is out of someone's control be they on leash or loose in the neighborhood and potentially a danger to more than just your dog.
    There are ways to get them to back off, but those ways aren't preventative. There is only one method for prevention.

    And I am a dog person. I love dogs. I love nice, lovable dogs not unsocialized, dangerous predators.
    ...SCOTUS says we're right...You don't like it. I'm sorry you don't like it. I guess that's a problem for you. Some people don't like gays. Some don't like alcohol. Some don't like meat. ~michaelzwilliamson

  9. #88
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    The moral questions are, "Would you rather bury your dog and wonder if you should have defended it?" and "Would you feel guilty at all for ending the life of a dog that was killing yours?"

    Take the lumps if they come. You were protecting a life of someone that you would consider a family member and possibly protecting yours. When an animal first tastes blood... it wants more of it.
    I took a dog away from a neighbor who was abusing her. She was obviously a great hunting dog when she was young, but by the time I met her, she was old and jumpy from the abuse. She put my colicky baby to sleep numerous times, watched over both my kids like a hawk and once backed a would be burglar into a corner of the basement. She was well over 75 pounds and even helped me pull my 6000 pound truck out of the garage when it wouldn't start. One hell of a dog.

    The longest lasting effect of the abuse was that she would have to be retrained almost weekly. She had brain damage from all the abuse and would either break or slip out of her collar and wander aimlessly, running in circles mainly in corn fields. She was so strong she could break leather collars, stretch chains until they gave...etc. but she never forgot the kids or her self-appointed duty to watch over them.

    Two years ago, she pulled her dog house around until it broke and walked in front of a squad car. That was the only dog I would have pulled a trigger for.

  10. #89
    I once shot a German Shepherd right between the eyes as it was charging me. Guys discharging a firearm inside the city limits ordnances were generally enacted to prevent plinking with 22s or bb guns or to prevent a resident from breaking a neighbors window or shooting someone's pet cat. For the first or second offense they are generally misdemeanors which is punished by a small fine and carry no jail time. In order to be charged with it the officer must personally see the act committed or a witness must be willing to go to the city prosecutor and file charges and then must be willing to give testimony in court. Most folks aren't willing to take a day or half a day off from work to go court and testify.

    Something to think about though; if you shoot a dog there better be evidence that it was attacking a pet or a person or you can be charged with animal cruelty and in some states that can be a felony.

    I do know another officer that shot two pit bulls that were charging him,,,,,,1 shot each in the head from a .357.

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