Home Defense but keep child safe - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 28

Thread: Home Defense but keep child safe

  1. #11
    I agree there is no better wayto keep children safe around weapons than to teach,teach,teach

  2.   
  3. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnK87 View Post
    Read Cornered Cat - Storing Firearms Around Children and follow the links at the bottom to the rest of the articles for a good overview of safe gun storage and teaching kids about firearms.
    Wonderful link. I enjoyed reading it and this gave me a lot of things to consider beyond what I'm doing (particularly with how my children could handle situations that may involve their friends). Thank you.

    - Ceicei

  4. #13
    My oldest is not yet 3 so as long as I keep mine up high this is not an issue YET. I would however recommend as others have, heavy involvement, teach them safety, take them shooting, and the trick that seems to have worked for previous generations in my family, is to cure the curiosity by beating them to the punch. In my wife's family, the kids could look at or handle a gun ANY time they wanted, so long as they asked their parents, only handled them with their parents supervision, and always handled safely. This is exactly what I plan to do with my kids. At two years old my son had already been to the range with the family. we have a bolt action Savage MK II .22 rifle, and he loves to work the bolt and pull the trigger while I hold it.

  5. Child safety

    Your first line of defense is TRAINING kids are smart, they'll rise to the expectation. The second line of defense is SAFES, TRIGGER LOCKS, Etc.

    Not trying to be a jerk and advertise, but i'd like to offer members of this forum wholesale pricing on biometric, combination, and key safes.

    You pay the cost + shipping which is usually between $8-12 insured, I make $1 profit to keep the government off my back for my resale certificate as I am making a profit...

    Feel free to compare prices on Ebay, this is truly a good gesture.

    Biometric (fingerprint) gun vault: $250 + shipping model #GVB2000
    Biometic (fingerprint) MINIvault $238 + shipping
    Key/Combo gunvault $83+shipping GV1000C-DLX


    Please PM me on the forum or Email me at [email protected] please indicate which safe you'd like and your zip code so I can give you a quote.
    Add 3% to the total cost for credit card transactions

    Clear Sight Tactical, LLC is a legal business entity in Albuquerque, NM.





    MOD: Please advise if this is not allowed as i've read TOS and think i'm ok to advertise..?

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Carolina USA
    Posts
    1,450
    The most important thing you can do is satisfy their curiosity.

    You may be able to keep your own guns under lock & key. BUT! What if your kids are visiting/playing with friends and a firearm is found?

    I have a 9yr old and a 7yr old. Both my kids have shot/loaded/unloaded handguns, rifles and shotguns. They also have seen the damage a gun can do.

    Unfortunately; as a matter of fact, my kids have been exposed to firearms so much, they are NOT in the least interested anymore. They are completely indifferent to the fact that Mom and Dad carry guns for protection. They understand the reason we carry is to protect them and others should the need arise. But, they just do NOT have any interests in guns or shooting right now.

    They have been taught what to do if "they" or one of their friends finds a gun. (Unfortunately, this is a real concern.)
    My kids have friends whose parents purposely "try" limit their kids exposure by hiding; or otherwise ignoring their childrens curiosity. (These kids have a "Great" curiosity and seem to be driven to get hold of their parents guns.)

    I can tell you. Short of memorizing, then throwing the combination or key away, there is no place you can hide a key or the combination to a safe that an industrious 9 or 10 year old cannot find it. (When I was a kid I was able to find the key to our safe; and my friend whose parents sheltered him got my stepdads gun out a FIRED it in the house.)

    My kids know guns are NOT toys. (even BB/air soft guns) However, they are totally and completly bored by the thought of joining my wife and I; in our practice sessions. One day, I hope they will find interest in shooting again. But for now their mom and I will have to be content by ourselves. (There is hope though; we recently went to a gun show and my 7yr old daughter showed interested in a "Pink" wheel gun.)

  7. #16
    Hiding guns is the worst thing you can do. Let your son see and hold any gun you have. Anything kept a mystery is the first thing a child will want to investigate when you are not around.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  8. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by HK4U View Post
    Hiding guns is the worst thing you can do. Let your son see and hold any gun you have. Anything kept a mystery is the first thing a child will want to investigate when you are not around.
    I tend to agree with this. My kids are grown now so, for the moment (no grandkids), I don't face this issue. But my own kids were always around me, and thus around weapons of all sort, when they were growing up. We kept it very "matter of fact". They saw game that was killed and they saw weapons around the house (obviously unloaded). I also let them hold any weapon they wanted to while I instructed them on basic safety. No big fuss, just routine. I also made sure they understood that a severe ass-whipping would be in order if they fooled around with any of them if I wasn't around. Never did have to administer any a-whipping. Now, on the other hand, I did worry about their friends; but this is "gun country" and most of them lived in the same environment. I'm gonna catch hell for this, I expect, but I never did utilize gun safes or locks or anything like that. Guns were tools, albeit dangerous ones like power saws, was how I approached it.

    This was the way it was for me growing up. Dad had guns, me and all of my brothers knew where they were, but we never did mess with 'em. They were just part of the culture.

    Having said all this, I now feel that when the grandkids come around, guns are gonna be locked up. Maybe my brothers and I, and my kids were just lucky. The old ways aren't always best, I know.

    OK, I'm ready...let me have it...

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    MA, Away from the liberal loonies...
    Posts
    2,658
    The possibility of needing the weapon for self defense is real. The possibility of one of your kids finding it and using it on you, a friend, or themselves is very real. Teach them!!! Ignorance and uneducated or unchecked curiosity will kill people faster than the bullet. That applies to all things not just firearms. Read tips and don't be afraid to spend the money for a gun safe such as advertised above. Imagine you have to explain to your wife why they are dead...I can't imagine a more horrific trauma than the loss of a child. Especially a loss in which negligence on my part was the cause… If your intention is to provide protection for your family then do so both “from” and “with” the gun..
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    MA, Away from the liberal loonies...
    Posts
    2,658
    Quote Originally Posted by JJFlash View Post
    I tend to agree with this. My kids are grown now so, for the moment (no grandkids), I don't face this issue. But my own kids were always around me, and thus around weapons of all sort, when they were growing up. We kept it very "matter of fact". They saw game that was killed and they saw weapons around the house (obviously unloaded). I also let them hold any weapon they wanted to while I instructed them on basic safety. No big fuss, just routine. I also made sure they understood that a severe ass-whipping would be in order if they fooled around with any of them if I wasn't around. Never did have to administer any a-whipping. Now, on the other hand, I did worry about their friends; but this is "gun country" and most of them lived in the same environment. I'm gonna catch hell for this, I expect, but I never did utilize gun safes or locks or anything like that. Guns were tools, albeit dangerous ones like power saws, was how I approached it.

    This was the way it was for me growing up. Dad had guns, me and all of my brothers knew where they were, but we never did mess with 'em. They were just part of the culture.

    Having said all this, I now feel that when the grandkids come around, guns are gonna be locked up. Maybe my brothers and I, and my kids were just lucky. The old ways aren't always best, I know.

    OK, I'm ready...let me have it...
    Haven't you had enough already???
    Sorry, had to throw that in...
    No one can call it right or wrong. It’s the way things were handled in your house by your father & mother. You knew about them and you knew what they could do. There were rules and you followed them. EDUCATION is the best way to prevent accidents.
    My son was at the table with me last weekend cleaning them after a trip to the range. He's 8 and wants to go with me, but here in MA at public ranges the law is 16 w/ adult due to the disaster that happened last year. (I will be looking into joining a private range this year). I will not hide them from him nor fail to provide both he and his sister with the education they need to protect themselves. They are locked in the pistol box in the top of my closet. They don't know the location of the keys and that’s all I hide from them.
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  11. #20
    Thanks for the thought, 6Shooter, but I do now think it was wrong or at the very least very unsafe. This is reflected in my statement that I would now lock up firearms in the event the grandkids were around. It's just too easy for a severe mistake to occur. Of course, like I said, they could pick up the power saw and cut each other up, I suppose.

    The only rationale for our lax treatment of firearms that i could use to justify it was that guns were more "normal" in our society than they are today. Now, from an early age, kids are focused on guns by the media and education establishment and more importantly are indoctrinated with anit-gun messages. This all draws the focus to guns, and in particular, their "evil" nature. Thus, kids are drawn to them, often with mistaken fascination. We just didn't think that much about them.

    I know this is weak, but it's all I got...

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast