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Thread: ID target or Shoot

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
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    South Carolina/Charleston
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    As many of you mentioned, all bets are off if there are other people in the house besides you and your wife and even then it must be understood that roaming around the house in the middle of night can be a dangerous thing. I lock our bedroom door and put a wedge under the door--if my wife or I go out to the kitchen, the door is open, which would indicate that one of us has moved to another area of the house. If you have kids or others in another area of the house it is a much more difficult problem and, obviously, your commitment to go out of your room and ID the noise is a lot more firghtening and dangerous.
    I do not know where y'all live but I am 67 years old and have NEVER been in a position where any sort of weapon was EVER needed inside my home or roaiming around NY, NJ or SC. Maybe it is because I am now old and am a bit more of a "codger" but my current interest in weapons protection and CCW has only recently happened due to my perception that America and the federal government is just not the same as when I grew up and raised a family, and it scares me.

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  3. #42
    Those with preteens or teenagers in the house will understand the need to identify before shooting. While mine haven't done it yet (at least that I know of) the tendency for some to sneak out at night makes it a requirement. Most homes aren't totally without some light and the few seconds it takes to determine if it's a BG in the house is worth the risk, especially if it prevents harming a family member.

  4. #43
    Everybody in my family knows my military history (30 years AD USMC, 6 years RVN) and knows I am armed, at home and at large. They all agree to call before and right after arriving my at my house. I get up, get a cup of coffe and wait for them. My house is pretty well "hardened" and if I don't let you in, it will take a heck of a physical effort by more than one person to get in. I have video cam to cover both doors and I can tell before grabbing gun who is there.

    Even the courts, usually not real friendly to us, recognize that a man's home is his haven. Everybody who has a gun for Home Defense needs to seriously look at their security package( doors, windows, alrms and visual aids) to allow some sort of sane decision making.

    The effect is not only not shooting a loved one but allowing yourself to safely and sanely go into Condition Red before a BG enters the house.

    The gun is only a part of a self defense strategy.

  5. #44
    JJFlash, you are correct, situations like that have happened far too many times! I am not so quick to excuse the father in that instance. I will bet a dollar to a donut that he did not have his finger indexed. We preach this, and preach this constantly. You must have your finger indexed in order to avert the "startle" reflex, and the "sympathetic" reflex.

    The startle reflex is the natural response of the hand to clinch when suddenly startled. This is part of the fight or flight response. The sympathetic response is the natrual reaction of the right hand to want to do what the left hand, and vice versa, is doing. In other words, if you have you finger on the trigger, and reach to grab someone with the other hand. Should the person resist, you could have a sympathetic response, thus pressing the trigger.

    This is why it is so important to build a good firearms foundation, and to seek professional assistance in technique, or training. We owe it to our families, and ourselves. Heck it is the right thing to do if we are responible firearms owners. I am always seeking newer, and better training at every turn. Been to three schools in the last six months, and lining up another in Nov. to take the NRA Basic Instructors School.

    The one thing I have learned is that the more I think I know, the less I have really learned.

    Blkdragon
    Black Dragon Personal Protection/Firearms Training/Unarmed Combat

  6. #45
    I read this thread the other day, and came back to it today because I watched a movie called "Strangers" over the weekend. In that movie, the main character accidentally shoots his friend because he was in the house and the house was being invaded. His friend came to pick him up, and rounded the corner. The guy shot before he ever saw more than a human figure. For me, this one can go either way. Even though it was a movie, I'm sure it has happened before. He didn't identify his target, but he was hiding in a room in his house while it was being intruded upon by people who meant obvious harm to him. I can't find blame for that particular situation.

    My home is fairly secure. My step-daughter is in and out of the house a lot, but she knows to announce when she's coming and going. I keep a light next to my gun, and don't get one without the other. I have three dogs in the house that make it very clear when someone is even near the house. We keep two in the bedroom with us at night, and one in a kennel in the living room. As far as being notified, that's the most effective alarm system I can find. I like to think that if it came down to it, I wouldn't act on anything unless I notified LEO's first. But, if it comes down to the safety of my family, I may not have the luxury of a minute to make a phone call.

  7. #46
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    Jul 2009
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    South Carolina/Charleston
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    It's one thing if it is only you and your wife. Everything in my house, besides my wife is "stuff". "Stuff" is insured and can be replaced. If I leave my locked bedroom looking for the perp, there is a good chance I may get killed---and for what?---insured STUFF--ridiculous. I call the police, wait in my bedroom and if that bedroom door is forced open, then "stuff" is not the issue anymore and the perp will be on the receiving end of very, very different "stuff" that he did not want. If you have children in other parts of the house or their schedule has some 1 or 2 or 3 o'clock entries the situation is totally different and, as many have posted, you and your family had better be well rehearsed and prepared knowing that one mistake is all it takes for a tragedy.

  8. #47
    I totally agree. There are two items in my house that are not living beings that are irreplaceable. Both of them are in the bedroom, which is also the "safe" room. Everything else can stay or go, it's not an issue worth risking my life.

    Some people may think it's excessive, but I have a steel reinforced bedroom door with two deadbolts that can only be operated from the inside. The door jamb has been stregnthened with metal casings for the actual bolts from the locks. To one side of the door is the bathroom with a ceramic tile wall, the other side is my closet. Both of these factors decrease the risk of a BG shooting through the wall, even though it's not impossible. The room is on the second floor, so window entry is a little more difficult. There is an exit strategy, though.

    Our plan is that if something ever happened, we all get to the bedroom if possible and wait it out. If not, I am the only person to act on anything. Identify the threat, then do whatever is in my power to make it stop.

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Indiana
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    It still would be nice if people could be immune from prosecution for using deadly force to protect property, like they are in Texas. Not everyone (myself included), has or can afford insurance for "stuff." My "stuff" is mine and nobody else's; if someone is trying to take it, whether by force or not, I should be able to do whatever I need to do to protect my "stuff." To me, telling people that they can't use deadly force to protect what belongs to them is like saying that criminals are free to help themselves to it as long as they don't jeopardize your life. That is just wrong.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  10. Quote Originally Posted by tattedupboy View Post
    To me, telling people that they can't use deadly force to protect what belongs to them is like saying that criminals are free to help themselves to it as long as they don't jeopardize your life. That is just wrong.
    I'd be willing to bet that the slow decline of the rights of those in England to protect themselves and their property from all the burglars started in the same way by taking away the right to defend your stuff.

  11. #50
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    Jul 2009
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    South Carolina/Charleston
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    Hey tattedupboy and booga: I assume your comments are in reply to my "stuff" posts but I do want you to know that I absolutely agree with you on everything you both said. In my case and some other posters "stuff" can wait until the police come and since my "stuff" is insured, I will not put myself or my wife in harms over some silver, china, crystal or a computer. Everyone has a different situation and different priorities and your comments are loud and clear and understandable and I commend you for your "no **** attitude"-- its just not me. Be very very prepared and be safe god forbid you need to follow up on your priorities.

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