First Aid Kit for the layman - Page 3
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Thread: First Aid Kit for the layman

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Firefighterchen View Post
    If you progress to the point of learning intubation, you will see what they mean by blood oxygen saturation (SpO2).

    The air we breathe is only 21% oxygen. The amount of oxygen we exhale is 14-16%, so we only use 5-7% of the air we breathe. That's why rescue breathing works.

    The more obese and or out of shape someone is will cause available oxygen in the blood to decrease faster. In the OR I was able to see a very fit person last a very long time while intubating, SpO2 didn't drop past 95%. I saw a very obese person drop to 93% in a matter of seconds, that's with preoxygenation too.

    So...compressions are the most important because there is available oxygen in the blood, as well as the pressure in the chest during compressions will exchange some oxygen. Breathing and airway are still very important and should be started immediately when safe to do so (just like you said).

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    Excellent information, chen!
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  3. #22
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    Thanks for the update, guys. I've been out of circulation since my injury, but I heard this was going to happen. I keep CPR masks/gloves on all my keychains, in all our vehicles and in every kit.
    Posterity: you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.--- John Quincy Adams
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  4. #23
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    Oh, and don't forget to ask if an AED's around. They're getting more and more common. I even have one of my own, but since I can't work anymore I can't afford the batteries for it.
    Posterity: you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.--- John Quincy Adams
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  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino View Post
    Oh, and don't forget to ask if an AED's around. They're getting more and more common. I even have one of my own, but since I can't work anymore I can't afford the batteries for it.
    What kind of AED do you have? Want to sell it?
    Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress;
    but I repeat myself.
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  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino View Post
    Oh, and don't forget to ask if an AED's around. They're getting more and more common. I even have one of my own, but since I can't work anymore I can't afford the batteries for it.
    +1000

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  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by BigSlick View Post
    What kind of AED do you have? Want to sell it?
    Philips HeartStart. But I'm gonna hang onto it. Someday Social Security will realize that I really am disabled, and I'll be able to buy stuff again.
    Posterity: you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.--- John Quincy Adams
    Condensed Guide To Ohio Concealed Carry Laws

  8. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by mappow View Post
    Can anyone suggest a kit I can make up for fist aid? I have had some training years ago in the Navy but not as a medic. Something surrounding immediate aid as I'm awaiting EMS to show up on scene.
    Toilet papper and duct tape. If you want to get fancy you can toss in an epipen for alergic reactions. Anything else requires an ER.

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueshell View Post
    Toilet papper and duct tape. If you want to get fancy you can toss in an epipen for alergic reactions. Anything else requires an ER.
    While the ultimate goal is to get someone or yourself to an ER, knowing how to perform emergency first-aid and having the necessary on-hand is a very good idea. I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic or what but, you're advice isn't very good. There can be many situations (especially at the range for example) where knowing bleed-stop, airway, and shock prevention is the only thing that might allow a person to survive long enough for EMS to arrive.

    I don't see any reasonable argument that can be made against getting professional training and obtaining proper equipment to render emergency first-aid, in the off-chance an individual ever needs to. Again, maybe you're being sarcastic... IDK?
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
    [*]Don't be afraid to use sarcasm, mockery and humiliation. They don't respect you. There's no need to pretend you respect them.
    Operation Veterans Relief: http://www.opvr.org/home.html

  10. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by gunnerbob View Post
    While the ultimate goal is to get someone or yourself to an ER, knowing how to perform emergency first-aid and having the necessary on-hand is a very good idea. I'm not sure if you're being sarcastic or what but, you're advice isn't very good. There can be many situations (especially at the range for example) where knowing bleed-stop, airway, and shock prevention is the only thing that might allow a person to survive long enough for EMS to arrive.

    I don't see any reasonable argument that can be made against getting professional training and obtaining proper equipment to render emergency first-aid, in the off-chance an individual ever needs to. Again, maybe you're being sarcastic... IDK?
    Yeah I'm being a touch sarcastic, to emphasize the basic first aid need and cut through any false sense of security buying a fancy kit may give.

    I'm an Army combat veteran, and 90% of combat medicin is stopping the bleeding.

    I can't inject comprehensive knowledge into a post. That's what actual classes are for. What I can do is cut right to the core of combat medicin, and that core is to stop bleeding and evacuate the casualty asap.

    And no, toilet paper and duct tape is a great thing to use compared to some of the improvised dressings I've personaly seen used.

    Don't get wrapped around the axle over how many of each size gaus pad and bandaid you have. A beginner needs to focus on the basics and expand from there, and 'the basics' is stop the bleeding & evacuate the casualty.

  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blueshell View Post
    Yeah I'm being a touch sarcastic, to emphasize the basic first aid need and cut through any false sense of security buying a fancy kit may give.

    I'm an Army combat veteran, and 90% of combat medicin is stopping the bleeding.

    I can't inject comprehensive knowledge into a post. That's what actual classes are for. What I can do is cut right to the core of combat medicin, and that core is to stop bleeding and evacuate the casualty asap.

    And no, toilet paper and duct tape is a great thing to use compared to some of the improvised dressings I've personaly seen used.

    Don't get wrapped around the axle over how many of each size gaus pad and bandaid you have. A beginner needs to focus on the basics and expand from there, and 'the basics' is stop the bleeding & evacuate the casualty.
    Thank you for your points, as they're very valid. As you say, however much information those of us posting can give it doesn't replace getting professional instruction. The primary posters in this sub-forum are current or former EMTs and Paramedics, their information is valid and based from experience. I myself am a veteran with the associated SABC training, I was on one combat deployment and didn't render in any treatment in the field. The most extensive combat-related care I provided was while volunteering at the Bagram Hospital. Needless to say, I'm an amateur when it comes to this stuff but I'm still willing to offer up what I do know. Mostly, I'm here to learn from others such as yourself.

    Thank you for your service, Blueshell.

    P.S. In the context of poor choices of improvised bandages, I'll cede that toilet paper and duct tape are good options. The worst I've seen used as a bandage was a dirty sock... it did the trick though. Thank goodness for professional care thereafter, otherwise I'm sure infection would have been a major issue.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
    [*]Don't be afraid to use sarcasm, mockery and humiliation. They don't respect you. There's no need to pretend you respect them.
    Operation Veterans Relief: http://www.opvr.org/home.html

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