First Aid Kit for the layman
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Thread: First Aid Kit for the layman

  1. #1
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    First Aid Kit for the layman

    Can anyone suggest a kit I can make up for fist aid? I have had some training years ago in the Navy but not as a medic. Something surrounding immediate aid as I'm awaiting EMS to show up on scene.
    "The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities." --author and philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982)

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  3. #2
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    Ask yourself what types of injuries do you wish to take care of with your kit.

    When you answer that question then your original question becomes more easily answered.

    One thing I do know is the bundled first aid kits you can buy never seem to have all the medical supplies that I wish to have in my kit. I bought a fishing tackle box (medium to small size) to serve as my medical kit. This is what I have: Gander Mountain Soft-Sided Tackle Bag Large Blue-445089 - Gander Mountain
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  4. #3
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    REI sells a couple of different aid bags that would do very well for a start. Perhaps get a load out list for a combat lifesaver (do they still have those?) bag.
    In an emergency individuals do not rise to the occasion, they fall to the level of their MASTERED training
    Barrett Tillman

  5. #4
    I'm a former US Army Medic, married to a Nurse Practitioner. wolf_fire is absolutely correct-what is your situation? When the wife and I were cruising sailors she designed the aid kit, stored in an orange plastic "ammo" box with a gasket, to address emergencies at sea up to a week from landfall. As a former medic and rescue squad man I was capable with most, but not all of her equipment. She, of course, was. We addressed bleeding, breathing and not so much poisoning (the old BBP routine). I had taught first aid for the Red Cross and PADI dive certification. We had the usual 2 X 2's 4 X 4's roll gauze, ACE bandages plus a suture kit, normal saline and a Foley catheter. Her comment was "If you're going to put fluids in, you have to be able to get fluids out". Mine was, "You'll have to cut my belly open before you stick that thing up me." Again, the parameters here were being far from land.

    At the range, my small aid kit contains the square gauze mentioned above, the roll gauze, tampons in case I decide to plug a gunshot wound with one and yes, I know that's controversial but most of my LEO friends carry them for that reason, and band-aids for when I run a staple through my finger (I'm on blood "thinners" following a heart attack). I do NOT carry "quick-Clot" bandages since an ER is no more than 20 minutes away. My EMT/ER friends say they can cause more trouble than help. If we'd known about them, we might have had a few on the sailboat, but didn't. It's probably a good idea to address the possibility of a sucking chest wound, as well. Add a disposable poncho.

    Here's another point to consider. If you need emergency help do you have phone service? A public range near New Castle, VA has no cell service for any carrier. Get injured and your best bet is to have someone toss you in a car and drive seven miles to New Castle where you pick up a signal. My range, near Boones Mill, VA, has full cell service and the Boone's Mill Fire & Rescue have an electronic key to our gate. There are ER's in Rocky Mount, VA and Roanoke, VA, both about a fifteen minute drive.

  6. #5
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    LOL Chris, I'm cringing at the Foley catheter comment. As a former EMT and having worked on Ambulances and ER's I have seen them being inserted. That visual experience left me weak in the knees. At the time I was dating a nursing student and she was almost through her RN degree and asked if she could practice with a catheter on me. At first I thought she was joking.... but she wasn't. I never saw her again. To this day I still think she doesn't know why.
    Suppose you were an idiot, and suppose you were a member of Congress;
    but I repeat myself.
    Mark Twain

  7. #6
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    OK, so being that this is a carry web site, my first priority would be if shot by a BG. Gauze, direct pressure, possibly a tourniquet. Am I missing something? Again, this would be a kit to cover the 7-15 minutes waiting on EMS. If shot and survived the initial interaction. I would sooner not bleed out waiting on LEO/EMS response.
    "The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities." --author and philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982)

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by mappow View Post
    OK, so being that this is a carry web site, my first priority would be if shot by a BG. Gauze, direct pressure, possibly a tourniquet. Am I missing something? Again, this would be a kit to cover the 7-15 minutes waiting on EMS. If shot and survived the initial interaction. I would sooner not bleed out waiting on LEO/EMS response.
    Gunshot First Aid Kits - USA Carry

    usa carry wrote this article. It's fairly decent and tells you what products to get for specifically GSWs.

    To echo what the article says at the end, if you do not now how to use some of this equipment, get trained.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  9. #8
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    Thanks for the info, great article. Gives me a good place to start for shopping and additional info.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mappow View Post
    OK, so being that this is a carry web site, my first priority would be if shot by a BG. Gauze, direct pressure, possibly a tourniquet. Am I missing something? Again, this would be a kit to cover the 7-15 minutes waiting on EMS. If shot and survived the initial interaction. I would sooner not bleed out waiting on LEO/EMS response.
    Just a heads up, before EMS arrives (specially for a gun shot wound call) police will secure the scene first. You are looking at the average time being more like a minimum of 30 minutes.

    For what it's worth, leading causes of death in relation to gsw: hemorrhage (60%), tension pneumo, obstructed airway.

    You are exactly right about bleeding control. Gauze and direct pressure, followed by a tourniquet. If you have gauze or granules with a clotting factor, you would pack the wound or pour the granules in before pressure.

    Sent from my HTCONE using USA Carry mobile app
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by mappow View Post
    OK, so being that this is a carry web site, my first priority would be if shot by a BG. Gauze, direct pressure, possibly a tourniquet. Am I missing something? Again, this would be a kit to cover the 7-15 minutes waiting on EMS. If shot and survived the initial interaction. I would sooner not bleed out waiting on LEO/EMS response.
    To piggy back off of Chen, as far as the tourniquet goes... we have always been taught that this is the last measure used to stop bleeding. As you know, use direct pressure on the wound, if it's an extremity raise it above the heart and if this doesn't slow the bleeding you would then move to place pressure on the pressure points (Google where they're located). We are taught to think that if we apply our own or have a tourniquet applied to us, that because of the time required to be taken to a hospital, this would likely mean losing the limb. This, however, is combat trauma treatment and hospitals are usually much further away but, I believe the line of thinking to remain true... a tourniquet is the last option. If you're conscious, and there are bystanders, you can direct them to apply the pressure for you being as that you may very well go into shock soon and may lose the ability to self-treat. Do your best to explain what needs to be done to them and if you can... tell them how to treat for shock as quickly as you can... because you are about to be in it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
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