Caution when using the talon range in tallahassee, florida:
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Thread: Caution when using the talon range in tallahassee, florida:

  1. Caution when using the talon range in tallahassee, florida:

    For those of you using the Talon Range in Tallahassee, Florida; I feel like you need to read this account of my experience at that facility. My son told me that he would be competing in a pistol competition at Talon Range in Tallahassee on Saturday January 3, 2015. He asked if I would like to come and observe and I agreed. I had never been to this range before today and normally use the Tallahassee Rifle & Pistol Club Range. I am certified as both an instructor and range safety officer through the NRA.

    It was raining the morning I left for the range but it had slowed to a drizzle by the time I got to the competition sight. I took a brief period of time to drive around to look at the configuration of the various shooting stations and also to find the competition site. My first impression was that the range was not laid-out in a straight-line configuration. The shooting stations were laid out at various twists and turns off the access roads.

    I put on eye and ear protection and began watching the shooters compete. I stood approximately 12 to 15 feet behind the competitors as they fired at the various stations. I was standing behind a large earthen berm, observing the second shooter at the last firing position, when I felt this significant jolt which knocked my hearing protectors from my head and flung them out to my front. My left ear was ringing and I had a minor grazed cut on my left temple. A bullet had apparently ricocheted from an another shooting station. The bullet entered the bottom of my left ear protector and then exited through the top creating about a 1 and ˝ inch gash through the plastic. If the bullet had been just a short space to the right I could have been killed or seriously injured. There was no protocol for stopping the competition to determine if there was an undiscovered hazard or construction flaw. One of the owners of the range was actually competing and he handed me his ear protectors to replace the ones that got shot off my head. The competition then continued as if there had been no critical incident.

    I never got to see my son shoot. I felt it was best to leave the shooting range immediately because I did not know if it was just a freak accident or if there was some type of undiscovered hazard that could cause another injury. I have had some close calls in my life but that was certainly the worse.

    Can a range be too large for safety, especially if a straight-line configuration of shooting station is not utilized? I think so especially during high usage like competition events. I know that I never plan to use this range again after my experience and encourage anyone who does to be on high alert for personal safety.da
    Last edited by MONTANA; 01-17-2015 at 04:47 PM. Reason: date correction in text

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  3. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by MONTANA View Post
    For those of you using the Talon Range in Tallahassee, Florida; I feel like you need to read this account of my experience at that facility. My son told me that he would be competing in a pistol competition at Talon Range in Tallahassee on Saturday January 3, 2014. He asked if I would like to come and observe and I agreed. I had never been to this range before today and normally use the Tallahassee Rifle & Pistol Club Range. I am certified as both an instructor and range safety officer through the NRA.

    It was raining the morning I left for the range but it had slowed to a drizzle by the time I got to the competition sight. I took a brief period of time to drive around to look at the configuration of the various shooting stations and also to find the competition site. My first impression was that the range was not laid-out in a straight-line configuration. The shooting stations were laid out at various twists and turns off the access roads.

    I put on eye and ear protection and began watching the shooters compete. I stood approximately 12 to 15 feet behind the competitors as they fired at the various stations. I was standing behind a large earthen berm, observing the second shooter at the last firing position, when I felt this significant jolt which knocked my hearing protectors from my head and flung them out to my front. My left ear was ringing and I had a minor grazed cut on my left temple. A bullet had apparently ricocheted from an another shooting station. The bullet entered the bottom of my left ear protector and then exited through the top creating about a 1 and ˝ inch gash through the plastic. If the bullet had been just a short space to the right I could have been killed or seriously injured. There was no protocol for stopping the competition to determine if there was an undiscovered hazard or construction flaw. One of the owners of the range was actually competing and he handed me his ear protectors to replace the ones that got shot off my head. The competition then continued as if there had been no critical incident.

    I never got to see my son shoot. I felt it was best to leave the shooting range immediately because I did not know if it was just a freak accident or if there was some type of undiscovered hazard that could cause another injury. I have had some close calls in my life but that was certainly the worse.

    Can a range be too large for safety, especially if a straight-line configuration of shooting station is not utilized? I think so especially during high usage like competition events. I know that I never plan to use this range again after my experience and encourage anyone who does to be on high alert for personal safety.
    I think you should be telling this to the police more than to usacarry. If they are so unconcerned about ricochets like that, it's only a matter of time before someone actually does get hurt or killed.
    ~~~ Theodore Roosevelt
    * To educate a man in mind, and not in morals, is to educate a menace to society.

  4. You are probably right. However, I'm not sure my state of mind and common sense were fully functional immediately after the event. But would the police really pursue a charge of reckless endangerment when there was no intent, no serious injury, and safety berms being in place? I'm just not sure how much even well-informed people are about a bullet's capacity to tumble and skip. Thus the configuration of berms and shooting stations are really important.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MONTANA View Post
    You are probably right. However, I'm not sure my state of mind and common sense were fully functional immediately after the event. But would the police really pursue a charge of reckless endangerment when there was no intent, no serious injury, and safety berms being in place? I'm just not sure how much even well-informed people are about a bullet's capacity to tumble and skip. Thus the configuration of berms and shooting stations are really important.
    Honestly I am not sure ... Maybe its more of an ATF or OSHA thing?
    ~~~ Theodore Roosevelt
    * To educate a man in mind, and not in morals, is to educate a menace to society.

  6. #5
    "Maybe its more of an ATF or OSHA thing?"
    Those would be about the last 2 choices I would have.
    [

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by R&M View Post
    "Maybe its more of an ATF or OSHA thing?"
    Those would be about the last 2 choices I would have.
    Well, I dunno what the right choice is, but if it were me that just about got my head blown off, I'd take some sort of action further than chatting about it on a forum.
    ~~~ Theodore Roosevelt
    * To educate a man in mind, and not in morals, is to educate a menace to society.

  8. #7
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    Unfortunately, the incident happened over a year ago (Jan 3, 2014). Your time window for getting any action out of anyone is probably closed. You should have at least reported it to the county sheriff's office and filed a report. The range where it happened should have also paid for your medical bills. Right now, the only thing you may be able to do is consult a lawyer to see if there is any civil action you could take.


    -
    “Only a rookie who knows nothing about science would say science takes away from faith. If you really study science, it will bring you closer to God.” —JAMES TOUR, NANOSCIENTIST

  9. Montana,

    If you believe an unsafe condition exists, you should report it. Write a letter to the club explaining the occurrence. Send copies to the local governmental bodies that licensed or approved the business, as well as any organizations that authorized or approved the matches. The layout should have been inspected by at least one of them before the club was allowed to open to the public. Sometimes things are missed or changes are made after approval. All shooting organizations emphasize safety. There could have been an accidental discharge on the firing line or at some other location.

    I assume you mean Jan 3, 2015 since you say it was Saturday.

  10. I apologize to readers. It did not happen over a year ago. I made a typo. It was in January, 2015 and I have corrected the mistake. I really gave this whole incident serious thought after I left the range. I'm not an attorney, but I just didn't see any legal action I could take. There were safety berms in place. There was no intent. I chose to discuss it here just to give a heads-up to readers that this happened. Is it a design flaw in range construction? Is the range trying to conduct too many competition events simultaneously? Or was it just a freak accident? Anyway, I went away with an attitude of thankfulness and that's where I am at this moment. I would be interested in knowing if there have been other dangerous incidents from folks using the range.

  11. #10
    I don`t shoot at a range, but if I did safety would be my main concern. YOU were almost killed, or at the very least seriously injured (you have your damaged hearing protection to prove this), this serious safety issue needs to be brought to someone`s attention. Either the police, ATF, or OSHA, or all three, and corrections made to fix the safety issues at this range. Or the range needs to be shut down until they are. As we all know, shooting is a fun sport, but not at the cost of ones safety or life.

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