Reloads
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Thread: Reloads

  1. #1

    Reloads

    Who here reloads? I've been thinking about getting into it. I have enough land around my house that allowed me to set up my own range. I'm shooting at least once a week, average 150 rounds. From an accessibility standpoint, it makes sense to reload. Ammo is still hard to find in my area. Am I going to be saving that much money, after the initial investment? Also, what kind of time commitment is it. And my most important question, how much of a margin for error is there? Not having any experience in this, I am a little hesitant at even the thought. Any suggestions?

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  3. #2
    Get a good book and study up.. If you have been saving your brass, then it will certainly cut your cost, IF you have the time to dedicate to it..
    Bullet heads and powder and primers are pretty much available, it's the brass that's been hard to get..

    There are two basic types of presses - one at a time press and progressive presses..

    With one at a time type, basically you would get your brass together and cleaned
    de-prime one at a time until all the brass is done, then prime one at a time until done, etc...

    With a progressive there are 4 stations, so you put in the 1st shell and the 1st step is done, then you add another shell (the 1st shell rotates to the next position) now shell you just added does the 1st step, and the shell you did 1st does the 2nd step ,then the next time 3rd step, 2nd step, and 1st step,
    Next one 4th (completed bullet) 3rd, 2nd, 1st - from this point forward you get a one completed bullet with each lever pull..
    The progressives are more expensive, but speeds up and simplifies the process..

    That's all I know, like I said, get a good book and it will tell you about all the different powders and measures for each caliber bullet..

    Well within most peoples ability to do, but you need to pay attention to what you are doing so you don't get a shell with too much powder (Big Bang, and may damage the gun) or little to no powder which can cause a squib load (bullet gets stuck in the barrel, and the next bullet makes the gun blow up)..

    If you are NOT too ADHD - and can pay attention to details for long periods of time, and you are the kind of person that doesn't mind doing repetitive tasks, then go for it..

    Gulf Coast, Floriduh
    Sccy is the limit

  4. Let me just add another type of press, a turret press. It is combination of both single stage and progressive. The time commitment is up to you but it takes me about 15 to 20 minutes or so to load a box of 50.

    Finding primers can be hit or miss.

    You can save money but probably wont. I bet you end up shooting twice as many rounds as normal but that's part of the fun.

    Take your time, move slowly and learn all you can.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Tampa Bay Area
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ga9mm View Post
    Who here reloads? I've been thinking about getting into it. I have enough land around my house that allowed me to set up my own range. I'm shooting at least once a week, average 150 rounds. From an accessibility standpoint, it makes sense to reload. Ammo is still hard to find in my area. Am I going to be saving that much money, after the initial investment? Also, what kind of time commitment is it. And my most important question, how much of a margin for error is there? Not having any experience in this, I am a little hesitant at even the thought. Any suggestions?
    I've been reloading for years now and love it as a hobby and as a way to keep myself in ammo.

    "Am I going to be saving that much money, after the initial investment?"
    It is cheaper to reload ammo and normally, as long as your not having to buy brass, you are looking at about 50% less then factory. I been casting my own .45 acp range bullets now and can load a box of 50 for about $3.00. Will you save money? Probably not becuase you will just end up shooting a lot more.

    "Also, what kind of time commitment is it"
    Money wise, I spent about $250 total for my turret press setup and I can normally load about 100-150 pistol rounds an hour.

    " how much of a margin for error is there? Not having any experience in this, I am a little hesitant at even the thought."
    My first suggestion is to buy a good reloading book. It'll explain the entire process. In short you'll have a expectable powder range for a specific caliber with a minimal overall cartridge length. At first I started loading at the low end of the powder range and seated the bullets a few thousandths longer then the min. After you get more comfortable you can start adjusting the charge, primer brands, ect to find the best loads for the gun. Two things I do while reloading is visual check the case after every powder charge and every 5 to 10 rounds I reweigh the powder charges. This will help eliminate double charged cases or no powder.

    Hope this helps and feel free to PM me with any other questions. I'll try and help out.
    "When Government fears the people, it's liberty. When people fear the Government, it's tyranny."
    - Benjamin Franklin

  6. #5
    Very cool. Thanks to all of you!!

  7. #6
    There are lots of videos on reloading.. If you are still trying to decide, it may be work a little time to view some..

    Remember this does NOT replace a good book!!!

    I don't know anything about the people that produced these videos, but here are a few examples..

    Some Basics can be seen here

    Cost and Benefits to Reloading Your Own Ammo

    Reloading ammunition tools and equipment

    Gulf Coast, Floriduh
    Sccy is the limit

  8. #7
    I've been reloading since I was about 14 or so. I'm 45. Can you save money? Yes. Will you shoot more? Yes. I haven't been doing my part to support the ammo companies for years. Unless it was in components. Read,learn,ask questions. You will enjoy it. And most reloaders will gladly share their experience and knowledge. Good luck! Oh yeah,for rifle bullets,buy Sierra. LOL
    Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what's for dinner. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote." - Benjamin Franklin

  9. #8
    Part of my reasoning for wanting to reload is because I do shoot a lot. It's getting harder and harder to find target rounds, and the price has increased when I can find them. Thanks for all the input. I asked my wife for a press for Christmas. Now I'm just crossing my fingers, taking out the trash, sweeping the floor, etc...

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    South Carolina, Myrtle Beach
    Posts
    156
    I have been reloading for a few years with a Dillon 550 progressive press. If I can do it anyone can. As of late primers have been tough to find but if you allocate money to components and purchase on a regular basis you will be fine. If i did not load .45ACP with the availability of practice ammo my 1911s would be pretty paperweights.

    If you save brass you should be able to reload for $7-$8 a box of 50. So after reloading only 32-35 boxes you have made back the cost of equipment:
    Dillon Press $400 comes with 1 dye set up
    Digital scale $35
    Digital Caliper $35
    Tumbler $60
    Dillon has the best customer service in the industry. Great "walk you through" for problems. Any damaged part replaced free of charge.

    1000rds .45ACP
    Ranier 200/230gr bullets $120 (can be less)
    Federal primers $35
    Powder, less than a pound $10
    Cost per 1000: $165 or$8.25 a box

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