Cleaning a Handgun? - Page 2
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Thread: Cleaning a Handgun?

  1. #11
    GET SOME TRAINING!

    And, as has been stated, "less" is better as regards solvent and oil when cleaning your gun. I use old toothbrushes and Q-tips when cleaning my weaponry and use "just enough" solvent (and even less oil) to get the job done.

    Welcome to the site!

  2.   
  3. Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    I watched this video of a guy cleaning a SW40VE like the one i want to get, and i want to make sure i purchase the correct items to clean it with.

    YouTube- cleaning my SW40VE

    I know i will need a cleaning kit but what about solvents and oils?

    This guy is using a proper solvent but he is also using WD-40 instead of proper oils. I read a few places that WD40 will gum up and have brown buildup.

    Anyone know what the best value cleaning kits , solvents and oils are?

    Is a synthetic product like Birchwoods a good solvent?

    Amazon.com: Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber Solvent/Degreaser 13oz Synthetic Safe Md: 33344: Sports & Outdoors

    Also what is a good oil, i have heard many things. I was looking at this same branded synthetic oil.

    Amazon.com: Gun Scrubber® Synthetic Gun Oil with PTFE Lubricant: Sports & Outdoors


    Any input on cleaning kits, solvent, oils would be much appreciated to me and i am sure the OP would like some input on some of this too.
    No way! IMO WD40 is not good for the gun, man. Use proper Gun cleaning stuffs.
    NRA Life Member

  4. Less is MORE

    if you sweat on your gun a lot, you may actually want to occasionally spray the trigger group and mainspring with WD 40. I personally do not. but i know people who do.

    The oozing and seeping is a definite sign of too much goop. When running brushes or patches, spray them, not the barrel. Exception: a very dirty barrel might need direct spray, but rarely. Shotguns and BP rifles, can be a different story.

    go lightly. oil attracts dust and lint. after cleaning, as i reassemble i spray a patch, and use that to lightly oil the rails and friction points. then i run that oiled patch thru the bore once, reassemble, and done.

    Once in a while i dissamble the magazines, to clean and lube, again lightly. i'd suggest you never actually spray the gun with solvent or oil. use a patch, and wipe it down. Unless you dunk your gun in a toilet (actually did that once, to my everlasting embarrassment) or a swimming pool or the like, and then after you clean and dry it, go ahead and spray the hell out of it with rem oil and hang it up to drip dry!

    Othe than that, less is more.
    "Laws that forbid the carrying of arms ... make things worse for the assaulted and better for the assailants ... for an unarmed man may be attacked with greater confidence than an armed man." - Thomas Jefferson

  5. #14
    Of course, there is this video: YouTube - STOP! OR MY MOM WILL SHOOT - Part 2/9

    Look at the 7:40 mark.

  6. #15
    Thats old school epic fail on the cleaning of a gun. Haven't seen that movie since i was too young to understand everything in it.


    Anyone have any recommendations on cleaning kits, solvents and oils?

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    Thats old school epic fail on the cleaning of a gun. Haven't seen that movie since i was too young to understand everything in it.


    Anyone have any recommendations on cleaning kits, solvents and oils?
    Keep the WD-40 away from your firearms. It has many good uses around the house, cleaning and maintenance of firearms isn't one of them.

    Before you start cleaning your firearm, make absolutely sure that it's unloaded and that you have secured (as in locked up or put away in another room whenever possible) all live ammo.

    Suggestions for cleaning solvents:

    Mil-tec
    Break Free
    Hoppes products
    Birchwood Casey products

    I find that "Gun Scrubber" (Birchwood Casey product) is very effective. Once I'm done initially blasting the heavy dirt and debris, then I break out the brushes and cleaning rods to finish up the cleaning. I use Mil-tec for my cleaning and lubrication needs.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  8. #17
    Thanks for the recommendations gf, i will be looking into the M-Pro 7 products for cleaning and lube, but what about a bore brush or cleaning kit, what is something inexpensive that works well? Do you have to spend a lot of money to get a quality kit? I don't have to have a large kit i just need it for a handgun, not a full kit.

  9. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    Thanks for the recommendations gf, i will be looking into the M-Pro 7 products for cleaning and lube, but what about a bore brush or cleaning kit, what is something inexpensive that works well? Do you have to spend a lot of money to get a quality kit? I don't have to have a large kit i just need it for a handgun, not a full kit.
    A universal handgun cleaning kit shouldn't run more than $20 - $25. I've seen them at Wal-mart, The Sports Authority, Big 5, etc. Best price was at Wal-mart. If you rather put together your own, you could do that as well. I've got several that I've assembled. I picked up a handgun rod, brushes for the various calibers, patch loops for the .22 caliber and one for all other calibers, a firm bristle tooth brush, a few cloth diapers, some cotton patches, a steel wire brush, a few dental picks and scrapers, and a nice Plano case to house it all. Total cost came out to just under $20. I have a couple of universal cleaning kits, and a few that I've assembled on my own. I keep one kit in my range bag, one in the vehicle, and one I use when I teach classes so students know what they would need to clean their firearms. Many of the items can be found around their homes. It's just something basic to get them started. As they get more into shooting and the finer points of cleaning their firearms, they will discover other tools that work well. I personally like the wooden applicators (looks like a q-tip, but on a long wooden stick). The cotton tip can be used to clean, and the wooden stick can be cracked at an angle and used as a scraper in the "hard to reach" places.


    Cleaning a firearm is a very personal thing. There are many ways to do it, and all kinds of equipment that does the job. As long as the end result is accomplished, then you've done good.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. #19
    Walmart has a universal handgun cleaning kit by Remington for like 8 bucks, its just a few brushes and rods and also a few mop brushes. It didn't say only on the kit but it stated 9 mm, 357 sig and a couple others on the brushes included but nothing about .40 caliber on it.

    Is this too cheap of a kit to combine with some good M-Pro 7 cleaner and oil? Will i have to get a kit that specifies a .40 caliber brush or one too big might not clean well?

    Or maybe i should spend a little more on the Reminton Fieldmaster kit that has cleaning patches and more items? Its like $18 at my walmart.

  11. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    Walmart has a universal handgun cleaning kit by Remington for like 8 bucks, its just a few brushes and rods and also a few mop brushes. It didn't say only on the kit but it stated 9 mm, 357 sig and a couple others on the brushes included but nothing about .40 caliber on it.

    Is this too cheap of a kit to combine with some good M-Pro 7 cleaner and oil? Will i have to get a kit that specifies a .40 caliber brush or one too big might not clean well?

    Or maybe i should spend a little more on the Reminton Fieldmaster kit that has cleaning patches and more items? Its like $18 at my walmart.
    The $8 kit should work for you. You might want to pick up a .40 cal brush and any other calibers that you might need, but aren't included (like a .45 cal if you have the pistol or plan on picking one up in the near future). Stuff can always be added to the kit. I would recommend picking up a couple of microfiber cleaning cloths and cotton diapers from the automotive section. As for cleaning patches, you can use an old t-shirt and cut it up into the correct size for the calibers you'll be cleaning, or you can pick up a bag of patches from Wal-mart. If you use a t-shirt, be sure it's 100% cotton. Cotton blend fabrics don't clean as well. Be sure the patches match the calibers you're cleaning, or if you want to pick up commercial patches and save some money, you can pick up 12 gauge patches and cut them into 1/4s'. A sharp pair of scissors should do the trick.

    Thing to keep in mind is that you want a brush that is bigger than the barrel, but not too big (like you wouldn't want to clean a .357 mag using a .45 cal brush). A Bore Snake would be a good thing to have as well. Only problem with the Bore Snake is that you have to get one in each caliber. They usually run between $15 - $20 each.

    The Fieldmaster is a good cleaning kit, but has a bunch of stuff you might never use. You'll probably spend the same amount of money picking up the less expensive kit and adding to it. Even if you spend a little more, you'll end up having a bunch of stuff that you'll actually have use for, and the patches will be a lot better than the synthetic fabric patches that come with most commercial universal cleaning kits. I have friends who have picked up a small tackle box that they use to store their gun cleaning supplies. Being that you have a preference in cleaning oil and solvents, all of the stuff probably won't fit into the box that the economy kit comes in. Another thing you might want to think about picking up would be "Flitz" metal polish in the gray tube. It works great to remove minor surface rust that may pop up on your firearm.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

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