Cleaning a Handgun? - Page 3
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Thread: Cleaning a Handgun?

  1. #21
    At what stage would you use a boresnake in the cleaning process? Does it bypass any of the other steps? I have plenty of 100% cotton t-shirts that need to be thrown out full of holes, so i think that will work for awhile. Also what is the microfiber cloth used for in the cleaning process. Is it the same as the t-shirts or patches? I guess you would use them to wipe the gun down after using solvent and oils to get excess off?

    As to the Solvents, and Oils, i don't really have a preference i just don't know whats best and the M-Pro 7 seemed top of the line. If you have suggestions on other cleaners and oils not mentioned i am all ears i haven't purchased a single thing yet.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    At what stage would you use a boresnake in the cleaning process? Does it bypass any of the other steps? I have plenty of 100% cotton t-shirts that need to be thrown out full of holes, so i think that will work for awhile. Also what is the microfiber cloth used for in the cleaning process. Is it the same as the t-shirts or patches? I guess you would use them to wipe the gun down after using solvent and oils to get excess off?

    As to the Solvents, and Oils, i don't really have a preference i just don't know whats best and the M-Pro 7 seemed top of the line. If you have suggestions on other cleaners and oils not mentioned i am all ears i haven't purchased a single thing yet.
    The Bore Snake is good to use on the range while the gun is still warm after you're done shooting. Many ranges won't allow you to break down your firearm and clean it on the firing line. The bore snake gets a lot of the residue and other debris out of the barrel and chamber area making it easier to clean when you get to an appropriate place.

    I use the microfiber cloth or cotton diaper to wipe up excess fluids and keep finger prints off of the finish of the gun when I'm done cleaning it. The microfiber cloth isn't as absorbant as the cloth diaper, so I use it when I simply want to wipe down the exterior of the gun. This minimizes the possibility of removing the light coat of oil that's good to have on the exterior metal surfaces of the firearm. A cotton cloth will work, but may be a little too absorbant and you will notice little patches of lubricant missing where your fingers held the barrel.

    I personally use a combination of the Birchwood Casey Gun Scrubber and Mil-tec. I'm not sure what the "top of the line" cleaning/lubricating brands are. All I know is that the products I listed in a previous post work well and aren't too expensive. Mil-tec works best in moderation, so a little will go a long way.

    You could probably find all of the cleaning supplies at your local Wal-mart, provided they have a decent firearms section. The ones here in PRHI are pretty sad. While traveling through "gun friendly" states, I've found many Wal-mart stores with an excellent selection of supplies I normally use. I requested that the local Wal-mart stores here in PRHI bring in some of the cleaning stuff I like, but haven't seen anything change yet. I'm not holding my breath.




    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  4. #23
    Nah, you did OK. Break free is designed to do that so it gets the dirt & debris outta the nooks and crannies of a military weapon. I just lay it aside and wipe it down with a small towel the next day and it'll be gone.
    In the beginning, the patriot is a scarce man -- brave, hated, and scorned. But when his cause succeeds, the timid join him. For then, it costs nothing to be a patriot. -- Mark Twain

  5. #24
    The following was posted on another thread sometime back about a test a guy did to see what was the best rust preventive. The top two according to the article was Break Free CLP which I am familiar with and Eezox which I am not.

    http://www.thegunzone.com/rust.html
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  6. #25
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    Exclamation Boresnake is bad JUJU

    Do not use a boresnake if you value accuracy.
    Nylon is abrasive to steel, actually it is the dirt and crap in nylon, but if you do not believe me look at a pulley used for nylon rope.

    When you pull through a bore snake it does not come perfectly squarely out of the crown. over time you will wear a groove only a few thousandths of an inch but none the less it will destroy accuracy. It happens a lot in rifles and it is almost always fixable by cutting a new crown.

    I cannot recommend boresnake
    FESTUS
    IN OMNIA PARATUS

  7. #26
    If thats even possible with a boresnake i will skip it and just use the more traditional cleaning methods. I don't think i could fire enough rounds through a gun to have to break it down on the spot to clean it at the range.

  8. #27
    I have been using the new M-Pro series of surfactants.

    Not totally sure what my verdict will be yet.

    I am not quite sure if the stuff works better than Sweet's.

    -Doc

  9. #28
    I remember reading an article in either Guns and Ammo or American Rifleman where the author contended that most of us over-clean our firearms. I have to agree. If you're shooting modern propellants and non-corrosive primers very little cleaning is required and all that disassembly/reassembly only loosens pins, strips screws, etc. A little solvent thru the barrel on a brush and a few clean patches followed by an oiled patch would suffice in most cases.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by festus View Post
    Do not use a boresnake if you value accuracy.
    Nylon is abrasive to steel, actually it is the dirt and crap in nylon, but if you do not believe me look at a pulley used for nylon rope.

    When you pull through a bore snake it does not come perfectly squarely out of the crown. over time you will wear a groove only a few thousandths of an inch but none the less it will destroy accuracy. It happens a lot in rifles and it is almost always fixable by cutting a new crown.

    I cannot recommend boresnake
    Never heard that about the Bore Snake. I've got a couple and used it a few times. Works great on my shotgun, and my hunting rifles in the field. I've never heard of any problems, but it does make sense and is something I'll be looking into.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  11. #30
    Quote Originally Posted by AvidshooterTX View Post
    I remember reading an article in either Guns and Ammo or American Rifleman where the author contended that most of us over-clean our firearms. I have to agree. If you're shooting modern propellants and non-corrosive primers very little cleaning is required and all that disassembly/reassembly only loosens pins, strips screws, etc. A little solvent thru the barrel on a brush and a few clean patches followed by an oiled patch would suffice in most cases.
    Pretty much what i gathered from some research; basically don't over clean your guns. I was planning on cleaning my gun new and then i read a lot about not over cleaning or over oiling anything. I hear the biggest issue with guns sent back to the factory is over oiling, with the 2nd biggest problem being under oiling, so take what you will from that, i guess it just takes experience to oil your gun properly.

    I also saw a good video on cleaning your magazines, which from what i understand, should not be neglected. I hear just wiping out the inside of the magazine, blowing it out with air and wiping the spring off go a long way. I hear you can even "very lightly" oil the spring with a cloth that already has a little oil on it, but that use caution because of contaminating your ammo.

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