Using FMJ for breaking in new handgun? - Page 3
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Thread: Using FMJ for breaking in new handgun?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    In some cases yes, to an extent. It's a lot safer to use the proper cleaning solvent to properly remove the lead residue.



    gf
    Thanks GF, I should have given a bit more info. Let's say I go to the range and shoot 50 or so RNL from my Glock 30. Before I go home I shoot, say 10 factory ball ammo rounds it. Will this clean some of the lead out? I know there is no replacement of the good old bore brush and solvent scrubbing. Thanks again.

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  3. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Unless you're hunting predatory mammals, I'd say that there's a big difference between hunting ammo and SD ammo. I would not want to put my personal safety in jeopardy because I had a magazine of faulty ammunition. If I miss a shot at a trophy animal because of ammo, it's likely I may get another chance in the future. There are no "re-takes" when it comes to a "life of death" situation

    gf
    . I fired off an e-mail to the nice folks at the federal ammo factory. Lets see what they say.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    So the story goes..... A guy at a gunshop said about 100 rounds of round nose ball should break in my handgun, but i have been getting good deals on a box here and there of Winchester 180 GR. FMJ target range ammo and already have 100 rounds of it.

    Are there any advantages to using round nose ball cartridges as the guy said, or will the FMJ be fine?
    Jacketed ammo is jacketed ammo BUT some individual guns feed some bullet profiles better than others. The most popular 2 bullet shapes you find in jacketed practice ammo is jacketed round nose (ala' military ball) and a jacketed truncated cone (the ones with the flat tip). Both are 'Full Metal Jacket' ammo, they just have different profiles. Head over to the website of some of the bullet mold manufacturers like Lyman or LEE Precision and look up the different lead bullet profiles. You can find almost all of them (Except probably the wad cutter or the hollow-based wad cutter, I've never seen a jacketed wad cutter of any kind) in a jacketed format from one manufacturer or another.

    The idea of buying new self defense ammo every 6 months is amusing to me and I bet the owner of your local gun shop loves seeing you come through the door. Let's say he orders your favorite self defense ammunition by the case (1000 rounds), which is one of the normal amounts to order ammo in and you buy 50 rounds every 6 months. If he doesn't sell all that he has on hand of that particular load, he's not going to order any more. That means if you come in January 2 and buy 50 rounds and then come back July 2 and buy another 50 rounds, the ammo is from the same case lot and is the same age.

    Unless your normally carry your ammunition exposed to the elements in tanned leather loops (non nickel plated ammo will develop verdigris in leather loops from the chemicals used in the tanning process) or you routinely dunk your carry gun in a vat of WD-40 (which will penetrate the cartridge and make the powder and primer inert), there's little chance of it going bad in such a little time. I've fired ammunition that was made for WWI and black powder ammunition that was made in the 19th Century that all worked as advertised.

  5. Quote Originally Posted by utimmer43 View Post
    Yes, just like anything else in our lives, it is a personal choice. But given that most people choose to store their surplus ammo in a humidity controlled environment, it seems a little silly to overlook or dismiss the affects that CCing may have on the ammo that you are trusting your life with.
    That's why I hand load my own SD ammo. I don't trust my life to some big ammo factory that makes 1,000's of rounds every day.

    There, I just had to start one more argument in this thread! I'm off to start the popcorn popping now!

  6. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Desert Dude View Post
    Thanks GF, I should have given a bit more info. Let's say I go to the range and shoot 50 or so RNL from my Glock 30. Before I go home I shoot, say 10 factory ball ammo rounds it. Will this clean some of the lead out? I know there is no replacement of the good old bore brush and solvent scrubbing. Thanks again.

    Having seen first hand a G21 literally blow up because of lead fouling in the barrel, I wouldn't suggest firing any exposed lead bullets through a Glock pistol. With that said, I know of at least 3 Glock owners who do exactly as you described with their Glock pistols. They do a thorough cleaning using a solvent that removes the lead residue approx. once a month. They haven't experienced any problems with their guns. Knowing what my owner's manual says, I cannot in good conscience recommend a practice that goes contrary to the manufacturer's recommendations.

    The decision is up to you, given the "unscientific" info I've provied and your personal experiences.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  7. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Having seen first hand a G21 literally blow up because of lead fouling in the barrel, I wouldn't suggest firing any exposed lead bullets through a Glock pistol. With that said, I know of at least 3 Glock owners who do exactly as you described with their Glock pistols. They do a thorough cleaning using a solvent that removes the lead residue approx. once a month. They haven't experienced any problems with their guns. Knowing what my owner's manual says, I cannot in good conscience recommend a practice that goes contrary to the manufacturer's recommendations.

    The decision is up to you, given the "unscientific" info I've provied and your personal experiences.



    gf


    Would i need to use anything besides my M Pro 7 to get lead out of my barrel if i need to or is it sufficient in cleaning my barrel?

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by 901-Memphis View Post
    Would i need to use anything besides my M Pro 7 to get lead out of my barrel if i need to or is it sufficient in cleaning my barrel?
    Read the label and see if it says anything about removing lead fouling. If you never fire lead out of your Glock, then you'll have nothing to worry about.

    You'll see the silver/gray streaks of lead going down the rifling in the barrel if there is any lead residue.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  9. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Read the label and see if it says anything about removing lead fouling. If you never fire lead out of your Glock, then you'll have nothing to worry about.

    You'll see the silver/gray streaks of lead going down the rifling in the barrel if there is any lead residue.



    gf

    The gun i am going to get is very similar to the glock, its the S&W "glock clone" The SW40VE. It has nearly identical internals but it uses a different type of rifling in the barrel and has a fully supported chamber, so i am not sure if it accepts lead rounds any better than the glock.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by theicemanmpls View Post
    . I fired off an e-mail to the nice folks at the federal ammo factory. Lets see what they say.
    Here is the answer I received. I should comment, that federal does sell ammo. I am going with the one year cycle myself.
    RE: Federal Premium - Ask the Expert Form

    It all depends! A safe estimate for shelf life on ammunition is ten
    years. However, if the rounds constantly change elements(going from hot
    to cold and vice versa), or could possibly become contaminated(moisture,
    oil or ammonia based chemicals nearby), or continuous
    chambering/extraction of a round without firing it could all shorten the
    life span.

    Most LE departments recommend changing out ammunition at least once a
    year but personally I believe the 90day rule is optimum.

    Thanks,

    Federal Ammunition

  11. #30
    Then again i haven't heard the best things from Federal ammo to begin with. Maybe its just their ammo they want you to switch out every 90 days.

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