Using FMJ for breaking in new handgun? - Page 5
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Thread: Using FMJ for breaking in new handgun?

  1. #41
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    Here is more info about reloads in Glocks. It's call Glock KB kb=ka boom

    Glock kB! FAQ v1.35

  2.   
  3. So, basically, a Glock can blow up for a variety of reasons, pretty much at any time.... hmmmm.... I just don't really see the desire to own one.... and this is coming from a guy that carries a Taurus!

  4. #43
    Glocks just have the partially supported chamber, which leaves a small spot exposed to the pressure.

    The S&W gun i am getting has a fully supported chamber, i wonder if i can use reloads with it?

  5. looks like i'll be using only factory ammo in my glock. i could shoot handloads but that would mean i would have to change out my barrel. thanks " the icemanmpls" for the link

  6. #45
    Hopefully my taxes go in Friday morning (in a few hours) and i will be taking a trip down to budsgunshop in lexington to pick up a S&W Sigma .40

    Will be getting some more FMJ or any inexpensive range ammo and some hollow points for self defense too.

  7. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLT View Post
    So, basically, a Glock can blow up for a variety of reasons, pretty much at any time.... hmmmm.... I just don't really see the desire to own one.... and this is coming from a guy that carries a Taurus!
    If I were going to be in a firefight, and I had to choose only one pistol, it would be a glock 17C.

  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by theicemanmpls View Post
    Three to six months replace your carry rounds? Why? Ammo lasts a very long, long time. Longer if kept in a low humidity, in a household environment.
    May I ask where you get your info?
    I had the same reaction???? I sent emails to Remington, Federal, and Hornady and got the same answer from all. 10 years if stored in normal conditions. Dry and out of direct sunlight.

    I asked if the issue of vibration could cause the powder charge to break up into smaller parts and cause an increase in pressure and the answer to that was yes it could be a concern, but under normal conditions (i.e. carry each day, some transportation in a vehicle) it would take 10 years or so to cause that kind of degradation.

    The only issue to keep a close eye on is a bullet that gets shorter. I'll explain...

    When you load an automatic and chamber the first round, load from the magazine not by hand directly into the chamber. If you insert the magazine and just pull down on the slide release allowing the slide to come full force forward, it jams the round into the chamber with some force. If you continue to use the same round as the first one in, it may get shorter due to the projectile getting pushed into the cartridge. Rotate the ammo and don't use the same round as the first one in. If possible when chambering the first round use your hand and allow the slide to close lightly. It does less damage to the ammo. I have tried this at the range w/ my M&P45 and it goes bang so not a seating issue. The slide has to be at least a 1/4 inch back to disable it from firing (tested this with dummy ammo) Try with your carry piece and ammo to make sure.

    One thing for sure...Never use WD40 on ammo at all. It will neutralize primers.

    Keep your powder dry and keep 'em in the 10 ring...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  9. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by 6shootercarry View Post
    I had the same reaction???? I sent emails to Remington, Federal, and Hornady and got the same answer from all. 10 years if stored in normal conditions. Dry and out of direct sunlight.

    I asked if the issue of vibration could cause the powder charge to break up into smaller parts and cause an increase in pressure and the answer to that was yes it could be a concern, but under normal conditions (i.e. carry each day, some transportation in a vehicle) it would take 10 years or so to cause that kind of degradation.

    The only issue to keep a close eye on is a bullet that gets shorter. I'll explain...

    When you load an automatic and chamber the first round, load from the magazine not by hand directly into the chamber. If you insert the magazine and just pull down on the slide release allowing the slide to come full force forward, it jams the round into the chamber with some force. If you continue to use the same round as the first one in, it may get shorter due to the projectile getting pushed into the cartridge. Rotate the ammo and don't use the same round as the first one in. If possible when chambering the first round use your hand and allow the slide to close lightly. It does less damage to the ammo. I have tried this at the range w/ my M&P45 and it goes bang so not a seating issue. The slide has to be at least a 1/4 inch back to disable it from firing (tested this with dummy ammo) Try with your carry piece and ammo to make sure.

    One thing for sure...Never use WD40 on ammo at all. It will neutralize primers.

    Keep your powder dry and keep 'em in the 10 ring...

    The bullet getting pushed back into the case is called "set back". This condition could cause excessive pressures when the cartridge is fired.

    Certain models of firearms may become damaged if a cartridge is placed into the chamber as described above. Though easier on an unfired cartridge, the practice can chip extractors and may cause the firearm to malfunction at a critical time. Check your owner's manual for your firearm and/or consult the manufacturer if in doubt.

    Most semi-auto firearms are designed to load a cartridge from the magazine, and need the force from the slide to properly seat the cartridge. Testing with a dummy cartridge will not necessarily guarantee that the firearm will seat a live cartridge properly. Slight differences in bullet weight, shape, cartridge length, etc, could make a difference and cause your semi-auto to malfunction.

    IMO, I'd rather fire off the carry ammo every so often then risk damage to my firearm and/or malfunction at a critical time.

    WD40 is not something I'll use with any of my firearms. There are many who may disagree. That's their option. I've soaked ammo in WD40, and it still went bang. Having heard that there is a remote possiblity that the WD40 MAY damage my ammo, I choose to not take that chance.




    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    The bullet getting pushed back into the case is called "set back". This condition could cause excessive pressures when the cartridge is fired.

    Certain models of firearms may become damaged if a cartridge is placed into the chamber as described above. Though easier on an unfired cartridge, the practice can chip extractors and may cause the firearm to malfunction at a critical time. Check your owner's manual for your firearm and/or consult the manufacturer if in doubt.

    Most semi-auto firearms are designed to load a cartridge from the magazine, and need the force from the slide to properly seat the cartridge. Testing with a dummy cartridge will not necessarily guarantee that the firearm will seat a live cartridge properly. Slight differences in bullet weight, shape, cartridge length, etc, could make a difference and cause your semi-auto to malfunction.

    IMO, I'd rather fire off the carry ammo every so often then risk damage to my firearm and/or malfunction at a critical time.

    WD40 is not something I'll use with any of my firearms. There are many who may disagree. That's their option. I've soaked ammo in WD40, and it still went bang. Having heard that there is a remote possiblity that the WD40 MAY damage my ammo, I choose to not take that chance.




    gf
    Using the magazine is the only way to chamber the first round. The round comes up from the magazine and as the slide comes forward the round is positioned in front of the breech face and the extractor engages the rim as the bullet is going into the chamber. If the round is first placed into the chamber or breech and the slide is allowed to come forward into place, the extractor can damage the rim of the cartridge and can be damaged by the cartridge as well.

    Where I mention the use of hand and lightly. I meant to pull the slide back by hand and allow it to come forward with the tension of the recoil spring seating the round in the chamber. Not allowing it to come forward full force.

    The test I did with the 1/4 back on the slide using dummy rounds was to determine how far back the slide would have to be from the forward and locked position to disable the firearm. Since I had my hand on the front of the slide I decided dummy ammo would be the safest bet. I wanted to know if I had one thrust in my face and it was a life and death decision using my hand to grab the slide, how far back does one have to move the slide to disable it. Same way grabbing the cylinder of a revolver with the hammer still down will prevent it from firing. Kinda one of those what if tests.

    The test at the range was chambering the first round w/ live ammo using my procedure of hand on the slide when it comes forward and allowing the spring to seat the first round, not pulling back on the slide from the rear then letting go and allowing it to come full force forward. I just wanted to make sure it would seat the round, lock the slide and barrel, and allow me to fire. It worked fine with my gun. I know it's designed to chamber the next round off the top of the magazine at full force, but my intent was to check that when I chamber the first round manually and do so lightly to avoid set back or other round damage I will get a BANG when I need it..

    It's all good information. No hostility here GF, just clarifying my procedures and why I was testing it. I am a software QA test engineer and have worked in failure analysis. I have to figure out how it works and then figure out how it could break... My nature..

    Peace..
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

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