Trigger Pull And Finger Placement - Page 2
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Thread: Trigger Pull And Finger Placement

  1. #11
    wolfhunter Guest
    Mom, yes, for lefties flip the causes 180 leaving the 12 and 6 o'clock entries the same.

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  3. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by wolfhunter View Post
    Mom, yes, for lefties flip the causes 180 leaving the 12 and 6 o'clock entries the same.
    Thanks, wolf. That's what I thought...just common sense, I guess!
    Conservative Wife & Mom -- I'm a Conservative Christian-American with dual citizenship...the Kingdom of God is my 1st home and the U.S.A. is my 2nd.

  4. #13
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  5. Quote Originally Posted by ronwill View Post
    I have seen quite a few posts concerning shooting high or low, to the left or right. Of course one of the first things to look at is how you're sighting the target. I believe another primary concern is finger placement and trigger pull. Some believe that the index finger pad is the best position and I tend to disagree. I have found that the separating line between the first and second pads ( I guess it's called the power crease by some and the distal joint of the finger on the palmar side by professionals) gives a straighter more even pull, especially on longer pull firearms. Give it a try and see what you think. Any other points or suggestions to help?
    I use both techniques. It depends on the action of the gun.

    I use the pad of my fingertip when shooting single action semi autos and rifles. I feel I have a better feel for the trigger (and thus better control) using the pad alone when using these types of guns.

    All of my single action wheel guns are Italian made Colt SAA clones or Italian made Colt percussion clones. All of them have the trigger offset to the left side when the gun is held in a shooting position to make it easier for right handed shooters to use them. Unfortunately, I shoot pistols LEFT handed. To overcome the offset, I use the crease of the first joint of my trigger finger instead of the pad.

    For double action guns, I use the crease of the first joint. Shooting a revolver DA necessitates more hand strength to pull a trigger with a 8 to 12 pound resistance through the full stroke and a hooking the tip of my finger completely over the trigger face give me more leverage than just the tip.

    As for shotguns, I really don't pay any attention to finger placement when using them. I use more of a 'point at it and mash the trigger' technique for the shotgun but I don't do a lot of shotgun shooting.

  6. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Central N.Car.
    Posts
    534
    Growing up on a dirt road farm shooting squirrels with an old single shot 22 Remington did not teach me much other than not to miss. I shot using the crook of my finger because I did not know better or need to. When I started shooting comp. in the Corps my old master gunny outshot me all the time. In time I started listening and learning. He still outshot me but not by much and occasionally I would get in a better round than he. Just like most other things, there are tricks to every "trade". One of them is not putting any other pressure on the trigger than directly to the rear. Yep, now I use the pad and try to compensate for my lack of steadiness like I had in my youth.

  7. #16
    Just wanted to say that some experts use this technique also. Here's a good read for trigger control:

    http://uscca-downloads.s3.amazonaws....racySample.pdf

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    St Pete Beach, FL
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by jtg452 View Post
    I use both techniques. It depends on the action of the gun.

    I use the pad of my fingertip when shooting single action semi autos and rifles. I feel I have a better feel for the trigger (and thus better control) using the pad alone when using these types of guns.

    All of my single action wheel guns are Italian made Colt SAA clones or Italian made Colt percussion clones. All of them have the trigger offset to the left side when the gun is held in a shooting position to make it easier for right handed shooters to use them. Unfortunately, I shoot pistols LEFT handed. To overcome the offset, I use the crease of the first joint of my trigger finger instead of the pad.

    For double action guns, I use the crease of the first joint. Shooting a revolver DA necessitates more hand strength to pull a trigger with a 8 to 12 pound resistance through the full stroke and a hooking the tip of my finger completely over the trigger face give me more leverage than just the tip.

    As for shotguns, I really don't pay any attention to finger placement when using them. I use more of a 'point at it and mash the trigger' technique for the shotgun but I don't do a lot of shotgun shooting.
    Correct....
    Single action trigger (like 1911, with <1/2" of pull) uses the pad at the tip.
    Double action trigger (revolver or DAO semi-auto with >1/2" of pull) uses the groove of the first joint.

    Enjoy!

    Jeff

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