What would you do? - Page 3
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Thread: What would you do?

  1. #21
    I'm overly aware most of the time and I preach it like I want to keep it from going out of style. Well, I am actually. I friggin Love Samurai's quote and could picture me saying the EXCACT same thing.

    I grinned and said, "They would not have pistol whipped me..."

    Hahaha, classic man.
    Unapologetic American
    NRA/IDPA/USPSA/GSSF

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  3. #22
    Situational Awareness must always be in the front of your mind. That said, I agree I would not have been pistol whipped either.

  4. When I'm not working, and carrying a gun, I will do everything short of fellatio to avoid an armed encounter.

    IN SHORT I LEAVE THE EGO AT HOME!
    You want my parking spot? No problem. I will smile and gladly give it to you to keep from having to shoot you. Remember this, you can never call a bullet back and your local prosecuter determines what the law is. What is "justified" in one area may not be in another.

    Armed Robbery on the other hand is a different story. The badguy has means, motive and opportunity to cause your death. I would respond appropriately.

    Some of you may see this as being "weak". I see it as being smart. When you draw your gun or shoot someone the consequenses are sometimes horrible. You just have to determine if being dead is more horrible? To me it is.

    Biker
    Last edited by BikerRN; 02-14-2008 at 12:31 PM.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    Good point Biker. I'm quick to find the exit whenever possible. Unless I'm backed into a corner, I find that the simple solution would be to find another parking spot.


    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  6. #25
    I would have ramed my way out of there,filed a police report,and let insurance fix my car.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by UltraRick View Post
    Situational Awareness must always be in the front of your mind. That said, I agree I would not have been pistol whipped either.
    I completely agree.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    Exiting the vehicle for any reason is a bad idea. Blow the horn, ram the other car(s), fire through the windshield - whatever you need to do to get away. Don't stop running until you're sure of safety. These people were probably following this guy at least from the time he exited the mall, and possibly long before that. Unless you're not paying attention to anything, there's ample time to realize that you've seen the same car circle three times, and they seem to be interested in you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Glock Fan View Post
    Good point Biker. I'm quick to find the exit whenever possible.
    Ditto that. I go in the opposite direction from trouble, as quietly as possible. Some people call this "running away" - I prefer to think of it as "extraction".

    The closest I've ever gotten to being robbed is at a gas station a few years ago in the middle of the night. There were some bums hanging out under the front of the store. One of them came up to the car pretty aggressively and asked for money...I said, "Sure" and flung a pre-loaded handful of change at him while I jumped in the car. Then the other one came running next to the car asking if I wanted to buy some Valium. I left in a big noisy hurry and ran a red light on the way out.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  9. Quote Originally Posted by SigFan229R View Post
    I completely agree.
    that makes three

  10. Most of these answers are based on knowing the outcome of this particular incident.

    If the badguys were smart, they'd never let you know that they intended to pistol-whip you until you were out of your car asking politely what the problem was.

    THEN they pounce !

    It's too easy to say after the fact, that "I'd run the SOB over!" when at the time, you'd have no clue about their true intent.

    This makes another example of why a handgun on you beats the shotgun in the trunk.

    Once out of your car and once they show their weapon(s) it becomes an entirely different matter. At THAT point, I'd draw my gun and take command of the situation.

    If, on the other hand, they showed their weapons while I was still in the car, I'd use it to batter my way out.
    .

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    Quote Originally Posted by David E View Post
    Most of these answers are based on knowing the outcome of this particular incident.

    If the badguys were smart, they'd never let you know that they intended to pistol-whip you until you were out of your car asking politely what the problem was.
    The general rule of simply not getting out of the car to begin with isn't dependent on hindsight; it can be universally applied to many situations. By not getting out of the car, you have preserved a wider set of options - you can still get out at any time, or you can use the horn, use the car as a battering ram, etc. You can also still ask them what they want by rolling the window down and yelling, or using a PA system if you have one. Getting out of the car is an incredibly naive thing to do, and instantly decreases your available options.

    When I stop at a gas station, I make a complete circle around the pumps to get an idea of where everyone is, then select a pump and park there. I usually wait a minute before getting out, to watch people moving around in the area. If there's bums around or someone who looks like they might cause trouble, I never even get out of the car - I find another gas station.

    The same goes for watching what's going on when you leave any building, whether it's the mall, your house, or your workplace. Be as careful as you need to be - don't just go charging out to your car with tunnel vision. Watch for people and cars that don't belong or are behaving in a suspicious way.

    It's a shame this isn't taught in schools or something. One would almost conclude they're training children to become victims. :huh:
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

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