State Department Squirms On Garand And Carbine Imports
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Thread: State Department Squirms On Garand And Carbine Imports

  1. #1
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    State Department Squirms On Garand And Carbine Imports

    NRA-ILA :: State Department Squirms On Garand And Carbine Imports

    State Department Squirms On Garand And Carbine Imports

    Friday, September 03, 2010


    A lot of things have changed in the federal government since President Harry S. Truman put his famous "the buck stops here" sign on his desk. This week, Fox News reported that it couldn't get a straight answer from the State Department about its decision in March to disapprove the importation of more than 800,000 M1 Garand rifles and M1 carbines from South Korea.

    According to Fox, the State Department claimed that the rifles might be used "for illicit purposes." But when asked to explain, State passed the buck to the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which passed it to the Department of Justice, which passed it back to State.

    The anti-gun Brady Campaign didn't hesitate to give Fox an answer, however. "Guns that can take high-capacity magazines are a threat to public safety," the group's Dennis Henigan told reporter Maxim Lott.

    Of course, Henigan's response was factually flawed. The M1 Garand does not "take" a "high-capacity" magazine; its magazine is built in, and holds only eight rounds. That's three fewer than the 11 rounds necessary for a magazine to be restricted as a "large capacity" magazine under California's law, which the Brady Campaign calls a "model for the nation," or the federal ban of 1994-2004 (which the group still advocates as a fall-back position in the event that Congress doesn't impose something more severe).

    Since sales of imported firearms are subject to the national instant background check, Henigan's position was also hypocritical. To justify not letting the M1s and carbines into the U.S., Henigan essentially took the position that the instant check is not enough to protect public safety. But at other times, Brady takes the position that public safety requires us to impose the same instant checks on sales of firearms by people who are not dealers.

    Finally, the "public safety" fear of these guns is irrational. Today, Americans own more Garands and carbines than ever before. We also own more semi-automatic rifles in general than ever before, and more self-defense handguns with standard magazines that hold more than 10 rounds than ever before. Yet despite gun ban groups' predictions, the nation's violent crime rate is at a 35-year low.
    USAF Retired, CATM, SC CWP, NH NR CWP, NRA Benefactor
    To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them... -- Richard Henry Lee, 1787

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  3. #2
    I find "Illicit" to be one of the most annoying and frustrating words in the English language. Any word that vague and emotionally charged has no place in any type of legislation.

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by father-of-three View Post
    I find "Illicit" to be one of the most annoying and frustrating words in the English language. Any word that vague and emotionally charged has no place in any type of legislation.
    Indeed. That word used to describe an object or activity is a result of legislation, not an inherent property of an object or action.

  5. #4
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    I thibk the current admin doesn't want the public have any more weapons what so ever. The Garand is a great rfile, is it an assault weapon, no, can it be easily hidden, no. Do it require ammo that is made in enemy countries, no.

    This is more stupidity, because if the U.S. doesn't buy them, then some one else will snap them up and they may be used against us.

    Jerry
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    North American Hunting Club Life Member
    Crossbow Nation

  6. #5
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    The news article is about antique riffles. I personally don't think they should be banned, although 800 thousand rifles could make the market value drop. Look up [Springfield Armory M1A rifle] on the internet, they have plenty of new M1A rifles for sale if you have enough money to buy one with. Maybe the old rifles were affordable and that is why Pres. Obama does not want them to be sold here.
    Rugers Mini-14 and Mini-30 are built on the M1A grand patent. I have a mini-30. I wish I could afford to buy a M1A Grand.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by TooCalm View Post
    ...800 thousand rifles could make the market value drop.
    Let's hope so...!!
    NRA Life; GOA Life; CCRKBA Life; Trustee, NJCSD; F&AM: 32 & KT
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  8. #7
    The M-1 Garand would make an excellent all-around hunting rifle, IMHO. The 30-06 being an excellent general use cartridge. Also the Garand can be rechambered in other calibers if that suits your intended aplication.

    I personally have been eyeing an M-1 Carbine myself.

  9. #8
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    Their arguments about rifles with more firepower is full of holes. My old Winchester 100 with proper mags, 7400s, 742s, and M1A have more. They are a fine example of the change in battle rifle design. I do not have one but it is on "the list". Another '06 just whets my appetite--lol.

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