What if you saw a Law Enforcement Officer in Trouble? - Page 18
Page 18 of 28 FirstFirst ... 81617181920 ... LastLast
Results 171 to 180 of 277

Thread: What if you saw a Law Enforcement Officer in Trouble?

  1. Congrads to all that would help. I think as being old enough to help I would (69) Any officer in trouble could use my help to regain his footing would have it. Maybe we have too many of the other people.

  2.   
  3. #172
    Quote Originally Posted by bigotist View Post
    if it's a cop, with the majority being lowlifes, my weapon would remain holstered and i would go on about my business. Their sht don't stink when it's the other way around!!!
    ~i carry a gun, because a cop is too heavy~
    dnftt

  4. #173
    Quote Originally Posted by 384540 View Post
    Congrads to all that would help. I think as being old enough to help I would (69) Any officer in trouble could use my help to regain his footing would have it. Maybe we have too many of the other people.
    That or there are "too many people" like me. I'm not going to risk my family's safety and I really don't want my child growing up with his dad in prison.

    Besides, there is something that very few are considering here. What if the LEO is in the wrong? I know several and they are all good guys but there are a few bad apples. Remember Murphy's law.

  5. #174
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SE Florida
    Posts
    1,880
    Quote Originally Posted by SC Tiger View Post
    That or there are "too many people" like me. I'm not going to risk my family's safety and I really don't want my child growing up with his dad in prison.

    Besides, there is something that very few are considering here. What if the LEO is in the wrong? I know several and they are all good guys but there are a few bad apples. Remember Murphy's law.
    As I said before in this thread, I really hope you never find yourself in a critical situation and somebody who could help you says "Sorry pal, I'd help but I don't want to risk it. Good luck!" and then keeps walking.

    If that did happen to you, what would your reaction be?? Would you smile back at him, wave and say "No problem. Thanks anyway!" and then go back to your potentially life-or-death situation?? I hardly think so.
    (Insert random tough-guy quote here)
    "See my gun?? Aren't you impressed?" - Anonymous sheepdog
    The hardware is the same, but the software is vastly different.

  6. #175
    For ijon

    If you stop to help an officer who is being assaulted and you feel he/she is losing the battle I would strongly suggest that you do not unholster your firearm and tell the "bad Guy" to stop. He has already become involved in an altercation with a uniformed armed officer. When you unholster your pistol you present another opportunity for the "bad guy" to acquire a firearm.

    My strong suggestion is that you take off your shoe and try a couple of sharp hits to the bad guys head. If the officers baton ( or night stick as they use to call it) is on the ground use it against the bad guy.

    I would hate for you to have your own personal handgun to be used against you. The "bad guy" is on a mission to escape being arrested. He will hurt you just as he is hurting the downed officer.

    thanks

    I am open for responses
    Pat Olvey, Cincinnati, Ohio
    Hamilton County
    email [email protected]

  7. #176
    Quote Originally Posted by FN1910 View Post
    dnftt
    As you know from your studies law enforcement has the obligation to enforce two types of laws, in latin (I hope I am spelling correctly) they are Mala In Se and Mala Prohibita. Mala In Se are those crimes that are evil in themselves such as murder and rape, Mala Prohibilta are those items like speeding and being drunk and disorderly.

    Some of the guys out on the street (officers) would really prefer to be eating donuts and drinking coffee instead of fighting with someone who has broken a law.

    Those of us who have remained in law enforcement (Jan of 1963 for myself) have performed many necessary tasks in order to make society safe for everyone. I am sorry for the families of the officers who have died on duty trying to arrest someone and no one would help them.

    Citizens are actually walking past women being assaulted and older people are being beat up and robbed. No one is helping them.

    Society is what you make it.

    Personally I am a bible toting pistol carrying person, should you want a bible to read please go to any church and I am sure they will give you one or you can go to the library and read it there.

    Your thoughts
    Pat Olvey, Cincinnati, Ohio
    Hamilton County
    email [email protected]

  8. #177
    Quote Originally Posted by ohio pat View Post
    For ijon

    If you stop to help an officer who is being assaulted and you feel he/she is losing the battle I would strongly suggest that you do not unholster your firearm and tell the "bad Guy" to stop. He has already become involved in an altercation with a uniformed armed officer. When you unholster your pistol you present another opportunity for the "bad guy" to acquire a firearm.

    My strong suggestion is that you take off your shoe and try a couple of sharp hits to the bad guys head. If the officers baton ( or night stick as they use to call it) is on the ground use it against the bad guy.

    I would hate for you to have your own personal handgun to be used against you. The "bad guy" is on a mission to escape being arrested. He will hurt you just as he is hurting the downed officer.

    thanks

    I am open for responses
    What about the officers taser,then the BG can scream "Don't tase me bro" LOL.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  9. That "hit him with a shoe" bit was a joke, right?

    If I DO decide to mix in, I'll use the most powerful and effective weapon at my disposal, gun, car, whatever will best do the job. And trust me, if I pull a pistol, I'll shoot it dry before I let anyone take it from me. But I'm NOT going to mix in unless I am ABSOLUTELY CERTAIN who is the Bad Guy. This is 2011, not 1963; a uniform does not guarantee it's a Good Guy. Heck, it doesn't necessarily guarantee it's a cop (I'm not a cop, and I buy from Gall's and L.A. Police Supply). I've seen outstanding Good Guy cops, and vicious psychopath cops. I'm just not going to mix in unless I'm certain of who is in the right and I believe the cause is worth risking my life, my family's future, and everything that I have and will have.
    “The police of a State should never be stronger or better armed than the citizenry. An armed citizenry, willing to fight is the foundation of civil freedom.” Heinlein

  10. #179
    Quote Originally Posted by ohio pat View Post
    As you know from your studies law enforcement has the obligation to enforce two types of laws, in latin (I hope I am spelling correctly) they are Mala In Se and Mala Prohibita. Mala In Se are those crimes that are evil in themselves such as murder and rape, Mala Prohibilta are those items like speeding and being drunk and disorderly.

    Some of the guys out on the street (officers) would really prefer to be eating donuts and drinking coffee instead of fighting with someone who has broken a law.

    Those of us who have remained in law enforcement (Jan of 1963 for myself) have performed many necessary tasks in order to make society safe for everyone. I am sorry for the families of the officers who have died on duty trying to arrest someone and no one would help them.

    Citizens are actually walking past women being assaulted and older people are being beat up and robbed. No one is helping them.

    Society is what you make it.

    Personally I am a bible toting pistol carrying person, should you want a bible to read please go to any church and I am sure they will give you one or you can go to the library and read it there.

    Your thoughts
    The problem with society is a large distrust for officers. The actions of a few(should say MANY) have show a large part of society that officers can no loner be the one person you can always trust. Not all officers fall into this category(Most do not, or are able to keep their misdeeds under the table).

    People have heard about police corruption for decades, but have never seen it with their own eyes. Till the night of March 2nd 1990. The reputation of the police has been going down hill ever since then. Kids are no longer told " The one person you can always trust are cops". In some colored neighborhoods they are told to run when they see police coming(even if they did nothing wrong). People of other races don't fair any better. Point in case look at the father who called 911 for help after he woke up and his daughter was gone(Kevin Fox). Instead of going after the killer and following the evidence, the police instead chose to take the easy way out and frame the father for the killing/rape of his child. After 14 1/2 hours they got him to say what they needed to convict of the crime. Eight months later he was found to be Innocent, after DNA testing cleared him. Testing the police ordered STOPPED after they framed the crime on him.

    The mother of a 3-year-old whose 2004 rape and murder sparked a media furor said she hopes prosecutors seek the death penalty for the slaying of her daughter, Riley Fox.

    Melissa Fox said she will attend every trial proceeding for Scott Wayne Eby, the imprisoned sex offender who was charged Thursday with Riley's death. She also said she'd be pleased with a guilty verdict that leads to a sentence of life in prison without parole.

    "I'll be at anything and everything I can be at, because I feel that's my way of being able to stand up for Riley," Melissa Fox told the Chicago Tribune. "I'm not afraid of him or afraid of seeing him. ... I want to be there."

    Eby, 38, was charged with first-degree murder and predatory criminal sexual assault of a child in the 2004 death of Riley Fox, who vanished from her home and whose body was later found in a creek four miles away.

    According to the criminal complaint, the 6-foot-2, 230-pound Eby held the bound girl under water until she drowned.

    Will County State's Attorney James Glasgow has said he has four months to decide whether to seek the death penalty against Eby, who is serving seven-year prison sentences on each of two unrelated Will County convictions of criminal sexual assault.

    The little girl's death gained widespread media attention, both during the search in Wilmington, where authorities say Eby lived, and after authorities accused her father, Kevin Fox.

    Kevin Fox was charged after he implicated himself under intense questioning. But he later said he only did so in exchange for leniency and after losing hope during an overnight interrogation that lasted more than 14 hours.

    He spent eight months in jail in the killing before DNA evidence showed he was not her killer and was eventually cleared.

    The parents were awarded more than $8 million in damages after they accused investigators of fabricating evidence.

    Melissa Fox called Thursday's charges "bittersweet" after waiting years to find out if anyone would be changed in the investigated.

    "I never thought I was going to hear those words," she said. "I was happy. I was sad. I was angry. It was unbelievable really, an unbelievable moment."

    Within an hour of finding the body of 3-year-old Riley Fox in a Wilmington creek, authorities pulled a pair of shoes from those waters. Written inside each was the last name of the man charged six years later with her murder.

    Police placed the shoes in evidence, but never pieced that lead together with other clues -- a call to police from the man's home and signs of a burglary preceding Riley's abduction -- that could have led them to Scott Wayne Eby in the hours and days after her sexual assault and slaying.

    Instead, Will County sheriff's detectives focused almost exclusively on Riley's father, Kevin. DNA evidence excluded Kevin Fox after he spent eight months in jail, but authorities didn't declare him innocent until last month, when Eby allegedly confessed to the slaying and the partial DNA sample from the crime scene matched his.

    "Looking at all of the information that we now have about Eby, he could have been apprehended the day after the murder, and he probably would have confessed," said attorney Kathleen Zellner, who won an $8 million federal civil court judgment on behalf of Kevin Fox and Riley's mother, Melissa.

    Investigators' photos and notes obtained by the Tribune, as well as interviews with people involved in the case, shed light on evidence made public for the first time Tuesday on chicagotribune.com.

    During the civil trial, an FBI agent testified that then-Sgt. Edward Hayes, who led the investigation, ordered that DNA testing be stopped after the arrest of Fox, who incriminated himself in a statement made after 14 hours of interrogation. The civil jury found Fox's statement was coerced and held Hayes and Deputy Scott Swearengen mainly responsible.

    Zellner, who compared the shoe evidence to "dropping your driver's license at the (crime) scene," also said police failed to search a forest preserve bathroom near the creek. Eby confessed to sexually assaulting Riley in that bathroom and disposing of her underpants in a nearby garbage can, she said.

    "There were probably five possibilities where Eby's name could have surfaced very early on during the investigation," she added. "I think it's an example of really shoddy police work."

    She also said that Eby, who lived about a mile from Riley at the time of her slaying, in December 2005 was convicted of sexually assaulting a relative. If police investigating Riley's killing had then obtained his DNA and compared it with the partial sample, that would have been key evidence against him, Zellner said.

    Pat Barry, spokesman for the Will County sheriff's department, declined comment on specific evidence, but reiterated the apology Sheriff Paul Kaupas gave last month.

    Kaupas said he's interviewing companies, whose employees include retired FBI agents and chiefs of police, to do an extensive review of the Riley Fox investigation.

    "There were some mistakes made in the case," Kaupas conceded. "That's what we're trying to avoid, any of these things (happening) in the future."

    He said investigators did swab "anybody and anything" for DNA after Riley's death, but did not specify when; a crime sample was identified in June 2005. But Kaupas also acknowledged that they did not search for people who lived in the Wilmington area at the time of the crime and later became sex offenders, which could have led to Eby. He said the sheriff's department didn't have enough personnel.

    Charles Pelkie, spokesman for State's Attorney James Glasgow, also declined comment. Glasgow freed Kevin Fox, who was charged under Glasgow's predecessor, and oversaw the investigation that eventually led to Eby.

    Henry Weidling, former volunteer director of the Wilmington Emergency Services and Disaster Agency, said he found a pair of white athletic shoes in the creek fewer than 100 yards from the crime scene and less than an hour after Riley's body was found on June 6, 2004. Weidling said the shoes looked like they hadn't been in the water long.

    Photographs of the shoes show "EBY" on the inside of their tongues, according to case documents. Although the name is hard to make out in the photos, handwritten police notes clearly note "EBY" and list the brand.

    Eby, who was on parole for burglary when Riley was killed, said during his confession that he discarded the shoes in the water when they became muddy after drowning Riley in a section of Forked Creek, Zellner said.

    The morning Riley went missing, Wilmington police were called by Eby's mother to their home for a "wellness check," Eby said during his confession, according to Zellner and Melissa Fox, who were both briefed by the FBI.

    Police were visiting Eby's home to see if he had "thoughts of suicide," said Chief Darin Plotts, one of two officers who responded.

    When police arrived, Eby, now 38, was agitated and vomiting. He asked police if they had found "that little girl yet," Melissa Fox said.

    Barry, of the sheriff's office, said many agencies had pieces of information about Eby, but "nobody put it together."

    "We don't have an answer for a lot of this stuff," Barry said. "There were definitely, definitely communication lapses. There were definitely things not done."

    Kaupas said his office never had contact with Eby. Wilmington police handled that aspect, he said.

    But James Metta, the chief at the time, said once her body was found and her death became a homicide investigation, he turned the case over to the sheriff's office.

    "Our part in it ended," said Metta, now living in Florida. "Our case was solved, unfortunately, by finding (Riley)."

    During his recorded confession last month, Eby said that before entering the Fox home, he burglarized a home across the street, where he cut a screen to gain entry to a patio door, Zellner said. That screen also was in evidence, but an evidence technician dismissed the cut as storm damage, records show.

    Melissa Fox said the shoe evidence, combined with the other details, should have led police straight to Eby, not her husband.

    "It's amazing to me," she said, referring to the shoes. "They had the evidence to solve the crime within the first 24 hours. It's all right there."

    She said that Swearengen, who testified at trial that he immediately suspected Kevin Fox, often told her the evidence would do justice for Riley.

    "The evidence has spoken," Melissa Fox said. "It's too bad that six years ago, he wasn't willing to listen."

    Scott Eby accepted a plea bargain today in the 2004 rape and murder of 3-year-old Riley Fox that spares him the death penalty but guarantees he spends the rest of his life in prison.

    Eby's plea deal hopefully gives some closure to Riley Fox's parents. Her father, Kevin Fox, was originally charged with the murder and spent eight months in jail until a federal appeals court threw out the charges after DNA testing exonerated him. Eby's sneakers, which had his last name stenciled inside, were found near the creek where Riley Fox's body was found floating, and still Will County investigators didn't pursue him as a suspect. It wasn't until an FBI tip that Eby was even considered a suspect.

    Kevin Fox and his now-estranged wife, Melissa, were awarded $8 million in a wrongful arrest federal lawsuit brought against Will County officials.

    Six years after their 3-year-old daughter was murdered, the Fox family finally received some closure in 2010.

    In November, Scott Wayne Eby pleaded guilty and was sentenced to life in prison without parole for the June 2004 murder of Riley Fox.

    “It’s an ugly chapter the State’s Attorney is pleased to close and hopefully give some closure to the Fox family and for all of Will County now that the real killer is behind bars,” said Charles Pelkie, spokesman for Will County State’s Attorney James Glasgow’s office on Wednesday.

    Eby pleaded guilty to five counts of first-degree murder and one count of predatory criminal sexual assault of a child.

    Fox was reported missing from her home on June 5, 2004, by her father, Kevin Fox, who later was charged with her murder. He spent eight months in jail before DNA evidence proved he was innocent.

    Results of an autopsy showed Fox, whose body was found in Forked Creek in Wilmington about three miles from her home, died of drowning by homicidal means.

    Fox’s body was found three days after her disappearance. According to Eby’s written confession, Eby had been drinking and using cocaine the day of the murder. He said this prompted him to break into the Fox home, take Fox and sexually assault her.

    With a bandanna hiding his face, Eby put the little girl in the trunk of his car and drove to a nearby forest preserve. He bound her wrists and mouth with duct tape and sexually assaulted her in a men’s restroom.

    Because his bandanna slipped, Eby was afraid Fox could identify him so he took her to Forked Creek and held her under the water until she stopped struggling, Eby wrote in the letter.

    The Fox family was in support of Eby receiving a life sentence.

    “It was what the family wanted. They did not want to go through the emotional turmoil of a lengthy trial and with the conviction and sentencing, what could possibly be years, possibly decades (if they went for the death penalty),” said Pelkie.

    Fox’s mother, Melissa Fox, addressed Eby in her victim impact statement read in court last month.

    “I feel that if I have to live the rest of my life with the pain you have inflicted, you should have to live the rest of your life labeled as a child killer,” she said. “I’m opposed to you getting the death penalty and dying a quick, painless death."

    LONG ROAD

    Glasgow inherited the Fox case from his predecessor who originally charged Kevin Fox, Fox’s father, with his daughter’s murder. Kevin Fox spent eight months in jail awaiting trial until he was cleared of the crime with DNA evidence.

    Fox and his wife were awarded $12.2 million in damages after accusing Will County investigators of fabricating evidence. The amount was later reduced to $8.6 million.

    When Glasgow took over, he ordered the DNA test. Upon receiving the results, he dismissed the charges and released Kevin Fox from jail on June 17, 2005.

    During the investigation, a pair of Eby’s shoes with his name written on them were found along the creek and were collected as evidence. Eby wore the shoes when he killed Fox and removed the shoes when they became covered in mud. The shoes weren’t linked until years later.

    In addition, Eby was also interviewed by Will County detectives, who interviewed neighbors during the investigation, but he was not made a suspect.

    In 2009, Glasgow brought in the FBI to assist with the case. FBI agents interviewed Eby in Lawrenceville Correction Center, where he was serving time for an unrelated sexual assault that occurred after Fox was murdered. During the interview, Eby agreed to supply a DNA sample and was later charged when results came back conclusive.

    “Eby will be behind bars for the rest of his life, where he’ll never be able to prey on another innocent child,” said Pelkie.
    Can you really blame a person for having distrust of the police?

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  11. #180
    I think it is very sad that society has come to distrust the police so much, simply because of the actions of a few bad cops. And yes, I maintain that it is a few. There are over 800,00 law enforcement officers in the united states. I agree that criminals deserve arrest, prosecution, and imprisonment whether they wear a badge or not.

    As for myself, I feel that I was a good cop. I tried to enforce and uphold the law evenly, and I did what I could to prevent crime and help the community around me. I wasn't dishonest. I didn't beat innocent victims. I didn't steal from people. I didn't abuse my authority. But, I was still mistrusted by many people, and not just the criminal element. However, I would still do whatever I could to help them. If it were me in trouble and you simply walked by without helping, the human being within me would be calling you every name in the book. The police officer in me would still do my job to help you should the need arise.

    People like those of you who would turn a blind eye make me sick.

Page 18 of 28 FirstFirst ... 81617181920 ... LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Hollow Point Question
    By MateMike in forum New Jersey Discussion and Firearm News
    Replies: 44
    Last Post: 04-04-2017, 10:17 PM
  2. Replies: 301
    Last Post: 03-08-2015, 06:53 PM
  3. Travel to Ohio from MA
    By DickL in forum Ohio Discussion and Firearm News
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 01-05-2011, 03:07 AM
  4. Does CWP cover knives...
    By cha2ga in forum South Carolina Discussion and Firearm News
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 03-23-2010, 04:16 PM
  5. H 3003 In House Judiciary Committee
    By Red Hat in forum South Carolina Discussion and Firearm News
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-30-2009, 03:43 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast