How do you train? - Page 2
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 26

Thread: How do you train?

  1. #11
    I'll set up some paper plates and practice between 5-10 yards. I practice pulling my gun from its carry position and fire a couple at a time, never looking at anything but the paper plates.

    I don't care what anyone says, when you-know-what hits the fan, you're eyes will be locked on that bad guy. Won't be looking for any sights, lasers, lights, etc.

    It's muscle memory practice and your hand and arm will know when you're on target. Sorta like the Sundance Kid's school of self defense.

  2.   
  3. Quote Originally Posted by tomwalshco View Post
    I'll set up some paper plates and practice between 5-10 yards. I practice pulling my gun from its carry position and fire a couple at a time, never looking at anything but the paper plates.

    I don't care what anyone says, when you-know-what hits the fan, you're eyes will be locked on that bad guy. Won't be looking for any sights, lasers, lights, etc.

    It's muscle memory practice and your hand and arm will know when you're on target. Sorta like the Sundance Kid's school of self defense.
    Not to change the topic of the thread, but point shooting is only half of the equation. I recently attended a combat focus shooting course. I trained with Robb Hamic, an accredited instructor of CFS. Rob Pincus is the founder of the Combat Focus Shooting program and I think you should check out some videos, and maybe even think of attending a class.

    I used to think that point shooting was garbage, that it was irresponsible and even unrealistic. I have since changed my opinion. One of the things that is taught in the CFS class is that your target dictates your need for precision. Your confidence and ability dictate your speed.


    CFS also recommends that you train in a variety of situations. From your post I gather that you only use point shooting. There are so many variables to where you may need to use precision shots to make combat effective hits.

    You'll get no argument from me that in a CQB encounter where you come home from work and some lunatic jumps out of your closet, damn straight your reaction is going to be 'Oh s*** WTF" pull your weapon and engage likely without looking at the sights.

    In any prolonged incident, lets say a verbal that escalates to a physical that escalates to someone shooting at YOU. I don't know about you but if I'm being shot at I'm going to scramble for cover. From behind cover I will then assess and re-engage as necessary. Possibly AT a target which is also behind cover, therefore bringing the need to use precision shots (sighted fire).
    Quick to the gun, Sure of your grip. Quick to the threat, sure of your shot. - Chris Costa

  4. #13
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    756
    I love the responses that I am getting here. What kind of training aside from quick draw, acquire, and fire can you do while at an indoor range? I ask because recently I went to an indoor range that allowed rapid fire, I shot from 7feet, 12 feet, 18 feet and 25 feet, I was surprised at my accuracy. I know that when SHTF I wont be so accurate, but I nailed almost every shot at an actual human size silhouette, everything from head shots, midchest, arms, legs etc, I hit what I was aiming at without any laser sites.
    I took my time most the time, and rapid fired when my friend brought the target at a "charging" speed.
    I then released a magazine, quickly through in another and continued. Turned that bad ol paper into swiss cheese.
    Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you, Jesus Christ and the American Soldier....One died for your soul; the other for your freedom.

  5. #14
    Gotcha, Clear.

    Practice facilities come into play as well. I'm lucky, joined a shooting club where I can get off by myself at any time inside or outside. 3 a.m. if I'm sleepless. Most people are restricted to crowded ranges - no fast draws, no double taps, no fast fires, cease fires, you're in a toll booth while the targets move in and out on a wire and a clothespin.

    When you practice point-shoot and other quick reaction stuff you'll be all over the place and you're buddies will make fun of you or the guy next stall over thinks you're the worst shot in the world. Ego crushing stuff. Most ranges cater to practice styles that are better suited for Olympic trial practice. Not whipping a 2" Kel-Tec outta your pocket at Quik Trip.

    That's why I never set foot in those joints anymore. It's just a waste of good ammo.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by tomwalshco View Post
    Gotcha, Clear.

    Practice facilities come into play as well. I'm lucky, joined a shooting club where I can get off by myself at any time inside or outside. 3 a.m. if I'm sleepless. Most people are restricted to crowded ranges - no fast draws, no double taps, no fast fires, cease fires, you're in a toll booth while the targets move in and out on a wire and a clothespin.

    When you practice point-shoot and other quick reaction stuff you'll be all over the place and you're buddies will make fun of you or the guy next stall over thinks you're the worst shot in the world. Ego crushing stuff. Most ranges cater to practice styles that are better suited for Olympic trial practice. Not whipping a 2" Kel-Tec outta your pocket at Quik Trip.

    That's why I never set foot in those joints anymore. It's just a waste of good ammo.
    Agreed, I am a member of a 24 hour club, any time on a large private berm. Urban Prone, crouch, rapid fire, from concealment, from the holster, etc. If anyone is stuck at a 'Stand and Deliver" only facility I strongly reccomend you seek alternatives. The only alternative may be taking advanced training so you'll just have to talk yourself into it (I know it'll be difficult to talk yourself into spending a day at the range having a good time with your firearm)
    Quick to the gun, Sure of your grip. Quick to the threat, sure of your shot. - Chris Costa

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Texas, for now
    Posts
    57
    Quote Originally Posted by ClearSightTactical View Post
    Agreed, I am a member of a 24 hour club, any time on a large private berm. Urban Prone, crouch, rapid fire, from concealment, from the holster, etc. If anyone is stuck at a 'Stand and Deliver" only facility I strongly reccomend you seek alternatives. The only alternative may be taking advanced training so you'll just have to talk yourself into it (I know it'll be difficult to talk yourself into spending a day at the range having a good time with your firearm)
    I agree with this too. None of the indoor ranges near me allow drawing from a holster. Some limit shot interval to no less than 1 second (WTF?).

    I Dry fire at home several times a week. I use a LaserLyte LT-Pro and that works ok (It a device that fits in the barrel, self centering, and shines a laser for 0.1 second when it hears the firing pin click. It's works ok, but I can't rack the slide normally or it will fly out of the barrel. LaserLyte has a new one that fits inside the barrel that is like a snapcap but shines the laser when you pull the trigger but is designed to without the rim so it won't be ejected during racking. It been announced but not sure that it's for sale yet. Look for LT-45, LT-9 or LT-40.

    At the range I mainly go to double check my dry fire, deal with recoil issues (I still flinch) and accuracy.

    I also shoot in some competitions - a USPSA deal with steels and a group near me for Springfield armory XD owners that does a competition monthly. My goal is not win (it'd be nice) - but to get practical practice in simulated stressful situations. Competitions are timed so you want to go fast but not hitting the target usually costs time penalties so you go as fast as you can and still be as accurate as you can. Still I time penalty is nothing like a miss that hits someone....

  8. #17
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    756
    The Advanced Ranges by me offers a defensive shooting class [4 hours for about 100 to 150 dollars] Im thinking about taking it up. I talked with the guy at the counter, he said they clear off the range of all tables and stuff like that, set up walls, and give you a stressful situation, put civilian targets up as well as BG targets. He said the lights kinda flicker, and youre forced to get from one side or the other in about 3 minutes and fire from several positions.
    I think this would be fun, but for a 4 hour class, I dont know if its going to be for me really. Might be worth checking it out though....Curiosity more than anything heh...
    Only two defining forces have ever offered to die for you, Jesus Christ and the American Soldier....One died for your soul; the other for your freedom.

  9. #18
    Classes are fine, taken a couple, but it seems as though over half the time is spent on gun safety (needed, of course, but I get it, thanks). Classes always seem to move at the pace of the slowest student.

    If my club went bust or the members voted me out because I was an a-hole, I'd probably put up some notes at hardware/feed stores in surrounding rural communities.

    "Myself and a couple of my mature friends...... would be willing to pay for the privilege, blah, blah....
    You set the days and hours, blah, blah...will keep the place neat and clean.... - call Nice Guy at 555-5555."


    Maybe try an ad in the local Penny Saver or Thrifty Nickel.
    Lots of empty farm land sitting around these days. You and your buds could have some fun and maybe learn some stuff along the way.

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    141
    Since my regular range does not allow drawing from holster to shoot, I sometimes go out to the desert to practice my drawing and other tactical situations.

  11. I am not going into details but having shot at someone I can tell you, IT IS TRAUMATIC!
    I practice all the time, in my sleep, if I can sleep, day time, at breakfast. I am always seeing the invisible guy. I had military training and it did not train me for this. I went to PTSD counciling for several years and still I have nightmares, most of someone chasing me and killing me. Be sure you are RIGHT before you shoot. It's bad enough taht everything is and worse if it isnt. Practice!

Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Guns on a Train!
    By CathyInBlue in forum Politics and News
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 01-03-2011, 07:46 AM
  2. Travel by Train
    By JJFlash in forum General Firearm Discussion
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 06-01-2010, 04:49 PM
  3. Bush and Obama together on a train.
    By NDS in forum Off-Topic
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 02-15-2010, 05:29 AM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 09-21-2009, 10:34 PM
  5. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-02-2008, 05:38 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast