Beretta PX4sc slide came off while shooting - Page 2
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Thread: Beretta PX4sc slide came off while shooting

  1. #11
    FWIW, I've got a Px4 Compact (not SubCompact) and the take-down lever is COMPLETELY different. Mine requires you to pull down on a small lever, on both sides of the frame, not turn anything or pull anything out. The lever is located where your trigger finger would rest when not on the trigger. I'm not sure what style the fullsize version has, but I thought it would be helpful to note that the Compact couldn't be effected by the same issue.
    HTH. Thanks for posting this info,
    Billy

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  3. #12
    I have a Glock 19 I bought in 1988 (several factory upgrades and free re-surface coating from Glock). It has always functioned flawlessly and I like the design of the Glock without the pin. I would still be carrying the 19 all the time if I hadn't gotten a 26 in 2002. A system to use when your life depends on it.

  4. #13
    I carried and shot many, many rounds through M9 Berettas in the Army. I didn't ever want to buy one for personal use. The M9 Berettas had problems wearing out rather quickly using the standard military 9mm ammo which I guess is or was a rather "hot" loaded round. I know personal service pistols are a point of personal preference but I guess Beretta just left a bad taste in my holster. This story isn't helping.

  5. #14
    Could you please expound what you mean when you say "M9 Berettas had problems wearing out": what wears out?

    Quote Originally Posted by disneyr View Post
    I carried and shot many, many rounds through M9 Berettas in the Army. I didn't ever want to buy one for personal use. The M9 Berettas had problems wearing out rather quickly using the standard military 9mm ammo which I guess is or was a rather "hot" loaded round. I know personal service pistols are a point of personal preference but I guess Beretta just left a bad taste in my holster. This story isn't helping.
    Beware the Fury of a patient man.

  6. #15
    By wearing out I mean that the M9 Berettas were having some minor and some major mechanical problems (unpredictable) that needed parts replacement long before parts replacement was anticipated. I was not an armorer so I don't know the exact parts that had to be replaced but there were mass shipments of the pistols back to Beretta and finally as I recall a lighter load was standardized for new 9mm ammo since the Army had already bought many Berettas and would have egg on the face if they went back to the 1911 .45. Damage included retention pin damage, chamber fracturing over time and some spring and slide problems. I don't recall any catastrophic failures like the gun blowing up in someone's hand or anything.

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by disneyr View Post
    By wearing out I mean that the M9 Berettas were having some minor and some major mechanical problems (unpredictable) that needed parts replacement long before parts replacement was anticipated. I was not an armorer so I don't know the exact parts that had to be replaced but there were mass shipments of the pistols back to Beretta and finally as I recall a lighter load was standardized for new 9mm ammo since the Army had already bought many Berettas and would have egg on the face if they went back to the 1911 .45. Damage included retention pin damage, chamber fracturing over time and some spring and slide problems. I don't recall any catastrophic failures like the gun blowing up in someone's hand or anything.
    Right and it took the US Armed Services.... what? 35 years to figure this out? Proof or BS.
    Billy

  8. #17
    These malfunctions were happening between 15 and 20 years ago so it didn't take that long for the Beretta problems to arise.

  9. #18
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    It's good to see Beretta was on top of this with good customer service. It reminds me of when I had added chrome goodies to my G19. The extended slide take down lever was not right and my slide would move forward on it's on sometimes. I replaced it with a stock black Glock part and never looked back at this point.

  10. #19
    What year was your tour? I found the following:

    The True Story of the Beretta M9 Pistol

    The M9 pistol program ran into trouble when in September of 1987 the slide of a civilian model Beretta 92SB pistol fractured at the junction where the locking block mates into the slide. The broken half of the slide flew back at the shooter (A member of the Navy Special Warfare Group) injuring him. (NSIAD-88-213) In January and February of 1988 respectively, 2 more military model M9 handguns exhibited the same problem, injuring 2 more shooters from the Navy Special Warfare Group.

    All three shooters suffered facial lacerations. One suffered a broken tooth and the other two required stitches. (NSIAD-88-213)

    The Army was doing unrelated barrel testing on current production civilian model 92SB pistols and military model M9 pistols and ran into the same slide separation issue. They fired 3 M9 pistols 10,000 times and inspected the weapons with the MPI process for evidence of slide cracks. They discovered that one of the weapons had a cracked slide. The Army then decided to fire all of the weapons until the slides failed. Failure occurred at round number 23,310 on one weapon, 30,083 on another, and 30,545 on the last weapon. (NSIAD-88-213)

    Examination of the NSWG slides and the Army slides showed a low metal toughness as the cause of the problems with slide separation. The Army then began to investigate the production process of the slides. (NSIAD-88-213) At the time the frames of the M9 pistols were produced in the US, while the slides were produced in Italy. There are reportedly documents from the Picatinny Arsenal that report a metallurgical study blaming the use of Tellurium in the manufacturing process for the low metal toughness of the Italian slides, but I have been unable to independently verify this information.

    After April of 1988, however, all slides for the M9/92 pistols were produced in the US. (NSIAD-88-213) As a part of the contract requirements, the Beretta Corporation had to build a plant inside the United States to produce the M9. It naturally took some time for the US plant (located in Accokeek MD.) to get into full production swing, so the Italian plant made the slides for a time.

    Several GAO reports and testimony from GAO staff before Congressional Sub-Committees (NSIAD-88-213, NSIAD-88-46, NSIAD-89-59 are a few…) report the total number of slide failures at 14. Three occurred in the field with the NSWG and the other 11 occurred in the test lab. Only 3 injuries resulted from the slide separation problem. The Beretta Corporation changed the design of the M9 pistol so that even if a slide fractured, the broken half could not come back and hit the shooter causing injury.

    Conclusions

    The Beretta M9/92 pistol has been in service with our military for almost 20 years now. After the production problems documented previously were addressed, the pistol proved to be mechanically sound and reliable, enduring hundreds of thousands of rounds with little trouble provided proper maintenance was supplied. A redesign in the locking block of the M9 pistol made changes to that important piece less frequent, causing the pistol to require even less time at the armorer’s bench.

    Quote Originally Posted by disneyr View Post
    By wearing out I mean that the M9 Berettas were having some minor and some major mechanical problems (unpredictable) that needed parts replacement long before parts replacement was anticipated. I was not an armorer so I don't know the exact parts that had to be replaced but there were mass shipments of the pistols back to Beretta and finally as I recall a lighter load was standardized for new 9mm ammo since the Army had already bought many Berettas and would have egg on the face if they went back to the 1911 .45. Damage included retention pin damage, chamber fracturing over time and some spring and slide problems. I don't recall any catastrophic failures like the gun blowing up in someone's hand or anything.
    Beware the Fury of a patient man.

  11. #20
    I was active duty from 89 until 05. The problems my unit encountered were mainly in Panama in the early 90's.
    A man's life, liberty, and property are only safe when the legislature is NOT in session. Will Rogers

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