Are .380's a Ripoff? - Page 3
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Thread: Are .380's a Ripoff?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
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    Alabama, Montgomery
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    I believe it all boils down to convenience in carrying. Both weight and bulk are the main reasons for the smaller semi-autos. As long as you match the right ammo to the reason for carrying a person should be on good ground, ie, if you carry for personal protection, carry ammo that will expand on contact for maximum stopping power.
    'til next time, Switch
    "Next to creating life, the finest thing a man can do is to save one." - Abraham Lincoln

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  3. #22
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    Jan 2010
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    Butner, North Carolina, United States
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    Quote Originally Posted by santa View Post
    I have wondered the same thing only the question is why are 410 shotgun shells twice as expensive as 12 gauge. Anybody have the answer to that? But in the case of $50 vs $20 I guess it pays to shop around. And it is true, 'you play you pay'.
    Because Taurus and S&W don't make 12 gauge revolvers!!!
    MSgt, USAF (ret), Life Member - NRA, Life Member - NAHC,
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  4. Quote Originally Posted by santa View Post
    I have wondered the same thing only the question is why are 410 shotgun shells twice as expensive as 12 gauge. Anybody have the answer to that? But in the case of $50 vs $20 I guess it pays to shop around. And it is true, 'you play you pay'.
    Go to a gun store, ANY gun store that sells shotguns. Ask to look at ALL the 12 gauge shotguns. Get a count of how many they have. Then ask to see ALL the .410's. I bet you'll find that 12 gauges out number the 410's by VERY large margin like 4 or 5 to 1 if not more. The ammo manufacturers know this, too. They load a massive amount of 12 gauge (in 3 common hull lengths) and know that even if they only make 1/2 a penny on each round, they would still need a dump truck to carry their profits to the bank.

    Small bores (under 20) are a niche market. The mid bores are far more versatile. Heck, you can hunt everything from squirrel and dove to bear with a 12 gauge. A 410 can take a squirrel any day but I would really rather have something far more substantial in my hands if faced with any bear indigenous to North America. The same thing happens when you get into the 12 gauge 3 1/2" or the 10 gauge. They are intended for a niche market. Nobody is gonna carry out 50 rounds of 3 1/2" 12 gauge shells and blow through them in a shooting session but a get out on a clays range (Skeet, Trap or Sporting Clays) and a couple boxes of 2 3/4" #8's won't last you long.

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Central N.Car.
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    Stock up on your needs and future needs while the supply is available. I tell my children that you do not wait till you are hungry to eat but eat to keep from getting hungry.

  6. I have had 4 back surgeries. I carry a XD S/C 9mm. Bullet placement trumps everything but with the energy a 9 puts out next to a .380 I'll take alittle pain.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Manchester State Forest, SC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Manta6 View Post
    Blame the Judge for 410 prices.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Hamberger View Post
    Because Taurus and S&W don't make 12 gauge revolvers!!!
    Based on your theories, can either of you explain why .410 has been substantially more expensive than 12 guage for years and years but the Judge has been around for only about 5? Perhaps the ammo manufacturers were planning ahead just in case...
    "I believe we should achieve a national standard on gun control, and that standard should be none whatsoever."

  8. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by mistergus75 View Post
    Seriously, why do you think this is? Are more .380 owners casual carriers who just like something easy to carry "just in case", rather than "head to the range" types who enjoy shooting?
    Absolutly

  9. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by hp-hobo View Post
    Based on your theories, can either of you explain why .410 has been substantially more expensive than 12 guage for years and years but the Judge has been around for only about 5? Perhaps the ammo manufacturers were planning ahead just in case...
    Taurus tryed getting something together in 28 gauge and the ATF nixed it, (said it was a short barrel shotgun)

  10. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Rocketgeezer View Post
    Taurus tryed getting something together in 28 gauge and the ATF nixed it, (said it was a short barrel shotgun)
    Actually the issue was with bore diameter. A handgun cannot have a bore diameter greater than 1/2 inch (Fifty Caliber).

  11. Quote Originally Posted by G50AE View Post
    Actually the issue was with bore diameter. A handgun cannot have a bore diameter greater than 1/2 inch (Fifty Caliber).
    Yup. The .50AE was originally intended to use the same bore diameter as the old Sharps buffalo gun rounds (.510). That makes sense, because folks could wipe the dust off all those old Lyman molds (or order new ones, Lyman NEVER throws away a set of mold specs) and just use the lighter weight cast bullet designs that have been around for over 100 years. Prior to the ATF (the was no 'E' back then) clearing it, they told them that .500 is the legal limit and the design was changed.

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