Are we responsible for the results of pulling the trigger no matter what?
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Thread: Are we responsible for the results of pulling the trigger no matter what?

  1. #1

    Are we responsible for the results of pulling the trigger no matter what?

    "Experts" say it all the time - once you pull the trigger you own the results.

    But as the saying goes, the only absolute is that there are no absolutes.

    LaVar Burton saw a man with a gun break through the living room screen late at night. The intruder fired several shots at him as Burton ran upstairs. Burton then retrieved his .45 caliber, semi-automatic pistol, and tried to return fire from the upstairs landing, but the gun jammed.

    Burton ran into a bedroom, and was able to dislodge the bullets. He said he stepped out of the room, heard footsteps coming towards him in the darkened house and fired one shot. "I closed my eyes and then I shot," Burton testified.

    The next thing he knew, his 7-year-old stepdaughter Amaia Edmond, "was lying on the floor." She was later pronounced dead.

    The two men suspected of being involved in the home invasion are charged with the death Amaia Edmond, as I think they should be.

    But what of Lavar Burton? Is it reasonable to close your eyes and shoot at footsteps?

    Fortunately for Lavar he was given immunity in exchange for his testimony against the two BG's.

    But that begs the question. Are we responsible for the results of pulling the trigger? Thankfully, there are no absolutes. Otherwise Lavar Burton would be facing the same fate as the BG's.

    Now think about that next time you want to premise an argument on an "absolute." Absolutes have a way of coming around when you don't want them to.

    Store here: http://www.lansingstatejournal.com/a...yssey=nav|head

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  3. #2
    I should have read the newspaper article first. I initially thought this was about LaVar Burton the actor.

  4. #3
    in his most well known role, he was blind, but could see

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    .....
    ....Burton ran into a bedroom, and was able to dislodge the bullets. He said he stepped out of the room, heard footsteps coming towards him in the darkened house and fired one shot. "I closed my eyes and then I shot," Burton testified.

    The next thing he knew, his 7-year-old stepdaughter Amaia Edmond, "was lying on the floor."[/url]
    Yes, he owned the results, and got away with involuntary manslaughter.
    Charlie

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    in his most well known role, he was blind, but could see
    I am still a Trekkie!

    Phasers are cool!

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlieK View Post
    Yes, he owned the results, and got away with involuntary manslaughter.
    I guarantee you he will think about what he "got away" with every day fir the rest of his life.

    That said if you pult the trigger you are responsible
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
    http://www.gunrightsmedia.com/ Internet forum dedicated to second amendment

  8. #7
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    He fails in my book. He didn't follow gun safety rules. How the hell are you going to know what your target is if you close your eyes then pull the trigger? Let alone what could be behind your target. I hope you are right that this crosses his mind every day for the rest of his life. I hope he learns to keep his eyes open when firing a firearm.

  9. There is a substantial difference between being criminally responsible and being morally responsible. In this case those who committed the home invasion are guilty of what is termed "felony murder", that is any death that occurrs during the commission of a felony that would not have occurred otherwise, which was not the result of direct criminal actions. This means that if two guys break into a bank and an old guard has a heart attack from the stress and dies, it is murder just as if they had shot him.

    This case stretches that definition a bit as a third parties direct (albeit negligent) actions resulted in the death of a 7 year old girl. That clearly fits the definition of manslaughter. In this case the prosecutor chose to go after the home invaders for felony murder in addition to likely charges related to the burglary. This would result in a bigger conviction, always a good thing for a prosecutor from a political standpoint.

    To secure that conviction he knows that he needs the testimony of this unfortunate father. However, if the father takes the stand he will convict himself of manslaughter. Under the fifth amendment that testimony cannot be compelled by the prosecutor. Therefore the prosecutor removes the threat of conviction and incrimination. The DA loses a manslaughter conviction but likely gains a conviction for felony murder, home invasion etc. clearly a winning strategy for the District Attorney.

    Now we come to the moral responsibility, do the invaders bear some moral responsibility in the death of the 7 year old girl? Of course they do, that is why the felony murder statute exists. But what of the father? His moral responsibility is ABSOLUTE! There is no way that the father in this case can shirk, avoid or dismiss his moral culpability in the death of his daughter. He blindly pulled the trigger on an unknown target which turned out to be his daughter. This will likely torture him for the rest of his life. Ask HIM if we are responsible for where every bullet goes. I doubt you will receive an "I beat the rap" story. You WILL hear a story of deep regret and profound remorse.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    in his most well known role, he was blind, but could see
    Not the same person. But I thought the same at first. Levar Burton is closer to my age, not 33.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by nogods View Post
    in his most well known role, he was blind, but could see
    I'd say far more people remember Lavar Burton as Kunta Kinte than Geordy La Forge
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
    http://www.gunrightsmedia.com/ Internet forum dedicated to second amendment

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