How do you refinish checkered 1911 grips?
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: How do you refinish checkered 1911 grips?

  1. #1

    How do you refinish checkered 1911 grips?

    How do you sand down the grips and remove the stain on them now, without sanding down the checkering as well? I want to refinish the grips and save money, but I cant see a way of doing it without removing the checkering during the sanding? I'm sure I could google it(I still will) but I wanted to see what my fellow members would do/have done.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  2.   
  3. #2
    what is the grip made of wood/composite/plastic?
    maybe an eco-friendly stripper, most of them aren't very harsh
    just check the direction and warnings BEFORE you buy it
    FREEDOM ISN'T FREE

  4. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by redneckfuller1977 View Post
    what is the grip made of wood/composite/plastic?
    maybe an eco-friendly stripper, most of them aren't very harsh
    just check the direction and warnings BEFORE you buy it
    It's wood. It looks to be a light brown stain. I'll post a photo of it tomorrow when it comes home from the gun store with me. I have read that the polyurethane can cause your hands to be rubbed raw? After I stain it should I use a more hand friendly oil such as Linseed oil?

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  5. #4
    i would use an oil... you just wont get that high gloss look
    FREEDOM ISN'T FREE

  6. #5
    Do not sand your grips. there are plenty of products on the market that will strip the finish, and products that will bleach(for lack of a better word). Check out some woodworking sites,, rockler.com and others. 1911 grips are so thin you could ruing them really quick. Just my two cents. There are also some good clear coats that are very good, but at bee's wax or some type of oil, I wouldn't use linseed it never really dries and is not very good on your skin.
    America will never be destroyed from the outside. If we falter and lose our freedoms, it will be because we destroyed ourselves.
    Abraham Lincoln

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by DavidH1 View Post
    Do not sand your grips. there are plenty of products on the market that will strip the finish, and products that will bleach(for lack of a better word). Check out some woodworking sites,, rockler.com and others. 1911 grips are so thin you could ruing them really quick. Just my two cents. There are also some good clear coats that are very good, but at bee's wax or some type of oil, I wouldn't use linseed it never really dries and is not very good on your skin.
    Thanks for the heads up, I'll hit up the Orange box(HD) and see what kind of stripper they have. I already have the stain just need some polyurethane. After it's dried, hit the grips with some fine steel wool to smooth them out?

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  8. I have used stain and polyurethane on countless projects and have never had either adversely affect my skin, other than a little stickiness, so don't worry about that. You can always use latex gloves as well if you are worried about it. Stripper is another matter altogether, it will burn your skin on contact so definitely wear gloves and make sure you have eye protection as well, it's pretty nasty stuff.
    To refinish your grips I would get a wood stripper. They make different kinds, some will pull up the poly and the stain just by sitting on them, then you either scrape it off or wipe it off with some mineral spirits. That might pull most of your stain out. Then you can reapply or scrape the stain off the checkering with something like a very small chisel, screwdriver, or putty knife. You will have to be very careful to go with the checkering and not take any wood material off. If you can find something small enough with a 90 degree bevel on it (if that's the angle of your checkering) you might be able to fold some very fine grit sand paper around the angle and sand with that.
    Also, I'm not sure I would put polyurethane on it, I think it would fill up your checkering and you wouldn't get the texture afterwards for your grip. I would put whatever stain you want on it and then finish it will oil, like linseed oil or something like it. You might need to reapply it occasionally, but it will finish nicely. It will be tedious, but if you do it right, it will look good. Good Luck!

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Hunter125 View Post
    I have used stain and polyurethane on countless projects and have never had either adversely affect my skin, other than a little stickiness, so don't worry about that. You can always use latex gloves as well if you are worried about it. Stripper is another matter altogether, it will burn your skin on contact so definitely wear gloves and make sure you have eye protection as well, it's pretty nasty stuff.
    To refinish your grips I would get a wood stripper. They make different kinds, some will pull up the poly and the stain just by sitting on them, then you either scrape it off or wipe it off with some mineral spirits. That might pull most of your stain out. Then you can reapply or scrape the stain off the checkering with something like a very small chisel, screwdriver, or putty knife. You will have to be very careful to go with the checkering and not take any wood material off. If you can find something small enough with a 90 degree bevel on it (if that's the angle of your checkering) you might be able to fold some very fine grit sand paper around the angle and sand with that.
    Also, I'm not sure I would put polyurethane on it, I think it would fill up your checkering and you wouldn't get the texture afterwards for your grip. I would put whatever stain you want on it and then finish it will oil, like linseed oil or something like it. You might need to reapply it occasionally, but it will finish nicely. It will be tedious, but if you do it right, it will look good. Good Luck!
    I was more so talking about your skin rubbing on it all day at the range. I know if you put polyurethane on an Ax handle and swing it without gloves it tends to rub you raw after a while of using it. I have some wire brushes around the house some place( I think they may even be brass). I'll apply the stripper and let it soak, then hit it with the wire brush and then wipe it down. I have the stain and a whole can of MINWAX finishing paste wax from a bureau I just refinished. I don't think I'll use the wax on the grips, but maybe some tung oil finish, or some teak oil.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

  10. #9
    I use linseed oil on both my M1 and M1A. It protects the stocks without a high gloss finish that would be out of place on a military stock. I reapply it once a year or sooner if they have been exposed to harsh weather. Can't go wrong with good old fashioned oil IMO.
    Last edited by NRA Lifer and Proud; 05-02-2011 at 10:59 AM. Reason: Grammar change
    NRA Life Member, NH CC, Gun Owners of America, Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, Second Amendment Foundation
    "Remember, incoming fire has the Right of Way"

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by NRA Lifer and Proud View Post
    I use linseed oil on both my M1 and M1A. It protects the stocks without a high gloss finish that would be out of place on a military stock. I reapply it once a year or sooner if they have been exposed to harsh weather. Can go wrong with good old fashioned oil IMO.
    How long does it take to dry? I also don't want an oil that feels like crap. I can't wait LOL, counting down the hours! I pick it up at 1:20 today, I have to decide if it's going to be a Him or a her so I can name it LOL. May even sneak in a Ruger LCP for the wife(Shhh, don't tell her, LOL)

    I picked up 600 rounds of ammo for it yesterday so I can bust it's cherry.

    THEY MAY TAKE OUR LIVES BUT THEY'LL NEVER TAKE OUR FREEDOM!!!!!

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast