Firearms training for beginners
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Thread: Firearms training for beginners

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
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    Firearms training for beginners

    A lady from my office and her family want to learn to shoot guns. Her husband has been a anti for years and is finally coming around that they are the devil and actually wants to own one for personal protection.

    since this family has never been around guns I am taking the opportunity to get them pointed in the right direction. I have taught some of my younger friends about gun safety and how the firearms work, the basics, in the past. What I would like to do with this group because 2 are adults and the one is a very mature teen is get them to do a little reading before we start the hands on stuff. Are there any good sites (or even this one) that I can find first timer lessons on shooting? I have googled this subject but what I find is shooting schools that want big money to tell you anything or even go to their school out of state.

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  3. Your best bet is to find an NRA certified instructor. Have the family enroll in the course and contact the instructor to see if you can "audit" the course (attend with them for free but not receive any credit) with them or simply pay to take the course yourself. I am not saying that you could not do a good job teaching them. However, NRA instructors work from a carefully developed and refined curriculum. This is designed to teach the novice what needs to be learned. I would worry about missing key pieces of information, or worse introducing bad habits that will be with them forever.

    NRA courses provide reading material, knowledgeable and certified instructors, and solid and safe instruction on the range. Trying to teach them yourself could put a strain on your relationship with them. Worse still your unintentional exuberance may turn them off at a very delacate time.

    Most local gun shops. ranges or gun clubs have either instructors on hand or can refer you to a local NRA instructor. The NRA basic pistol course or its equivilant for long guns is usually very reasonable and contains exactly the sort of information your freinds need.

  4. #3
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    Thanks, but this is not what I was looking for. This is more of an insult to my intelligence.

  5. #4
    I'm confused how someone saying that finding a certified instructor is a good plan is also insulting to you... If their competence and outlook on firearms is important to you it might be worth taking a step back from the situation and evaluating the suggestion. If you are determined to teach them yourself consider going to some instructor training as it could teach you more, not only about firearms but about how to teach.

  6. I didn't find the suggestions insulting at all and will actually be using this advice for some friends of my wife that are in need of training. I can gun sling but I know im not the best teacher/and or too close to the people involved.

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by walther380 View Post
    Thanks, but this is not what I was looking for. This is more of an insult to my intelligence.
    If you want to be an instructor get Certified.

    "It's easier to avoid conflict than it is to survive it" - SGB

  8. When my wife, 13 an 11 year olds were ready to learn about firearms and shooting. I hired an NRA instructor former Leo for 4 hours of private classroom and range instruction. I add to what he initially provided when I take one of my family members to the range for 1 on 1 time.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by walther380 View Post
    Thanks, but this is not what I was looking for. This is more of an insult to my intelligence.
    I am sorry, but no insult was intended.

    Teaching someone about any subject is a difficult task. The more information a potential instructor has on a subject, the more difficult the task of instructing becomes. It can be difficult for someone who has mastered a subject to break down his chosen field into basic building blocks of knowledge suitible for the uninitiated.

    Then there is the matter of your relationship to the students. A friendship or god forbid romantic attachment, introduces an authority problem into the student/teacher relationship. There must always be both a positional and knowledge based authority behind a teacher this is a type of command authority which requires obedience. This can be difficult to establish if there is already a relationship based on friendship which contains only relational authority, which operates by mutual conscent. The introduction of more invasive and demanding authority into a pre existing relationship causes significant stress.

    My advice to you was aimed at relieving you of the problems involved with taking on students in general and taking on people you know well as students in particular. I am sorry if I gave offense but I stand by my original advice.

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by walther380 View Post
    Thanks, but this is not what I was looking for. This is more of an insult to my intelligence.
    It's not most of the comments are saying you're not qualified, but saying you're not certified. I would suggest following everyone's advise on this. Especially seeing these individuals are from your work. Conflict and or animosity could be generated if you are taken wrongly in some example or instruction. With that said, I do fell competent in instructing, used to do it in the Navy. But I'm not a Firearms Certified Instructor and would gladly pass this on to someone who is. This would also help showing these individuals how serious handling of a firearm is. Just my 2 cents..........
    "The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities." --author and philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982)

  11. #10
    JSDinTexas Guest
    Well, I agree that the suggestions are not insulting and first thing I thought was to use a professional instructor. I like the idea of an NRA instructor, but I will also suggest a local concealed handgun instructor. Many of these teach handgun proficiency when they are not teaching a concealed class.
    I say this because I believe there is no substitute for a pro's perspective to learn the basics and maybe even more advanced skills. The pro's have honed their skills not only to use a gun, but to teach how to use a gun, where an individual may be unknowingly introducing bad habits they have. If we're talking target shooting no big deal - but personal defense?
    I have been around and used long and short guns for 50+ years and I will be attending a shotgun class next month. So I do practice what I preach, and hopefully I'm not insulting anyone with this.

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