Giving a pistol as a gift
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Thread: Giving a pistol as a gift

  1. Giving a pistol as a gift

    I'm planning on giving my son in law a pistol as a gift this summer and I'm trying to decide which gun to give.

    He's an inexperienced shooter and this would be his first gun. I'm torn between giving him a Ruger MKII or a Bersa Thunder .380.

    The Ruger would be a great trainer, accurate and cheap to shoot. (I know that he probably would probably not want to spend much money on ammo.)

    The Bersa has defensive capability, but once again, if he doesn't spend money on ammo, at around 30 cents a round, he may never get to be a decent shooter.

    I am also insisting on my daughter and him taking a good pistol safety course, in addition to taking them to a range myself, when I visit this summer.

    Any thoughts on this?

  2.   
  3. #2
    If he justs wants to shoot at paper for the time being to gain experience, I would suggest getting him a nice 22 cal. semi-auto. Lots of good choices out there. At 3 cents a shot it is by far the cheapest.
    If it would be a carry gun, then 9mm is cheap ammo, & decent to learn with.
    Good luck to you all.

  4. I agree with (missoak) a 22 pistol would good to learn with, ruger has some nice ones.Kel-tec makes a grat 9mm pistol, not to much money and easy to carry. good luck on your choice.

  5. #4

    Exclamation The last straw?

    Just be careful - if you buy a firearm, and then give it to someone else, that is technically a "straw purchase" and is in violation of federal law.

    Obviously the law was meant to stop people from purchasing firearms and giving them to criminals or other ineligible persons. But it's theoretically possible to get screwed by it.

    My advice: Take the guy gun-shopping. Let him pick out a firearm and pay for it (putting all the paperwork in his name) - then give him a cash equivalent. This keeps you out of legal trouble.
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
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  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by phillip gain View Post
    just be careful - if you buy a firearm, and then give it to someone else, that is technically a "straw purchase" and is in violation of federal law.

    Obviously the law was meant to stop people from purchasing firearms and giving them to criminals or other ineligible persons. But it's theoretically possible to get screwed by it.

    My advice: Take the guy gun-shopping. Let him pick out a firearm and pay for it (putting all the paperwork in his name) - then give him a cash equivalent. This keeps you out of legal trouble.
    absolutely positively incorrect and false information. <I tried all CAPS letters but the forum won't allow it. Phillip - go to a gun shop and read the instructions on the form 4473 and come back and tell us what you learn.

    Actually, Phillip, let's just put it up here so others can see too:



    Now... for the gift to remain legal, without being transferred through an FFL, both the father and son must be residents of the same state. But that has nothing to do with "straw purchasing".
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  7. Navy is correct. This clause in the Form 4473 is why I keep trying to illustrate to LAC's that if they ever get accused of a straw purchase they need to sue for BIG $$. The Form 4473 clearly indicates that a so-called "straw purchase" is an impossibility in Q11's information, as long as you answer Yes to being the actual transferee. That said, if your State requires that you go through the FFL holder for your son in law to take ownership, do so within the law.

    On to the OP.

    The 22 is a great option. Since you're caught in the dilemma, how about this. Explore 22 kits for pistols. See if what they fit is an applicable pistol for your gift. If so, get the kit and the pistol that mates to it so your son in law has the best of both worlds. Still, the Ruger 22 is a nice option.

    Example: Glock 9mm w/ Advantage Arms kit. 1911 w/ Advantage Arms kit. Or a Tanfoglio 9mm w/ the Kadet kit.

    Here's a Tanfo package on gunbroker that would be just right. EAA Tanfoglio Witness Pistol 9mm / .22 LR - NIB : Semi-auto at GunBroker.com

  8. #7
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    Desert Eagle .50AE

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horkos View Post
    Desert Eagle .50AE
    Ya, Always bigger in Texas. BUT would also go along with the .22. Get a S&W (Product: Model 48)
    or similar revolver. It's safer then Auto's and if he likes it after while he (they) can upgrade to something a little more powerful. I say S&W because you'll get a better trade in. Just my 2.
    "The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities." --author and philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982)

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
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  11. #10
    I believe that a .22 pistol is the way to go for a novice shooter. He can shoot 1000 rounds for cheap. It's low recoil and report is great for teaching basics of shooting. The Ruger .22's are solid and reliable.
    War to the Knife, Knife to the hilt.
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