Polishing Feed Ramps - Page 2
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Thread: Polishing Feed Ramps

  1. Quote Originally Posted by G50AE View Post
    I won't polish any of my feedramps, the sheepdogs might slip on their way to the water trough if I did.
    Sense of humor (?) noted. Got anything to add to the feedramp polishing suggestions?

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  3. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    147
    When I was a working gunsmith back in the late Pleistocene a Llama came in for some work; trigger job, feed ramp, etc. The owner had tried the feed ramp job himself and the inside of the gun looked like a half-gone all day sucker. It wasn't even good for parts. It's an easy thing to honk up if you don't know what you're doing.
    Better to perish in the struggle for freedom than live to see defeat. There ARE things to be feared more than death. The fyrd is a Constitutional imperative.

  4. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by revjen45 View Post
    It's an easy thing to honk up if you don't know what you're doing.
    I guess that gunsmith was a real honkey.

  5. #14
    A few years ago I bought a Kimber Pro Carry II in 45ACP. I was the third owner. It would shoot FMJ rounds just fine, but about half of JHP rounds jammed, with the nose stuck into the feed ramp. I sent it to Kimber twice, but their gunsmith couldn't fix it. He cleaned and lubricated it, but said that the feed ramp had been worked on by someone who didn't know what he was doing and had taken too much off the feed ramp.

    The Pro Carry II has an aluminum frame, and the feed ramp is part of the frame. The Kimber gunsmith said he could replace the frame for $350, but I declined. He said he would decline, too. So he returned it to me.

    I took some powdered graphite and rubbed it on the feed ramp and took it to the shooting range. I fired 24 rounds of FMJ and then fired 24 rounds of JHP. They were a mixture of Federal and Winchester. I fully expected the first 24 rounds of FMJ to wipe the graphite off the feed ramp and cause the JHP rounds to jam as before. But I couldn't get the JHP rounds to jam at all.

    I took it to a gun show, along with the two reports from Kimber showing what they said. I also told a dealer who expressed interest in buying it what I had done with the graphite. He bought it from me for $100 less that I had paid for it and was happy to do that.

    So those of you who are having trouble with rounds hanging up on the feed ramp might try the graphite treatment.
    Charlie

  6. #15
    I'm not talking grinding, I'm using the polishing pads with a compound so I'm not taking any off at all

  7. #16
    I have done it on my 2 Hi Point carbines, they don't come with feed ramps that are smoothed out very well. It was reasonably easy to do (used a dremel)and has definitely helped.

  8. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by revjen45 View Post
    When I was a working gunsmith back in the late Pleistocene a Llama came in for some work; trigger job, feed ramp, etc. The owner had tried the feed ramp job himself and the inside of the gun looked like a half-gone all day sucker. It wasn't even good for parts. It's an easy thing to honk up if you don't know what you're doing.
    Those must have been some dangerous times, when even livestock like llamas were armed. My theory is that when someone told him about the feed ramp, he completely misunderstood, and it got worn out from all the grain that he ate off it.
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/members/phillip-gain-albums-phil-s-photos-picture3828-reciprocity-map-29jun11.JPG

  9. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    7,733
    I polish my Glock feed ramps and trigger assemblies with a small amount of Flitz and a felt tipped dremmel at VERY LOW SPEED (careful not to remove the protective coating). I've never ha a Glock FTF or jam in over ten years of ownership.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  10. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Wesley Chapel NC
    Posts
    270
    I polish all my feed ramps and slide to frame engagements for that matter. Removing the machining marks shortens or eliminates the "break in period". Don't use anything more coarse than 400 grit and work your way up to a 1000-2000 grit for a mirror finish.

    Magazine problems are more likely to cause nosedives and jams than your feed ramp angle.

  11. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Gain View Post
    Those must have been some dangerous times, when even livestock like llamas were armed.


    Daisey was always prepared for such situations.

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