Acccidental Discharge
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Thread: Acccidental Discharge

  1. #1

    Acccidental Discharge

    I am faily new to guns. I have been shooting for about a year now. I have a Ruger SR9C and I go to the range at least twice a week. The last time I was at the range my gun accidentally discharged. Thank God my gun was pointing down range when it happened. I had just loaded my gun and had pick it up then BOOM, it fired before I was ready. I must had put my hand on the trigger without realizing it. Has this ever happened to anyone else?? This was the first time it happened to me and it scared the hell out of me. At the time I was the only one on the range. Can I get some input on this please!!!

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina/Charleston
    Posts
    2,388
    Sure hope this was a wakeup call. You may not get a second chance. The rules of safety are really very simple---reread them again and again until you memorize them and they become as familiar to you as your firat name.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Glendale, Arizona
    Posts
    1,257
    Accidents can happen to anyone. Don't beat yourself up over it. No one was hurt, and that is the main thing. I'm sure you feel bad enough without everyone offering to make you feel worse with criticism or "scolding" you over it.

    The thing about gun safety is it is very easy to get lackadaisical about it. It's human nature. Especially when you shoot a lot and handle a lot of different weapons. While I'm never careless, I do have to remind myself from time to time. Complacency it what gets you. Accidents happen when you least expect. Much like driving a car. It's when you're happily motoring along, minding your own business that something bad happens.

    I avoid public ranges because of the lack of safety I've seen displayed by others. The last straw was at a large public range near me I used to frequent quite regularly. I was muzzle swept TWICE in less than 10 minutes. The most aggravating part is when I complained to the clerk behind the counter he gave me this "deer in the headlights" look and replied, "$h!t happens". I've never been back since. Being safe is something you cannot depend on others to do, which is why I now joined and shoot in a private club. Bill T.

  5. #4
    It happens to the best of us, thankfully no one was hurt

  6. #5

    Exclamation

    NRA's Three Rules of Firearm Safety

    1) Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.
    Kudos for getting this one right. Otherwise things could have been a LOT worse.

    2) Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot
    Oops! Looks like you blew it on this one. Fortunately no one was hurt. At this point, you should reflect on the incident and try to figure out what went wrong? My guess would be that this is a single action automatic (or perhaps DA/SA), and that you left it cocked after loading the magazine in, rather than either a) keeping the safety on while loading or b) decocking after loading depending on the type of action. This means the amount of trigger pull required would be minimal, maybe a pound or two.

    In any case - you should now re-read your owners manual on the operation of this firearm until you know it by heart. (If you don't have a manual, GET ONE from the manufacturer.) Also - you should get into the habit of making sure that finger is outside and above the trigger housing, pointed straight along the slide.


    3) Keep the firearm unloaded until ready to use it.
    I hope you're following this rule.
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/members/phillip-gain-albums-phil-s-photos-picture3828-reciprocity-map-29jun11.JPG

  7. #6
    Guns are machines, they sometimes fail. We are human, we make mistakes. This is why there is redundancy built into the simplest set of rules. It was pointed in a safe direction and that is the important part this time. I'm sure we are all guilty of a few slips and I'm sure we've all had a machine fail us before. I wouldn't get too worked up about it, it probably won't be the last mistake you make, or machine to fail. Just be thankful no one was hurt, and remember it if your ever start to get lax.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Gain View Post
    NRA's Three Rules of Firearm Safety

    1) Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction.
    Kudos for getting this one right. Otherwise things could have been a LOT worse.

    2) Keep your finger off the trigger until ready to shoot
    Oops! Looks like you blew it on this one. Fortunately no one was hurt. At this point, you should reflect on the incident and try to figure out what went wrong? My guess would be that this is a single action automatic (or perhaps DA/SA), and that you left it cocked after loading the magazine in, rather than either a) keeping the safety on while loading or b) decocking after loading depending on the type of action. This means the amount of trigger pull required would be minimal, maybe a pound or two.

    In any case - you should now re-read your owners manual on the operation of this firearm until you know it by heart. (If you don't have a manual, GET ONE from the manufacturer.) Also - you should get into the habit of making sure that finger is outside and above the trigger housing, pointed straight along the slide.


    3) Keep the firearm unloaded until ready to use it.
    I hope you're following this rule.
    PS - if this is the first time you are seeing these rules...then you need to go take a firearms safety course!!
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/members/phillip-gain-albums-phil-s-photos-picture3828-reciprocity-map-29jun11.JPG

  9. #8
    I had my first and only ND (negligent discharge) a year ago. Nobody and nothing was hurt, except my pride and a roof shingle over my bedroom.

    I had been installing some new rosewood grips on a Colt Officer 1911 that I had inherited from my dad. The original one with the Colt emblem crumbled, and my wife bought me the new grips for my birthday. After I installed them, I took my Glock out of my holster and laid it on the bed. I pulled back the slide of the Colt, looked through the port and saw that there was no round and no magazine, then holstered it and practived a dry-fire. Satisfied, I put the Colt in its box and locked it.

    I noticed my Glock laying on the bed. As if it was a habit, I picked it up, racked the slide, pointed at the ceiling and squeezed the trigger. (To this day I have no idea why I would ever do that.)

    The two loudest sounds a gun can make are: 1) Click when it should go Boom, and 2) Boom when it should go Click.

    Of course I was deaf. I was also stunned, as if, "What? How the heck could that have happened?" It took about 2 minutes before I realized my wife, in the living room, would be wondering 1) if I was alive, 2) what did it hit? and 3) if she came in to check on me, where was it now pointed? (Good on her - I wouldn't have thought that one.) I shouted "I'm okay!", put down all weapons, and went in to try to explain. Turns out she had been shouting my name, and "Are you okay?", which I did not hear.

    I locked up all my guns and didn't touch one for a month. My ND changed forever my attitude towards handling. The Four Laws which I had memorized, had become VERY REAL.

    1) Treat ALL guns as though they are ALWAYS loaded.
    2) Don't allow the muzzle to point at or sweep anything that you are not willing to destroy.
    3) Keep your finger off the trigger until have the target in your sights and are ready to destroy it.
    4) Know your target, and what is behind it (and in front of it, and beside it).

    Because I am such a poor shot, I have added a corollary to #4: When you miss, you will still hit SOMETHING. You are responsible for whatever that is that you hit.

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Laithe View Post
    Guns are machines, they sometimes fail. We are human, we make mistakes. This is why there is redundancy built into the simplest set of rules. It was pointed in a safe direction and that is the important part this time. I'm sure we are all guilty of a few slips and I'm sure we've all had a machine fail us before. I wouldn't get too worked up about it, it probably won't be the last mistake you make, or machine to fail. Just be thankful no one was hurt, and remember it if your ever start to get lax.
    Well-said. If you're not sure whether or not you had a finger on the trigger, you should take the firearm to a qualified gunsmith and have it checked out. As Laithe said, machines can and do fail, and it's important to know your firearm is safe.
    S&W M&P 45; Ruger GP100 .357 Magnum; Charter Arms .38 Undercover
    http://www.usacarry.com/forums/members/phillip-gain-albums-phil-s-photos-picture3828-reciprocity-map-29jun11.JPG

  11. You might consider a gun with a grip safety. It has a little lever at the back of the grip so that the gun can't discharge unless you are holding it properly.
    That said, your primary safety is in your brain, and your secondary safety is your hand. A grip safety, like any other mechanical device, can fail - but only you are in charge of how you handle your weapon.
    Analyze the situation fairly. Clearly you didn't keep your booger hook off the bang lever, which is a very important level of safety. However you DID have your muzzle pointed at something you were prepared to destroy. The four basic rules of gun safety exist because even if you fail at three of them, keeping any one of them can prevent a disaster, which is exactly what happened.
    1. Treat all guns as if they are loaded
    2. Never point your gun at anything you are not prepared to destroy
    3. Keep your finger off the trigger until you are ready to shoot.
    4. Be sure of your target, and what is behind it.

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