At what age do you teach kids about guns? How to shoot? - Page 4
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Thread: At what age do you teach kids about guns? How to shoot?

  1. #31
    I'm glad to see kids exposed young. I felt like I missed out by not being exposed until my twenties.

  2.   
  3. All three of my kids started shooting at the age five.My grand daughter may start even earlier.

  4. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Butner, North Carolina, United States
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    My Father introduced me to shooting an old Gambles 28ga. double barrel and Remington .22 short, long, & long rifle whem I was five years old. He took me hunting when I was 6yrs old. I remember I nearly got my bag limit of seven Chinese Ringnecks that day. But try taking a kid that young hunting today, Sarah Brady and her band of anti-gun freaks would all over you in a hearbeat. But my 1st hunt was 64 years ago. By the way, we were still in Colorado at the time.
    MSgt, USAF (ret), Life Member - NRA, Life Member - NAHC,
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  5. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Edsworld View Post
    My nephew spent this weekend with us and I decided to teach him about hand guns. He has always seen me with mine and was always asking about it, so I got some snapcaps and started showing him how to operate the weapon. Everything from loading the mag to chambering a round. I even let him dry fire it with the snapcaps. He has been shooting .22 rifles with his grampa for about a year now.


    A buddy of mine thinks he is to young and I shouldn't be teaching him how to operate a hand gun. He says teach him about the gun but not how operate it. He does not think an 11yr. old should know how to operate a semi-auto hand gun.
    As soon as they are old enough to hurt themselves with one.

    Seriously, a child can find a gun not only in his own house, but at a friend's, on the street or even at school. If you take away the "Forbidden Fruit" syndrome, that need of every human to desire that which they cannot have, then firearms become just everyday tools and not something of Hollywood and "movie magic" that they envy and have never seen close up or touched before. If you take away the mystery and magic, there is nothing to draw them to it and if they know how to use it there is much less chance they will hurt themselves or others.

    My daughter knew how to operate a .22 semi-auto pistol at 4. She liked to shoot on the range, but firearms held absolutely no mystery for her, so she never touched them at home or anywhere else.
    Edmund Burke: “The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.” – 1784 speech. Taken from Founding Fathers Notes. "The unarmed man is not just defenseless -- he is also contemptible." Machiavelli

  6. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Ed Hamberger View Post
    My Father introduced me to shooting an old Gambles 28ga. double barrel and Remington .22 short, long, & long rifle whem I was five years old. He took me hunting when I was 6yrs old. I remember I nearly got my bag limit of seven Chinese Ringnecks that day. But try taking a kid that young hunting today, Sarah Brady and her band of anti-gun freaks would all over you in a hearbeat. But my 1st hunt was 64 years ago. By the way, we were still in Colorado at the time.
    Luckily, Sarah and the bunch knows better than to get that close to hunting grounds and all those evil guns that go off by themselves...
    Edmund Burke: “The people never give up their liberties but under some delusion.” – 1784 speech. Taken from Founding Fathers Notes. "The unarmed man is not just defenseless -- he is also contemptible." Machiavelli

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina/Charleston
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    2,388
    Seems like most replies have positive tones and I disagree to a point. Learning to shoot must be done with an adult present right next to him all the time--there is no way that I can see accepting the fact that "my child" rises above the intelligence and responsibilty level of someone else's irresponsible, unknowing child who may listen to what you are saying but is hearing nothing you say. Semi autos? What kind? Age of child? Does not make sense again unless the adult is standing right there and even then I remember a scenario not to long ago and it involved an UZI-type firearm--dad was there, rangemasters were there, sanctioned, licensed shooting area---guess what? the kid (do not remember age--think around 10) lost control and ended up shooting himself dead--so much for a child and adults being around and a semi auto. I also find incredulous when some people reply with "my child knows and I taught him and I used to as a kid"--if the guns are not secure so that there is no way in hell they can access them, you are playing with fire and I surely hope and pray you never get burnt---it is always somebody else's child who is killed with a parent's gun--it is never yours---UNTIL IT HAPPENS. In direct answer to question---age? It will be what you consider right. If close supervision is there ALL THE TIME, I would think that around 10 and up or at least where physicality and mentality meet a parent's learned impression of their child without selling out to the belief that my child is just that perfect almost adult.

  8. #37
    I took my son to the range for the first time about 6 months ago at 9 1/2 yrs old. He primarily uses a Baretta .22 but like to fire 1 or 2 rounds from my 9mm and .380. He currently has about 300 rounds fired, under his belt.

  9. they need to be mature enough to understand the danger and follow the rules. that depends on the kid, not the age.

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