**Flash Mob** - Page 4
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Thread: **Flash Mob**

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    699
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    Yeah. I'll have to eat that one. Size 13 too!

    It was a joke from Chris Rock about growing up in the hood.
    That would have been a different context, more to do with the area one was raised than who raised you. Middle class suburbs for me. Consider it a lesson in generalizations, or the mistake of making them, if you will.

    Have a good one.
    One must be wary of the mentality creating the problem or the law creating the crime.

    I love America and the Constitution, if you don't then get out!

  2.   
  3. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    I like the idea where you can hit the button and the doors lock. Bullet-proof glass and a bandit barrier protects the clerk while containing the animals.

    Bullet Proof Fabricated Systems | Bandit Barrier | Pacific BulletProof Co.
    A Conoco I used to work at years back had that set up. I worked in a bullet proof glass cage and had a button on the back wall to lock the doors. Problem... The rest of the glass in the store was normal glass.

  4. #33
    don't the police notice a gang of 20 to 30 kids and suspect trouble! Where I grew up a group that large would have been given a "police escort" to help them stay on the right side of the law. What a bunch of good for nothing scumbags, this time some candy and pop, down the road the register cash, or a car, or a home invasion. Most of them are recognisable. But that will lead to NOTHING as usual, homey's got your back brother. They could be the ones who didn't get their food stamps on time!

  5. #34
    That's what insurance is for not worth taking a life property can be replaced!!!!!!!!!!

  6. #35
    When one refers to the other as, "Baby Momma" or "Baby Daddy" and Obamacare didn't show up this month this is what you get.

  7. If this kind of behavior goes unpunished and the fact that it is all over the television will send a message to all of the low life, welfare sucking people out there that this is a win win for them if they need to go get their malt liquor and chips.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by inspector455 View Post
    If this kind of behavior goes unpunished and the fact that it is all over the television will send a message to all of the low life, welfare sucking people out there that this is a win win for them if they need to go get their malt liquor and chips.
    I agree the news gets around quickly, other dead heads follow it up.

  9. This is a shame that our society is this bad. No wonder there are more and more people carring guns these days. The unfortunate thing is that these kids under better circumstances would be good kids. This was started by a few very uneducated souls and the rest just went a long with it. A true mob mentality This is what are government has been teaching us for the last 60 years a complete lack of education and just reward someone for non production. This happens every where accross our planet not just at our corner store but in the board rooms, police departments and goverments. They are just doing what they see are government doing everyday. take from the hard workers and give to the lazy.. what do you think is going to happen when the government runs out of credit... and no more money for nothing..

  10. #39
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Carolina USA
    Posts
    1,450
    About 30 yrs ago, I worked the 3rd shift at the most robbed "C" store in Memphis. One night we had the football team from an all black college in MS come in after a game with Memphis State. They all (even the coaches), swarmed the store stealing everything they could grab. A couple of them held the door open so it could not be remotely locked; while others cleared out the beer cooler, candy & chip isles.


    I really couldn't do anything but activate the silent alarm and watch while I was locked up in my cubicle behind the counter. Of course, MPD arrived to late and told me they couldn't follow them into MS. Basically, we filed a report and placed a claim with our insurance company.

    But, lucky for "THEM" noboby chose to try & rob the register. I had a 30/30 cocked & ready to put a hole through the counter if any of them had pulled a weapon & tried to rob the register.

    -

  11. #40
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    State of Confusion
    Posts
    7,733
    Quote Originally Posted by Unfettered Might View Post
    That would have been a different context, more to do with the area one was raised than who raised you. Middle class suburbs for me. Consider it a lesson in generalizations, or the mistake of making them, if you will.

    Have a good one.
    Absolutely correct about the middle-class suburban effect.

    Statistically speaking, you're the exception to the trend. Studies find that kids raised by grandparents are more likely to have social, emotional, educational and criminal issues. This was found to be due to the older generation having a harder time overcoming the obstacles of raising a child. It's harder for them.

    More than 4.5 million minors are living with a grandparent according to the latest statistics from the U.S. Census Bureau. Out of this total, about 2.4 million children are being raised primarily by grandparents and the numbers keep rising. In Illinois, more than 200,000 children live with a grandparent as their primary caregiver, according to the Illinois Department of Aging.

    The challenges are evident in studies such as one conducted by Northern Illinois University in DeKalb and published in the journal, Applied Developmental Science. The study reported a gap in reading achievement for children from the ages of two to about 5.5 years old when a custodial grandmother in a low-income neighborhood was raising them. Such neighborhoods in cities that include Chicago, Boston and San Antonio, had large minority populations. The outcome was better in suburban or well-off families. The study based its findings on analysis of community statistics.

    When parents falter, children naturally fall into the laps of their grandparents. Caring for a grandchild may be temporary, for example when a parent is ill or in turmoil. It can also be permanent, as in the case of death, serious substance abuse, or incarceration. Following are some of the common circumstances that place children in jeopardy, forcing them to seek the sanctuary of their grandparents (Abandonment of the child by the parent. Parental illness (mental and physical). Teenage pregnancy. Substance abuse. Unemployment. Homelessness. Incarceration. Death of a parent. Divorce. Family violence. Child abuse and neglect. Poverty).

    This is a subject we know much about... from the grandparent perspective. We have raised a grand-nephew after his mother and father fell to drug addiction. His experiences as a small child gave way to increased emotional and behavioral issues. He misses his parents and has difficulty coming to terms with his situation. This has caused him to "act out" in school and social settings. He gets help from a child psychologist and has made good progress but he has much to overcome. We hope our caring and exposure to a nurturing environment can eventually get him through his troubles, but he is still only nine-years-old. He has experienced turmoil during the development period where his "gut-value-programming" (the base of morality, right and wrong, ethics, etc.) was most important.

    I'm glad to hear your grandparents did so well. It was probably very hard on them but their love for you kept them. God bless them for their love and caring. Your post gives me hope for my nephew as he is very hard to handle. Thanks much for the encouragement.
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

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