Laser targeting... Da or Nyet? - Page 3
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Thread: Laser targeting... Da or Nyet?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnmed3 View Post
    Most people won't even bother with aligning the laser with their iron sights. They think just because they have a laser that their infallible.

    Also laser can very easily get out of alignment, bump the gun against a wall, drop it run out of battery etc. I just don't trust the darn things. Practice is key.
    I do not believe most people will not sight in their lasers. To believe that is to believe most gun owners are irresponsible and stupid. I haven't found that in the vast majority of gun owners I've met.

    I've not had my lasers get out of alignment. In fact even when I've removed them and replaced them they have been amazingly on target--I wouldn't expect that and I wouldn't rely on it but it's been the case so far.

    If you drop your gun, you can throw off your regular sights or break them in the case of those that are largely plastic. My recommendation is don't drop your gun. If you do, you need to check all sights that you have, laser or standard. Just because you put a laser on a gun, doesn't mean you remore the regular sights. One does not negate the other. A laser is largely worthless in bright sunlight, regular sights are largely worthless in low light conditions.

    I'm sorry you don't trust them. I would guess you have no experience with them. They are a tool. A tool that gives you a better chance of hitting your target in a lot of situations.
    Maybejim

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  3. #22
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    "Using iron sights was more stable than using the laser because of the dot jumping around."

    I hate to break it to you but it wasn't just the laser dot jumping around, it was the aim point of your gun jumping around. You just don't notice the movement with your iron sights. That's why it's such a good training aid. You can see exactly how stable or unstable your hold is.
    Maybejim

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  4. #23
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    Learn to use 'em both... Must learn to use traditional sights first for good control and in case laser fails to operate.

    A laser is a great training tool and visual aid when working with a new shooter.

    For the seasoned shooter who has been taught proper technique, using both together should be easy. I like the laser for multiple reasons. I have 2 handguns with Crimson Trace grips installed. Low light conditions, the laser is a good assist. Shooting from a position where having your head and body exposed to achieve a good sight picture with irons would likely lead to you taking hits, is easier with the laser. Shooting with your handgun pointed forward, but still alongside your chest with your support hand still on your midsection (position 2) not pointed in or extended away from the body, is easier with the laser.

    My 2 pennies..
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  5. I used to be very skeptical about lasers. That is, until I decided to switch to a J-frame for cc. Being my first snubby gun, I was unaware how difficult it was to shoot accurately. I upgraded it with a hiviz sight, which helped my tired old eyes. But I realized that if I was forced into a confrontation in low light condition or shooting beyond the iron sight effective range, I'd be in trouble. I decided to slap a laser as a back up. I found it was money well spent for all the reasons stated above. Most of practice is still with the laser turned off. Plus, all my other handguns to not have a laser. So, it is not like it has become a crutch or anything like that.

    With or w/o laser, you must train, practice, dry fire, etc a lot and in all possible configurations. Take no short cuts.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by maybejim View Post
    You can see exactly how stable or unstable your hold is.
    Especially while pulling the trigger. You'd be surprised.

  7. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by civilian75 View Post
    Especially while pulling the trigger. You'd be surprised.
    Put a few dummy rounds in a magazine randomly when practicing. Especially with new shooters... They anticipate the recoil. The laser does the dance on the target (and elsewhere) and sends a visual stimuli reinforcing the connection between movements both large and small and misses...
    You can give peace a chance alright..

    I'll seek cover in case it goes badly..

  8. #27
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    When I go "target shooting" I will use my 22, I will sight carefully without optic aids and have no problems with my friends using lasers or any kind of optics to "hit the bullseye"--that is what target shooting is all about. They also take their time aiming when using their other defensive firearms, which I find to be a big waste of ammo and time. I will also bring along another target with me on a separate shooting stall where I shoot my defense weapons, be them home defense or CC. The targets will be at max maybe 7-10 yards and the shots will be more instinctive point/shoot. I cannot, for the life of me, understand the purpose in taking 5 or 10 seconds with a 9mm or 45 to be sure I hit the bullseye---I could say the same for turning on a laser etal for accurate shooting. The reliance on the laser and the milisecond it takes to have it on and acquire the target without having that instinctive ability to point/shoot strikes me as a dangerous precedent if you are determined to defend yourself in a very fluid situation. Just sayin

  9. Quote Originally Posted by disneyr View Post
    I agree with training and practice, practice, practice with proper sight picture. Being able to shoot very well with no laser is a must. That being said, there are very good applications for having a laser. Practicing and having your laser site "dead on balls accurate" zeroed with your sights is a must. They are also very good for training dry fire trigger squeeze. There are low light advantages as well. I have the kind of laser that is on the rear sight so it doesn't come on passively. I practice instinct shooting and aimed (quick and slow) shooting without it and I am pretty proficient. I practice deliberate deployment and aiming using the laser in moderate to low light.

    I like both the iron sights and the laser.
    I agree, and it's another tool that can be used for training. It was a terrific aid for me in point and shoot practice but I definitely see Gunny's POV.

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by cmhbob View Post
    That is clearly a biased and very wrong claim. When he claims his two guns and lasers didn't shoot where they were aimed he lost all credibility. If they are sighted in, they shoot where they are aimed. He clearly didn't sight them in or deliberately set them to aim other than where the gun was aimed. So through either dishonesty or stupidity, he got the results he wanted. I have 3 guns with lasers and they shoot as well with the laser as they do with the iron sights (actually better since it is easier to see exactly where the gun is pointed).

    A laser is a tool. It works well in some circumstances and not well in other circumstances. It's like all tools including iron sights. Depending on the amount of light there is, you often can recognize a target but not see your iron sights. That's one time when the laser is valuable.
    Maybejim

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  11. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by kelcarry View Post
    When I go "target shooting" I will use my 22, I will sight carefully without optic aids and have no problems with my friends using lasers or any kind of optics to "hit the bullseye"--that is what target shooting is all about. They also take their time aiming when using their other defensive firearms, which I find to be a big waste of ammo and time. I will also bring along another target with me on a separate shooting stall where I shoot my defense weapons, be them home defense or CC. The targets will be at max maybe 7-10 yards and the shots will be more instinctive point/shoot. I cannot, for the life of me, understand the purpose in taking 5 or 10 seconds with a 9mm or 45 to be sure I hit the bullseye---I could say the same for turning on a laser etal for accurate shooting. The reliance on the laser and the milisecond it takes to have it on and acquire the target without having that instinctive ability to point/shoot strikes me as a dangerous precedent if you are determined to defend yourself in a very fluid situation. Just sayin
    When I squeeze the handle of my G26, G30, or my LCP, the laser comes on. There is no as in none, delay to turn on the laser. That's with a Crimson Trace. If you use something else there may be an extra step.
    Maybejim

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    What you say isn't as important as what the other person hears

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