Dual citizenship??? please answer - Page 3
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Thread: Dual citizenship??? please answer

  1. Quote Originally Posted by Tucker's Mom View Post
    I have dual citizenship. I am an Australian and an American. I live here permanently and visit my house in Australia at least once a year to check that my son who lives in my house over there don't turn it into a brothel or something.. <g> so far, so good. But I tell you what, once you start living here, no matter how much you say you love your country, you either stay here or go back home. It is easy for you because Canada is just across the border and in the same mainland. I will have a lot of difficulty doing that with my original country and here. Anyway, once you got the hang of living here, no matter how great you think your country of origin is, think about it -- you can only be loyal to one country. It was how I felt after living here for a very good while, whereas I fought tooth and nails to come and live here at first. Now I will fight tooth and nails to help protect the right and the freedom I continue to enjoy living here.

    I bought my first gun while I wasn't a citizen yet. I have bought many after I became a citizen (before the boat accident), tried many that fits my little hand -- but I can't bring it with me to Oz, not even a pepper spray. I feel so helpless when I go to Oz so I make my stay as short as possible.

    Come here, live here and be a citizen...a loyal citizen. You won't regret it.
    Welcome to America. Buying your 1st gun before completing citizenship is a good example that a legal resident alien here has more liberty than a citizen in some nations. Some nations don't even allow guns for their citizens, much less for aliens.

    I think it is a real shame that countries we've always thought of as civilized, advanced nations have clamped down on the liberties of their citizens, or rather, subjects. Australia, Britain, Canada, etc.

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  3. #22
    I was told a few years ago by Immigraton that they no longer recognise "dual citizenship." You are either an alien or a citizen. For example: My wife is Canadian, she is a legal alien with a permanent resident card. She has no desire to get U.S. Citizenship. My son was born in the U.S. but since my wife is Canadian, his citizenship is viewed differently by the U.S. and also by Canada. The U.S. sees him as an American citizen only. Canada views him as a dual citizen.

    The US immigration said that as long as one of his citizenships is US, they will only consider that one.

    ...the immigration laws in this country need an overhaul. By the end of my wife's immigration status change from legal alien to permanent resident, we were more familiar with forms and rules that half of the folks we had to deal with.

  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by ncpatriot View Post
    Welcome to America. <snipped for brevity...>

    I think it is a real shame that countries we've always thought of as civilized, advanced nations have clamped down on the liberties of their citizens, or rather, subjects. Australia, Britain, Canada, etc.
    Thank you for the welcome...Our youngest boy is now 23 years of age (how times passed so quickly when one is not looking...) and our eldest son is 37 years of age, so you can just imagine how long I have been here -- more than I can allow myself to remember. LOL...I had been coming here to the US even before I got married because of work, but never had the inclination to live here. To me it is a place to visit...Australia at the time was somewhat a free country and we were allowed gun ownership. We were allowed to hunt down kangaroos and wild pigs and all those pests at the time and we enjoyed our freedom. (Yep! Kangaroos are part of our national emblem!!! NOw they are considered a delicacy in Europe and Asia...)

    Countries will always look for ways to dis-arm its citizens. So it is up to its citizens to protect their rights to remain bearing arms. Always remember that incident when we were at war with the Japanese? The Japs didn't want to invade the US because "Americans are armed to their teeth that even a single blade of grass can kill them...? or such I remember being said...
    "Don't let the door hit ya where the dawg shudda bit ya!"
    G'day and Glock
    GATEWAY SWIFT WING ST. LOUIS

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Loffmar77 View Post
    ...the immigration laws in this country need and overhaul. By the end of my wife's immigration status change from legal alien to permanent resident, we were more familiar with forms and rules that half of the folks we had to deal with.
    You expect government employees to actually be competent? Most times that is asking WAY too much.

  6. #25
    Loffmar77,

    I do not understand why your Wife does not want to take out Citizenship, it only affects bits of paper. But has many benifits.

    My self. I gained Citizenship this year, my Wife now has her Green Card, she was awaiting a visa number b/4.

    In 3 years she can apply for Citizenship, and will, we both have British and Canadian citizenship.

    Nice to holster my Glock 19 each morning!

  7. #26
    ...Personal preference I guess. She's proud of her herritage and wants to stay Canadian only. I'm fine with that.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tucker's Mom View Post
    I have dual citizenship. I am an Australian and an American. I live here permanently and visit my house in Australia at least once a year to check that my son who lives in my house over there don't turn it into a brothel or something.. <g> so far, so good. But I tell you what, once you start living here, no matter how much you say you love your country, you either stay here or go back home. It is easy for you because Canada is just across the border and in the same mainland. I will have a lot of difficulty doing that with my original country and here. Anyway, once you got the hang of living here, no matter how great you think your country of origin is, think about it -- you can only be loyal to one country. It was how I felt after living here for a very good while, whereas I fought tooth and nails to come and live here at first. Now I will fight tooth and nails to help protect the right and the freedom I continue to enjoy living here.

    I bought my first gun while I wasn't a citizen yet. I have bought many after I became a citizen (before the boat accident), tried many that fits my little hand -- but I can't bring it with me to Oz, not even a pepper spray. I feel so helpless when I go to Oz so I make my stay as short as possible.

    Come here, live here and be a citizen...a loyal citizen. You won't regret it.
    I knew there was something I liked about you! ;-) Since you are a dual citizen, maybe you can clear some of my ignorance. How did you become a US citizen?

    I'm confused about the oath that is administered:

    "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God."

    I read the first line to mean that one gives up their citizenship to whatever land they are coming from to be a citizen of the US.

    Do you have to carry some sort of 'green card' showing your citizenship?

  9. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by walt629 View Post
    I knew there was something I liked about you! ;-)
    I guess I need to clarify that comment so as to not seem too forward! My great Grandfathers side of the family immigrated from Australia, I just recently found that we still have relatives down under.
    Last edited by walt629; 10-19-2011 at 12:35 PM. Reason: spelling

  10. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by walt629 View Post
    I knew there was something I liked about you! ;-) Since you are a dual citizen, maybe you can clear some of my ignorance. How did you become a US citizen?

    I'm confused about the oath that is administered:

    "I hereby declare, on oath, that I absolutely and entirely renounce and abjure all allegiance and fidelity to any foreign prince, potentate, state, or sovereignty of whom or which I have heretofore been a subject or citizen; that I will support and defend the Constitution and laws of the United States of America against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I will bear arms on behalf of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform noncombatant service in the Armed Forces of the United States when required by the law; that I will perform work of national importance under civilian direction when required by the law; and that I take this obligation freely without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion; so help me God."

    I read the first line to mean that one gives up their citizenship to whatever land they are coming from to be a citizen of the US.

    Do you have to carry some sort of 'green card' showing your citizenship?
    Here's a reference:
    Dual Citizenship - Countries that allow or don't allow dual citizenship with the United States

    The only and sole thing that I now like about like about being both an Australian and an American is the fact that during a tight situation, e.g., war or revolt where a citizen has to be "extracted" from another country, is the fact that British and Australians are very good at managing their rescue of its citizens. Because of my work as a photographer (in the past) I have to have my Australian citizenship. It is a must for me when I got assigned to another country.

    Take this fact as an example (real world experience this one...) : When my husband was assigned to Saudia Airlines by TWA he has to go and live in Saudi Arabia. He was a pilot trainer at the time. The first thing that the Saudis told him to do was ..."if you get into trouble, don't bother calling the American Embassy. Go straight to the British Embassy if you cannot call them up immediately...They know what to do! They are your friends, not your enemies."

    On my part, I was assigned to a troubled country once. I was told the same thing, but because we have an Australian Embassy in that country, I was told to either contact the British and/or Australian Embassy should the need to be evacuated arises. They know what to do.

    Later on, I was back home in Australia. There was trouble in that country a few months later. The Aussies were evacuated in a manageable fashion -- by buses to the nearest German port. The Aussies and the British Embassies continued to work with one another coordinating the safe spots for the buses to travel to. This was, after designating a safe place to build a tent-like structure and informing every British and Aussie nationals where to go to catch these buses. They were given two days. The Americans --- well...<hesitation here>...decided they were going to be smart: they flew their helicopters to rescue their nationals -- BUT they can only fit in so many in a helicopter...The British and Aussie nationals were rescued and brought to either Netherland and/or Germany. The Americans? -- many were left behind...
    "Don't let the door hit ya where the dawg shudda bit ya!"
    G'day and Glock
    GATEWAY SWIFT WING ST. LOUIS

  11. You do not have to be a citizen or a resident to own guns or use them in the US. The US trust me as a Canadian to hold non-resident permits for ME and NH. I also van carry in VT with out a permit. The US recognize my rights were my own country does not. Sad but true.

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