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Thread: Wounded Roadkill Question

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SE Florida
    Posts
    1,880
    I've come to the conclusion that the best solution for this dilemma is to keep an adult grizzly bear in your car at all times. Hit a deer - release the bear to put the poor creature out of its misery (and feed your car-bear as well).

    At first I thought keeping a pack of wolves in your car would be best, but that's kind of ridiculous when you really think about it.
    (Insert random tough-guy quote here)
    "See my gun?? Aren't you impressed?" - Anonymous sheepdog
    The hardware is the same, but the software is vastly different.

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  3. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Overland Park, KS
    Posts
    286

    Well...

    I hate to see something suffer, but that is what police are for. No amount of keeping an animal from suffering is worth the unlawful discharge of a firarm within so many feet of a highway and fallout from the media of gun nut goes crazy on bambi bs that the media field day will have. I dont make the rules but I do have to take the risks.

  4. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Phillip Gain View Post
    I'd probably put the animal out of its misery, so long as I could do so safely. If it were a populated area, I might call 911 or the local police non-emergency number (if I knew it), to let them know what I was doing.
    I went down that route a few times but the responses were so lackdaisickal I am not even quite sure they ever showed up. I am not very keen on shooting any animal (I am neither a hunter nor a vegetarian) but we have 4 dogs and I just don't care for seeing any animal suffer.

  5. #34
    In my area of Southwest Colorado, cars hit deer or elk frequently, especially during the rut. The accepted procedure is to call the Game and Fish Department and let them take care of it.
    Charlie

  6. #35
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Sandpoint, Idaho
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    1,315
    Quote Originally Posted by B2Tall View Post
    I've come to the conclusion that the best solution for this dilemma is to keep an adult grizzly bear in your car at all times. Hit a deer - release the bear to put the poor creature out of its misery (and feed your car-bear as well).

    At first I thought keeping a pack of wolves in your car would be best, but that's kind of ridiculous when you really think about it.
    Or the Trunk Monkey. I think the laws are less strict for them. trunk monkey with a shotgun commercial - YouTube

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    SE Florida
    Posts
    1,880
    Quote Originally Posted by localgirl View Post
    Or the Trunk Monkey. I think the laws are less strict for them. trunk monkey with a shotgun commercial - YouTube
    I like the Tunk Monkey but I prefer something with a little more "Oomph". Since I drive a full-size truck it's easy for me to carry around an XL (1000+ lbs) Car Bear.

    (Insert random tough-guy quote here)
    "See my gun?? Aren't you impressed?" - Anonymous sheepdog
    The hardware is the same, but the software is vastly different.

  8. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Northern Wisconsin
    Posts
    177
    I guess legally you should call the police/sheriff. I hate to see them suffer after being hit and the shmuck keeps going, yes it can happen no matter how big the deer is. I feel if your able to dispatch it safely and quickly why not do that. I hit a large Doe with my super duty, not a scratch on the truck but broke 3 of her legs, its a terrible feeling watching them try to get away. I shot her and removed her from the road. Legal or not it was what I felt was the best thing for the animal.

  9. #38
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    817
    Several years ago I hit a deer with my S10 pickup. It was dark, a very remote and rural area. I saw several deer and had slowed up to about 15-20 MPH. I did have time to swerve but landed up hitting the back end of the deer. I was not exactly aiming for the rear leggs but figured the deer would most likely run forward and this offered my best chance of avoiding a collision or at least minimizing the damage. (Split second decision). My one headlight was knocked out of adjustment but that was the only damage. The animal limped off into the dark. I was carrying a gun that could have taken care of things but as cold as it sounds I figured there are many coyotes and some cougars around and one of them would probably end up getting an easy meal fairly quickly. While none of us like seeing an animal suffer its not worth jail.

  10. If you are going to end the suffering of an animal call the 9-1-1 dispatch center, explain to them where you are, what the condition of the deer is in, and if the deer is going to cause another accident. Ask them if they can ask the responding deputy, police officer or state trooper for permission and the method you wish to end the suffering - gun, knife or an object like a tire iron. This should release you from liability that occurred when you end the suffering - but don't count on it.

    With the above being said, you need to have the training on how to properly dispatch animals in public. I know it sounds odd but lots of law enforcement officers, mainly deputies and troopers, go through training on how to properly dispatch animals - mainly safety concerns of the surrounding area and the deer injuring you in the process. Depending on your state, it may be law that only a law enforcement officers can be the only one to determine and dispatch wildlife.

    Setting up some road flares, reflective triangles and waiting can be still helpful if you're instructed not to dispatch the deer. If you do dispatch the deer without permission, there is a chance you will be charged with illegally discharging a firearm, poaching and possibly having your insurance not pay for the damage - if they can prove that you purposefully hit the deer with your vehicle.

  11. As has been discussed, calling a LEO/Game Warden is usually the most prudent thing to do! Just to CYA!
    Next, hitting any animal, hard enough to injure it, the meat is usually ruined anyway. Either by the increased adrenaline produced due to the injury or the bruising of the meat typically makes it foul tasting or totally inedible.
    Many homeless shelters any more refuse to take road kill or injured animals that have been put down by either an individual or LEO!
    In some jurisdictions (i.e. remote areas) a county dispatcher will first ask if there are any human injuries or incapacitated vehicles, then, depending on whether or not a LEO/Game Warden is available, may ask you if you have a means to put the animal out of its misery, if not, they tell you to go about your business, if so, they will ask you if you are willing to put the animal down, and make sure it is off the roadway, thank you, and hang up!
    In any case, you would need that phone call to dispatch more than likely to substantiate your insurance claim on the vehicle!

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