Step into the twilight zone of calibers - Page 2
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Thread: Step into the twilight zone of calibers

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by misunderstood View Post
    Cool. Never heard of the 32-20.
    Some say it is the first Magnum cartridge. Article on them is at [Guest Post] .32-20 WCF: The First ?Magnum? Pistol Cartridge? | The Firearm Blog
    A .32 S&W Long with bullet is the same height as the casing for the .32-20 WCF. Both use the same size bullets. Here are both rounds side by side. .38 SPL on left, .32-20 WCF, .32 S&W Long, .22 LR.Step into the twilight zone of calibers-photo140.jpg
    Last edited by S&W645; 05-06-2013 at 08:28 PM. Reason: changed picture for better size comparisons
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  3. #12
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    Just put a gauge on the 3 that I have and all were between 12 and 14 LBS on double action. Between 7 and 9 LBS on single action.

    Am I lucky? What gives?



    Quote Originally Posted by S&W645 View Post
    I have also seen that figure quoted before. Now just waiting for a Nagant pistol to show up reasonably priced.
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  4. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by MADnMO View Post
    Just put a gauge on the 3 that I have and all were between 12 and 14 LBS on double action. Between 7 and 9 LBS on single action.

    Am I lucky? What gives?
    They may have had trigger jobs somewhere along the way. According to some, factory specs were 20# DA and 12-13# on SA.
    Quote Originally Posted by surplusrifle.com
    The downside of this design is that the pistol has a 13 lb. single action trigger pull (trigger's only function is to release the hammer, the hammer must be manually cocked each time) and a 20 lb. double action trigger pull (trigger is responsible for both cocking and releasing the hammer in one motion).
    The Nagant M1895 can also shoot resized and reloaded .32-20 WCF casings.
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  5. #14
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    And for some interesting reading on how to lighten the trigger pull, see Surplusrifle Forum ? View topic - How to adjust the trigger pull of the 1895 Nagant revolver Seems even the Russians did it.
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  6. #15
    My grandfather had an old .32 S&W Long CTG hand ejector model that I inherited. Lots of these around but I guess it is somewhat odd due to not being very popular this century.

  7. #16
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    1) Not sure if its "unusual" or not, but it is hard to find sometimes. .30 carbine for my Ruger Blackhawk.

    I have never shot a gun with a more vicious muzzle blast than that gun/cal combo (painful thru 2 layers of hearing protection). Also found that rounds that functioned in the carbine showed excessive pressure signs in the revolver, and loads that ejected easily from the revolver short-stroked in the carbine. Anybody else observed this?

    2) Love me some .30 Tok. Not weird at all.
    Better to perish in the struggle for freedom than live to see defeat. There ARE things to be feared more than death. The fyrd is a Constitutional imperative.

  8. My poor old trigger pull gauge only goes 8lbs, and it doesnt go high enough. Other than that the heaviest gauge I have is a fishing scale that goes to 20 lbs. After repurposing it (I.e bending the hook straitish and padding it with rubber tape) my 1895 nagant breaks at about 9 lbs single action, and exceeds the scales 20 lb max on double action, feels pretty close to 25 lbs. After some practice dry fire with empties, every other gun I own, including my other revolvers, feel like the trigger pulls are nothing. As for pricing, I got mine at cabelas with a $20 off coupon, usually they and gander mountain have them for $150. Still a good deal, though they may show up in the used counter at your local gun shop or show for less.

  9. #18
    Not really into all the older guns and obsolete or obscure calibers. Love to look at them and learn from them but I prefer to shoot and practice with modern guns that are practical today.

    My father-in-law had an old .30 Remington, pump-action carbine ranch rifle that got from his father-in-law that was pretty cool. Never shot it because like me he's into newer guns so he never felt like custom ordering ammo for it. Looked awesome though. The tube magazine was twisted into a slight spiral. Never clicked with me why that was until the dealer he sold it to explained that the .30 Rem was a Spitzer round. The spiral made the rounds sit off centered from each other so the rounds wouldn't set each other off if dropped. Old solution to still common problem. The predecessor to the soft-polymer-tipped rounds used in tube mag. carbines today.

  10. #19
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    When my brother-in-law passed away, he willed to me his lever action rifle. It shoots true and was hitting steel target 100 yds away with the open sights. It is chambered in .38-55. It was the first time I had heard of that caliber.

    It's a beautiful long gun and I only shot it on the 1 year anniversary of his death. Today it is highly polished and in a glass case in my living room.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
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  11. I'm told the .38-55 still has a following in places like the Maine woods, in deer season.
    I think it was the original caliber for the Model 1894.
    I seem to recall there are three rounds, large/medium/small, that have almost the same trajectories.
    The .45-70 is the big one, .38-55 the middle one, and .32-40 the small one.

    I guess my "odd" one is 38-40. All these years of avoiding the ".40 Short & Weak" as JD Jones calls it (I'm a .45 ACP guy), and I end up with a "forty" that has almost the same exterior ballistics. Yes, it's a .40 caliber. This particular old round is written "backward." I guess someone didn't want to call it .40-38, but it's a .44-40 that was necked down to .40 and loaded with 38 grains of black powder.

    I've always had a soft spot for the Model 1892, and I found a fair deal on a nice rifle at a time when I had a few bucks. It turned out to be a .38-40 instead of .44-40, but it's mine now. This slick old rifle is fun to shoot, virtually recoil free, and "takes you back." I suppose a Kel-tec Sub 2000 in .40 would be more Tacti-cool, but this hundred year old rifle is still functional and would do fine at defending the homestead.

    Now I am looking for one more bullet mold and G-H sizer, though....
    “The police of a State should never be stronger or better armed than the citizenry. An armed citizenry, willing to fight is the foundation of civil freedom.” Heinlein

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