First Aid Tip
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Thread: First Aid Tip

  1. #1

    First Aid Tip

    A police officer recommended to my wife (a nurse practitioner) that we put a few tampons in the first aid kit in our range bag. She (the officer) said they're great for treating bullet wounds. I had to get my wife to go to the store for them, not because I was embarrassed to buy them, but because I had no idea what caliber tampon to buy.

  2.   
  3. #2
    Ive heard this before but I dont like the idea of shoving things into wounds.

  4. If I've been shot and the quickest most effective way I have of stopping the bleeding is a tampon, I'd have no problem using it.

    A lot quicker and easier than trying to field dress a wound on myself, depending on location. Plus it would likely keep one hand free to keep a hold of my weapon (assuming being shot didn't cause me to freak and drop my gun and not think to get it back).

    I can train for high adrenaline to an extent, I can train for all different types of situations, but haven't figured out how to train for defense after already being shot. Maybe being shot bare chested with a paintball and immediately try to hit multiple targets.

  5. #4
    As my wife pointed out, they at least have a retrieval string.

  6. #5
    I can see the upside of this, but there would be a downside too. First of all, you would not want to push the whole thing in under the skin. String or no string, they have been known to come off. Second, they expand. A lot. What goes in easily will not come out easily through the same hole. I'd say if you do this, you would not want a .40 caliber size. You'd want the .22 caliber. (Beginner size) Because even that will probably be at least a .50 caliber size when you go to take it out.

  7. #6
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    They are recommended in part because the are sterile, individually packaged and relatively cheap...


    Sent from behind enemy lines.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesMorrison View Post
    They are recommended in part because the are sterile, individually packaged and relatively cheap...


    Sent from behind enemy lines.
    I'm not sure who is recommending this...but they shouldn't be.

    Tampons are usually not sterile to begin with.

    Penetrating extremity wounds are best stopped with external management. Direct pressure, if that doesn't stop it apply a tourniquet.

    A tampon will not stop internal bleeding, but if used will hide that bleeding. If any fragments, bone or metal, are in the wound cavity, shoving objects into that cavity will cause more damage. As Peggy stated, they do expand a lot, which will also cause more damage. If the bullet or fragment hasn't gone through a vein or artery...pushing a tampon in very well could cause that.

    Penetrating wound injuries to the chest or neck require a seal to stop air from entering.

    The only way to stop uncontrolled extremity bleeding is a tourniquet and surgery. The only way to stop uncontrolled bleeding in the torso is surgery.
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

  9. #8
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    This what a lot of police departments keep on duty. It's got a clotting agent within the gauze, the gauze can be shaped according to the wound, and it can easily be removed.

    QuikClot Combat Gauze
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  10. #9
    Tampons are excellent first aid for GSW's. Don't push them into a wound (ideally) and secure it with a wrap (extremities) or tape well (trunk). If they expand, all the better. The first step to stop bleeding is to apply direct pressure, and the expansion would assist. For bleeding 1. apply direct pressure with sterile or at least clean dressing, 2. elevate the wound above the heart, 3. if you know where the artery that feeds the area is, and the bleeding hasn't stopped, "pressure point" on arteries, or even just above the wound (between the wound and the heart). The glamorous tourniquet is almost never needed if you've done the previous steps. In 30 years as an EMT, ER Trauma Nurse Specialist, CPR and First Aid instructor I have never seen a wound that required a tourniquet pre hospital. (We sometimes use them in the ER to stop bleeding while suturing). An ideal tourniquet would be a blood pressure cuff, since a narrow one would do further damage as a "crush injury." Except in the case of lawyers, IRS and NSA employees, in which case I urge you to always apply a tourniquet around the throat.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul53 View Post
    Tampons are excellent first aid for GSW's. Don't push them into a wound (ideally) and secure it with a wrap (extremities) or tape well (trunk). If they expand, all the better. The first step to stop bleeding is to apply direct pressure, and the expansion would assist. For bleeding 1. apply direct pressure with sterile or at least clean dressing, 2. elevate the wound above the heart, 3. if you know where the artery that feeds the area is, and the bleeding hasn't stopped, "pressure point" on arteries, or even just above the wound (between the wound and the heart). The glamorous tourniquet is almost never needed if you've done the previous steps. In 30 years as an EMT, ER Trauma Nurse Specialist, CPR and First Aid instructor I have never seen a wound that required a tourniquet pre hospital. (We sometimes use them in the ER to stop bleeding while suturing). An ideal tourniquet would be a blood pressure cuff, since a narrow one would do further damage as a "crush injury." Except in the case of lawyers, IRS and NSA employees, in which case I urge you to always apply a tourniquet around the throat.
    Where did you work? 30 years with no tourniquet? ... That is very surprising.

    Not even half your years and I've applied a least a dozen tourniquet's...6 years ago ems stopped doing pressure points and elevation for hemorrhage control. They are not even in the PHTLS curriculum anymore.

    How do you purpose fixing a pneumo with a tampon fully expanded in a chest wound? Most people don't carry around 12g catheters outside a ER...

    I know military use that combat gauze...but it hasn't made its way into the ems system yet, so I can't say anything on that. Looks pretty cool though.
    “One of the illusions of life is that the present hour is not the critical, decisive one.” – Ralph Waldo Emerson

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