Question of the Day: Do The Cops Know You’re A Gun Owner? - Page 6
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Thread: Question of the Day: Do The Cops Know You’re A Gun Owner?

  1. Quote Originally Posted by jcreek View Post
    Is this relatively new?
    Looking at the RCWs, it seems like that the ability of the Department of Licensing to keep the data was effective in 1994.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

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  3. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by jcreek View Post
    Is this relatively new? About 5 years ago I had my house burglarized and a handgun was stolen. At the time I naively wasn't keeping track of the serial numbers. When I made the police report, they asked me for the serial number, and I told them I didn't have it. They told me they didn't keep any direct record of handgun ownership and that the only way I could get it was to go to the dealer I bought it at and have them check the 4473. Obviously, they could have done this but I guess they just wanted me to do the leg work myself. Point being, when they responded to my house to take the report, as far as they told me, they had no idea that I owned guns or what the make, model, or serial was and would have to go through the same steps I would to get it.
    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Looking at the RCWs, it seems like that the ability of the Department of Licensing to keep the data was effective in 1994.
    So obviously, either the LE agency you made the inquiry of trained the NSA, or the NSA trained them, in data collection and what's "best" for American citizens to know about same.
    No one has ever heard me say that I "hate" cops, because I don't. This is why I will never trust one again though: You just never know...

  4. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Looking at the RCWs, it seems like that the ability of the Department of Licensing to keep the data was effective in 1994.
    Hey Navy! Glad to see your back. We here have missed your posts!
    ~Responsible people who understand that their personal protection is up to them, provide themselves with protection. Those that don't have only themselves to blame.~Proud NRA ~SAF~GoA Member~

  5. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Looking at the RCWs, it seems like that the ability of the Department of Licensing to keep the data was effective in 1994.
    Navy, long time no hear. How are you?
    GOD, GUNS and GUITARS

  6. #55
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    Going back to the original post, and being of the opinion that all cops are not Nazi's, here's a theory based on the following quote:

    "The other day I was listening to Kittitas County [WA] Dispatch send a Deputy to a reported domestic violence call"
    What if the info is available, but there are only certain instances where the dispatcher will go to the added effort of securing this info for the safety of the officer on scene? If this is the case, and it was protocol for them to do this only for certain calls (DV would definitely be one of those), is this a problem?
    -
    Before you jump down my throat, I'm undecided. If I was the cop that info would be handy. On the other hand, if I am going to a DV call I'm gonna assume the worst anyway and prepare for it.
    -
    Thoughts? Is the scenario described possible? If so is it a problem?

  7. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by whodat2710 View Post
    Going back to the original post, and being of the opinion that all cops are not Nazi's, here's a theory based on the following quote:



    What if the info is available, but there are only certain instances where the dispatcher will go to the added effort of securing this info for the safety of the officer on scene? If this is the case, and it was protocol for them to do this only for certain calls (DV would definitely be one of those), is this a problem?
    -
    Before you jump down my throat, I'm undecided. If I was the cop that info would be handy. On the other hand, if I am going to a DV call I'm gonna assume the worst anyway and prepare for it.
    -
    Thoughts? Is the scenario described possible? If so is it a problem?
    I think, if I was a cop on the way to a DV, I would most definitely want to know if there were firearms in the house. Legal in all states? Do know, but I would want to know! I like being alive. It's a failing, I know.
    ~Responsible people who understand that their personal protection is up to them, provide themselves with protection. Those that don't have only themselves to blame.~Proud NRA ~SAF~GoA Member~

  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by gejoslin View Post
    I like being alive. It's a failing, I know.
    -imageuploadedbytapatalk-21371605864.113321.jpg


    Sent from behind enemy lines.

  9. Quote Originally Posted by whodat2710 View Post
    Going back to the original post, and being of the opinion that all cops are not Nazi's, here's a theory based on the following quote:

    What if the info is available, but there are only certain instances where the dispatcher will go to the added effort of securing this info for the safety of the officer on scene? If this is the case, and it was protocol for them to do this only for certain calls (DV would definitely be one of those), is this a problem?
    -
    Before you jump down my throat, I'm undecided. If I was the cop that info would be handy. On the other hand, if I am going to a DV call I'm gonna assume the worst anyway and prepare for it.
    -
    Thoughts? Is the scenario described possible? If so is it a problem?
    Well, first - in order for that info to be availalbe in the first place, there must be some form of firearms registration required.... that's the first problem I see.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  10. Quote Originally Posted by gejoslin View Post
    Hey Navy! Glad to see your back. We here have missed your posts!
    Quote Originally Posted by BC1 View Post
    Navy, long time no hear. How are you?
    Thanks! I am deployed on USS Nimitz. Bandwidth issues.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  11. Quote Originally Posted by whodat2710 View Post
    Going back to the original post, and being of the opinion that all cops are not Nazi's, here's a theory based on the following quote:

    What if the info is available, but there are only certain instances where the dispatcher will go to the added effort of securing this info for the safety of the officer on scene? If this is the case, and it was protocol for them to do this only for certain calls (DV would definitely be one of those), is this a problem?
    -
    Before you jump down my throat, I'm undecided. If I was the cop that info would be handy. On the other hand, if I am going to a DV call I'm gonna assume the worst anyway and prepare for it.
    -
    Thoughts? Is the scenario described possible? If so is it a problem?
    Quote Originally Posted by gejoslin View Post
    I think, if I was a cop on the way to a DV, I would most definitely want to know if there were firearms in the house. Legal in all states? Do know, but I would want to know! I like being alive. It's a failing, I know.
    You get a call of a woman screaming at the Joe Smith residence. You get information from dispatch that Joe Smith has purchased 5 handguns in the last 2 years from retail delears. Based upon that information, do you increase your awareness/response? If you do increase your awareness/response - then that means conversely that you have less awareness/response without that information. THAT, in my humble opinion is what will get the officer injured or killed. Does the knowledge that Joe Smith has lawfully purchased firearms in the past really tell you anything about the situation at Joe Smith's house? NO. Having the knowledge of lawful firearms purchases, imho, is an extremely false and thin security blanket that offers no real security at all, especially if the officers are changing their response/level of awareness based only on that information.

    Maybe, the one instance where I see that it might be considered is if it is reported that Joe Smith very recently purchased a firearm, and now there is a report of a woman screaming.

    It's kind of like the inform or not argument during a traffic stop. Should the officer be more relaxed and less stressed because I tell them about a gun and show them a permit? In my humble opinion, absolutely not. Are you just going to take my word for it that the driver's license I am showing you is valid? No officer that I have ever known does. So why would you make the same assumption just because a person tells you about a gun and shows you a permit? What are you going to do if you leave the gun with the stopped driver, then go back and find out their permit is revoked/expired/not valid for some reason?
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

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