Question of the Day: Do The Cops Know You’re A Gun Owner? - Page 8
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Thread: Question of the Day: Do The Cops Know You’re A Gun Owner?

  1. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by S&W645 View Post
    Not the way I was taught back in the 70s. You entered every DV situation as though a fight/gun fight was going to happen. And you, the officer, were going to be the target. From both sides. Statistics showed back then that there was a high rate of where both parties would turn on the officer who responded and normally two were dispatched for that reason.
    So are you saying you would not want to know ahead of time if there was a gun in the house?

    I sure would. DVs are a nightmare and I want as much info as I can get before going in. Always need to be prepared for anything, but knowing there are guns in there means we need to secure them as one of our top priorities.

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  3. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by Deserteagle View Post
    So are you saying you would not want to know ahead of time if there was a gun in the house?

    I sure would. DVs are a nightmare and I want as much info as I can get before going in. Always need to be prepared for anything, but knowing there are guns in there means we need to secure them as one of our top priorities.
    I'll give you the same answer that the Monroe County ( FL ) deputy gave me when I got my CW&FL a few years ago. Always treat them as if someone has a gun. You'll live longer that way. Same training I got 40 years ago. Florida is not a state that currently ties the CW&FL to your DL. Nor does the state allow direct access to that info by law. As a former state employee who did payroll, even FOIA info on my DL is blocked except for LEOs, DH&MVS, and courts.
    NRA Certified Pistol Instructor
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    Normal is an illusion. What is normal to the spider is chaos to the fly.

  4. It would be interesting to see statistics regarding firearms registration v. officer injuries/deaths due to firearms. California police officers should be some of the safest in the United States and have the lowest rate of deaths from firearms due to their registration requirements, right? So, if the data shows (and I'll bet you that it will) that firearms registration and thus "knowing who is armed and who isn't" doesn't make any difference regarding officer safety from firearms (or maybe even the death rate is higher in states like California), what does that tell us?

    This a pretty interesting table. Of course, the data is next to worthless without knowing how many total police officers there are in a state so you can figure out a rate v. just the total number:

    http://www.fbi.gov/about-us/cjis/ucr...ables/table-28
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  5. #74
    Good question.. I know of no way here they would have model specific info, etc. Only those states like Illinois with FOID cards and every purchase is registered, would I think they would even have that info.
    I don't think Washington does any of that , do they ?

  6. Quote Originally Posted by eagleks View Post
    Good question.. I know of no way here they would have model specific info, etc. Only those states like Illinois with FOID cards and every purchase is registered, would I think they would even have that info.
    I don't think Washington does any of that , do they ?
    Did you read my post #47?

    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    Might want to research the Revised Code of Washington. In Washington State for the sale of handguns, the dealers are required by state law to fill out a state form similar to a form 4473. It is called an Application to Purchase a Handgun, or something similar. That form is forwarded to the LEO agency servicing the FFL. If a Washington CPL number is recorded on that form, the dealer can deliver the handgun immediately to the buyer upon receiving approval from NICS, and the LEO agency uses the Application to Purchase a Handgun form to perform additional state level background checks.

    If there is no Washington CPL number recorded on the form, the dealer must wait 5 business days for the LEO agency to run the background checks and approve the purchase before delivering the handgun.

    Here's the kicker. State law also requires a copy of the Application to Purchase Handguns to be delivered to the Washington State Department of Licensing, who keeps a database of every handgun sold by a dealer in Washington State, make model and serial number, and all the information associated with the sale including identity of the buyer, driver's license number and CPL number if used. Thus, given any one piece of info, all the other info can be obtained including exactly which handguns were purchased from dealers in Washington by make, model and serial number.

    This is not a "gun registration" (so the state claims) because only handguns at retail from dealers are recorded. Private sales are not.

    RCW 9.41.090 and 9.41.129 are the applicable Washington State laws. So, the exact answer to the OP's question in Washington state is that law enforcement does NOT know what firearms I currently own - but they do know which handguns I have purchased from Washington state dealers in the past.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  7. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by S&W645 View Post
    Ohio local PD would also know if you ever bought more than one handgun in a seven day period from one FFL. And that would include make, model, and serial number. Some PDs just look at it then shred. Others may store the data.
    Got an ORC reference for that? I know a few people who'd like to see it.
    Posterity: you will never know how much it has cost my generation to preserve your freedom. I hope you will make good use of it.--- John Quincy Adams
    Condensed Guide To Ohio Concealed Carry Laws

  8. Best MO for DV calls is backup...lots of it. I can't believe the times I've seen on Cops or other shows how quickly the battered complainant turns on the LEOs as soon as the perp is taken-down and cuffed! Add more drunk/drugged-up family members/friends, and things seem to get ugly quickly.

    You may see the, "OH SH**" on the cops faces when they get a DV call. Especially a repeat.

    EDIT: Comment About Toilet Paper Hanging (somewhere in this thread)

    If the thundermug is very close to the dispenser, the roll should always unroll to the back.

    If the thundermug is far from the dispenser, the roll should always unroll from the front.

    If somebody wants to argue that in my house, then somebody's goin' with the po' po'!

  9. #78
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino View Post
    Got an ORC reference for that? I know a few people who'd like to see it.
    It isn't Ohio's rule. It is a requirement of the ATF. You'll find it noted on the Form 4473 and online at http://www.atf.gov/files/forms/downl...f-f-3310-4.pdf for the actual form. Our ATF supplied form 3310 comes as a 3 part form. By law, the CLEOs are supposed to destroy the info after 6 months if the person is a "non-prohibited person". Now the question would more likely be, do you trust the local CLEO? And do you trust the BATFE not to have it in a database? The FFL involved has to keep a copy of it with the Form(s) 4473.
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