Self-Defense Shooting is NOT Bullseye Shooting
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Thread: Self-Defense Shooting is NOT Bullseye Shooting

  1. #1
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    Self-Defense Shooting is NOT Bullseye Shooting

    When I was a new shooter, I obsessed over putting every round I shot into the bullseye (ok, sure, I still do!), but ... it is very important to understand the difference between self-defense accuracy, or "combat accuracy," if you will, and putting rounds in bullseyes.

    The adrenelin is pumping, everything is a blur, you are afraid, shocked and scared for your life....the goal is to get rounds into center mass.

    To put it bluntly, putting as many holes in the center mass of an assailant is the BEST WAY to stop a threat. Obsessing over trying to get all the shots into the same hole is actually going to slow you down in a self-defense situation where the goal is always: TO STOP THE THREAT.

    Here's a video explanation of the concept. Simply put, if you are getting rounds into a center mass area that is about the size of your open hand, or thereabouts, you are doing just fine.

    VIDEO HERE.
    My YouTube gun and shooting channel: VDMA VIDEOS.
    Member of: NRA (Life/Endowment); GOA (Life); SAF (Life); NSSF (Media); NAGR; CCRTKBA

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  3. #2
    FWIW I advocate training with 8 inch paper plates. if you can consistently place your shots into the plate at distances from 0 to 15 feet or so away you should be comfortable with your SD capabilities.

  4. #3
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    That's good advice, I've grown to prefer training with 6" reactive targets, but a paper plate will certainly do too.
    My YouTube gun and shooting channel: VDMA VIDEOS.
    Member of: NRA (Life/Endowment); GOA (Life); SAF (Life); NSSF (Media); NAGR; CCRTKBA

  5. #4
    Great topic and one that I reinforce to my students during every class. Most people go the range and lob 100 or so rounds at the paper but never give a second thought to the effects of adrenaline, increased heart rate and all of the physiological effects that occur when someone else is potentially attacking YOU! Anyone can go to the range and work on nice tight groupings, and while that it vitally important to proper shooting fundamentals, it is also only half the equation when it comes to self-defense shooting.

    Train for the unexpected, and let every exercise at the range teach you something new. If you have a malfunction, condition yourself to perform the tap, rack, bang instead of simply clearing it the slow way. Try not to idly stand there squared up to the target, but rather shoot off hand, one handed, shoot from retention etc... Try operating and shooting your gun left handed and work on pure self-defense shooting, with the intent of landing shots in the center of mass as the video described. Work on double/triple taps with the goal of getting two or three shots on target as accurately as possible. If you have a range that allows it, try shooting on the move and think about how your target won't be idly standing 21 feet from you taking every shot you send his/her direction.

    To quote Ben Branam - "Your mind is the weapon, your gun is only the tool".
    "No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms." - Thomas Jefferson

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  6. #5
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    Thank you for your insights and suggestions, appreciate it.
    My YouTube gun and shooting channel: VDMA VIDEOS.
    Member of: NRA (Life/Endowment); GOA (Life); SAF (Life); NSSF (Media); NAGR; CCRTKBA

  7. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by jblyth View Post
    Great topic and one that I reinforce to my students during every class. Most people go the range and lob 100 or so rounds at the paper but never give a second thought to the effects of adrenaline, increased heart rate and all of the physiological effects that occur when someone else is potentially attacking YOU! Anyone can go to the range and work on nice tight groupings, and while that it vitally important to proper shooting fundamentals, it is also only half the equation when it comes to self-defense shooting.

    Train for the unexpected, and let every exercise at the range teach you something new. If you have a malfunction, condition yourself to perform the tap, rack, bang instead of simply clearing it the slow way. Try not to idly stand there squared up to the target, but rather shoot off hand, one handed, shoot from retention etc... Try operating and shooting your gun left handed and work on pure self-defense shooting, with the intent of landing shots in the center of mass as the video described. Work on double/triple taps with the goal of getting two or three shots on target as accurately as possible. If you have a range that allows it, try shooting on the move and think about how your target won't be idly standing 21 feet from you taking every shot you send his/her direction.

    To quote Ben Branam - "Your mind is the weapon, your gun is only the tool".
    I wish I had a dollar for every guy at the range who carefully stood in a perfect Weaver or Isosceles stance and took precise aim before carefully squeezed off each shot to make a very tight grouping in his target... then turned and said that a bad guy better not screw with HIM! by GOD!...

    If possible folks need to practice self defense shooting in ways they would never think they would have to... like drawing while falling on their butts because the bad guy knocked them down (PRACTICE THIS WITH AN UNLOADED GUN!). Or shooting while laying on their backs on the ground. Or shooting while running to the side.. or away.. or even to... the attacker.

    And airsoft guns + cardboard silhouettes inside the house are fantastic practice for preparing for home invasions or clearing the house... and contrary to the popular belief that no one should ever try to clear their house there are times when it is necessary to get from one end of the house to the other to protect your kids while waiting for the police so the "stay in a safe room and don't clear your house" advice just doesn't work for everyone.

    Not to mention I keep asking how many folks come home from work or from shopping and don't clear their house but walk in dumb and happy just assuming no one broke in while they were gone and is still hiding inside?

    The OP's video was very good... please let me add this comment:

    Under ordinary circumstance the center of mass would be the middle of an attacker's chest but, just as it is wise to practice to defend yourself even when you find yourself knocked on your arse, it is wise to understand that the center of mass is merely the middle of the biggest part of your attacker you have a shot at. If all you have a shot at is his knee then the middle of his knee is "center of mass".

    Sadly many trainers neglect to mention that about the center of mass and many students come away with the idea that if they don't have a shot at the chest then they just don't have a shot at all.

  8. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by apvbguy View Post
    FWIW I advocate training with 8 inch paper plates. if you can consistently place your shots into the plate at distances from 0 to 15 feet or so away you should be comfortable with your SD capabilities.
    Sound advise. I feel that as long as I can get all the rounds in the kill zone rapid fire at 15 yds I'm doing good.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior1256 View Post
    Sound advise. I feel that as long as I can get all the rounds in the kill zone rapid fire at 15 yds I'm doing good.
    15 yards? at that distance why aren't you running away or finding cover?

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Warrior1256 View Post
    Sound advise. I feel that as long as I can get all the rounds in the kill zone rapid fire at 15 yds I'm doing good.
    I hope you meant 15 ft... Anyway, I personally like the 8" plate for starters then gradually get smaller. Before downsizing though, remember that the goal isn't just to hit the plate a good % of the time, the goal is to hit the plate 100% of the time. I also like the FBI "Q" targets that just have boxes for center mass and head, rather than concentric circles. Simple "go" "no-go" with no points for the guy being "dead-er"

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by whodat2710 View Post
    Simple "go" "no-go" with no points for the guy being "dead-er"
    correct, you don't get added points for neatness. hitting the off switch is sufficient

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