How many times do you chamber a round?

View Poll Results: How many times do you chamber a round?

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  • One

    3 7.89%
  • 2-5 times

    12 31.58%
  • 6-10 times

    5 13.16%
  • 11-20 times

    1 2.63%
  • 21+

    0 0%
  • Until I shoot it

    17 44.74%
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Thread: How many times do you chamber a round?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    How many times do you chamber a round?

    Here is a question that was just emailed to me by one of our members:

    If I carry a loaded/chambered round and unload it when I get home, how many times can I chamber the same bullet/round without a crimping problem on that round?
    Personally, I've always used the same round until I shot it the next time I went to the range. What is the consensus here?


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  3. #2
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    I keep an eye on .45ACP other than that I'm not aware of any other round known to be prone to set back
    See, it's mumbo jumbo like that and skinny little lizards like you thinking they the last dragon that gives Kung Fu a bad name.
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  4. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by lukem View Post
    Personally, I've always used the same round until I shot it the next time I went to the range. What is the consensus here?
    About 6-10 times for me.
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  5. #4
    Once I chamber a round, it remains chambered until I either go to the range (practice) or have to clean the gun. If it goes to the range, it is fired and if it removed due to weapon maintenance, it is set aside for later use at the range as practice ammo.
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  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Treo View Post
    I keep an eye on .45ACP other than that I'm not aware of any other round known to be prone to set back
    9mm also can be driven back in the casing. In fact, any round that doesn't get crimped in can do it. I have a couple 9s right now that are that way and need the bullets pulled and redone.

    As to the original question, I rotate the ones in the mag if I unchamber a round. It might take a year to get back to the original round and by then, it should have already been shot at the range. So 2 or 3 at max.
    Last edited by S&W645; 07-03-2013 at 12:12 PM. Reason: spelling error
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  7. #6
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    .40 cal is another round that's prone to set back. With the .40 cal, the over pressure can be "explosive".

    Really, any round that is not properly constructed can experience set back.

    YMMV


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  8. #7
    Join Date
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    Mine stays chambered unless I'm cleaning or at the range. If if unchamber a SD round to use FMJs at the range I inspect the round and rotate to the bottom of the magazine. This has been my standard practice for several years now and I've not experienced any problems with setback.



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  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by S&W645 View Post
    As to the original question, I rotate the ones in the mag if I unchamber a round. It might take a year to get back to the original round and by then, it should have already been shot at the range. So 2 or 3 at max.
    Exactly what I was going to say.

    I'll add that I've never had a problem with "crimping" that the original question was posed about, reinterpreted in subsequent posts to be referring to bullet "set back" (I think), whether in .45s or 9mms.

    Blues
    No one has ever heard me say that I "hate" cops, because I don't. This is why I will never trust one again though: You just never know...

  10. #9
    It is not difficult to detect a small amount of wear on a round that has been chambered repeatedly, particularly a hollow point. When I unload my self-defense (semi-auto) firearms I always inspect the previously chambered round. If I detect any wear on it, it goes in the range ammo box. If I see no defects or wear I re-sequence it in the magazine so I am rarely chambering that same round more than once (maybe twice) in a six month period, and certainly not over and over (I shoot out my “duty” ammo and replace it at least every six months). Having said this, I have never personally seen a failure to feed or extract that I could solely attribute to a round that had been chambered more than once, or even repeatedly. I have seen a failure to feed from a damaged hollow point round that was damaged when a magazine was dropped, happened to land on the exposed top hollow point round, which was slightly deformed due to the weight of a full magazine and a hard surface. Regardless, I recommend what I think is a reasonable precaution against a potential cause of a malfunction in a self-defense firearm. You want a self-defense firearm to work flawlessly, and not be doing a failure to feed or extract drill due to a worn bullet or casing when your life or someone else’s is on the line. It’s a small, easy, and quick thing to inspect the round, replace it if it shows any defect, and “rotate” another round into the chamber.

  11. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluesStringer View Post
    Exactly what I was going to say.

    I'll add that I've never had a problem with "crimping" that the original question was posed about, reinterpreted in subsequent posts to be referring to bullet "set back" (I think), whether in .45s or 9mms.

    Blues
    Yep, the original is about setback and crimping of the front of the casing ala rounds for a Nagant 1895 pistol.

    My crimping was to mean where the casing has a rolled crimp to keep the bullet in a fixed location. Like on my Colt Police Positive Special's .32-20WCF rounds. They won't get setback in a repeating rifle and they sure won't in the revolver.How many times do you chamber a round?-691px-32-20_wcf_25-20_winchester.jpg The Winchester rounds are actually narrower between the point where the bullet sits and the tapered rear of the casing. When fired, that narrowed band swells to form a taper between the rear and the neck.
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