Why people don't train. - Page 3
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Thread: Why people don't train.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
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    Forget firearms training, let's focus on doing anything. Why do people do anything? They either have a desire or feel the need to do it. If they don't do something it's either because they don't feel the need or they don't have a desire to do it.

    I know a lot of folks who have huge arsenals and haven't fired most of their firearms in years, sometimes decades. They have surrounded themselves with so many firearms that they feel they are always protected.

    I know others that only have one or two firearms... they feel they have overcome the hurdle of getting "some protection" that they are now done.

    Still there are others who go out 2x a month or more to the range. They perform static and dynamic exercises at the range. When not at the range, they do many different types of dry fire drills and holstering practice. I have found this is the smallest group of firearms owners out there. They are the ones that either have a strong desire or have seen a real need and have placed their utilization of firearms at top priority in their lives.

    It all comes down to what priority level one puts their firearms in their life. Many things can trump time away from a firearm. For example, is it right to not spend time with your son, because you needed to spend time on the range to keep your son protected? Well great, your son will be protected but you won't have a relationship with him. Or, is it right not to work those two or three jobs to put food on the table... you know you could really use that time out on the range? Everyone's situation is different.

    Range-time consists of two major components: actual time (a lot of people don't have that), and money (a lot of people don't have that either). Two great excuses not to train as much as you think you need to. But what if you are someone who has both time and money. That person, if not training, just doesn't place it as high of a priority compared to other things in his life.

    Personally, I feel if someone is going to go down the road of gun ownership for self-protection, one should find the time to continually train and be proficient with it in a variety of different scenarios.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  2.   
  3. Availability of good, reasonable priced facilities impacts many IMHO. Ammo is an issue but punching paper is not training.

  4. too much gun

    In addition to lack of time and money, I think a lot of people, especially women, don't train because they buy too much gun, which is unpleasant to shoot.

    Saw a poster here not long ago, who was all proud that his wife finally got a CWP, and chose to buy the S&W 642 Airweight at the gunshow for her first purse gun.

    That's a 15-ounce gun, which is painful to shoot after less than a box of ammo. Most likely, she will go to the range once with it, and will learn how uncomfortable it can get during practice. After that, my bet is that she will avoid shooting it more than once a year, if that, for as long as she carries it.

    There are a lot of people like that, and not only women, who get these tiny, light guns in duty calibers, which are unpleasant to shoot for practice. Then going to the range becomes like going to the dentist.

  5. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by 7yFQQd View Post
    In addition to lack of time and money, I think a lot of people, especially women, don't train because they buy too much gun, which is unpleasant to shoot.

    Saw a poster here not long ago, who was all proud that his wife finally got a CWP, and chose to buy the S&W 642 Airweight at the gunshow for her first purse gun.

    That's a 15-ounce gun, which is painful to shoot after less than a box of ammo. Most likely, she will go to the range once with it, and will learn how uncomfortable it can get during practice. After that, my bet is that she will avoid shooting it more than once a year, if that, for as long as she carries it.

    There are a lot of people like that, and not only women, who get these tiny, light guns in duty calibers, which are unpleasant to shoot for practice. Then going to the range becomes like going to the dentist.
    I don't blame the women. In just about every case I have seen it's been boyfriend, husband ( because they like it.) or some dealer trying to get crap off the self. Once they get fitted with something they like it's not a problem.
    Certified NRA Firearms Instructor
    Oklahoma SDA Instructor
    Utah CCW Instructor

  6. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by 3gunshooter View Post
    I don't blame the women. In just about every case I have seen it's been boyfriend, husband ( because they like it.) or some dealer trying to get crap off the self. Once they get fitted with something they like it's not a problem.
    I got lucky... my husband suggested my gun, and I LOVE it. I took a huge risk buying it because there weren't any in stores/at ranges for me to try, but if I didn't like shooting it I would have given it to him. It's a .357 Magnum revolver that shoots from the bottom cylinder, the Chiappa Rhino. It's a good weight, muzzle flip is very reduced (I'm quicker back on target with it than a 9mm Glock 26) and recoil is nearly imperceptable. I couldn't imagine shooting an airweight of the same caliber. I've seen a few men complain that their wife/mother/girlfriend won't practice with the gun even though they "love" it... Sorry guys, they don't... they are just being nice.
    Modern Whig
    "Government is not meant to burden Liberty but rather to secure it." -T.J. O'Hara

  7. #26
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    I don't get to live fire as often as I'd like, with my work, wife's school/work and my kids... along with the $$$, it's tough to get out when I want to. I do dry-fire practice with Snap-Caps though, I have some for nearly every caliber.
    Quote Originally Posted by Deanimator View Post
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  8. Thumbs up This!

    +1! A lot of revolver traditionalists talk down the Rhino, and call it all kinds of names in heated debates I've seen at some of these forums.

    I think it's a remarkable design, which brings the revolver into the 21st century. That low barrel concept was pioneered by the Russians for one of their competition pistols. It shot so great against the conventional guns that it was eventually banned by the International Shooting Union from their competitions:
    American Rifleman - MC-3: The First Upside Down Gun

    If I didn't already have a .357, too many guns, and if it were made in the US, I would have bought a Rhino.
    Quote Originally Posted by telpinaro View Post
    I got lucky... my husband suggested my gun, and I LOVE it. I took a huge risk buying it because there weren't any in stores/at ranges for me to try, but if I didn't like shooting it I would have given it to him. It's a .357 Magnum revolver that shoots from the bottom cylinder, the Chiappa Rhino. It's a good weight, muzzle flip is very reduced (I'm quicker back on target with it than a 9mm Glock 26) and recoil is nearly imperceptable. I couldn't imagine shooting an airweight of the same caliber. I've seen a few men complain that their wife/mother/girlfriend won't practice with the gun even though they "love" it... Sorry guys, they don't... they are just being nice.

  9. Exclamation great practice ammo

    I have bought practice ammo from Georgia Arms for 20+ years now, and can highly recommend it in any caliber.
    For the Rhino, the .357 you can get from them at ~45 cents a round, which is still a lot, but reasonable for great ammo:
    Georgia Arms - .357 MAG

    Of course, you can use .38 Special in that also, which would let you practice for ~26-27 cents a round, which is the same cost as a 9mm:
    Georgia Arms - .38 SPECIAL

    It's factory-reloaded, US-made ammo, with which I've never had any trouble over the years and thousands of rounds.

    Quote Originally Posted by telpinaro View Post
    Mine is expensive ammunition. However, I still do dry fire or some other form of practice (got a new holster, etc) after my son goes to bed.

  10. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by 7yFQQd View Post
    I have bought practice ammo from Georgia Arms for 20+ years now, and can highly recommend it in any caliber.
    For the Rhino, the .357 you can get from them at ~45 cents a round, which is still a lot, but reasonable for great ammo:
    Georgia Arms - .357 MAG

    Of course, you can use .38 Special in that also, which would let you practice for ~26-27 cents a round, which is the same cost as a 9mm:
    Georgia Arms - .38 SPECIAL

    It's factory-reloaded, US-made ammo, with which I've never had any trouble over the years and thousands of rounds.
    I'll have to check my warranty, but I think factory-reloaded will void it. Rhinos can be touchy, and I don't want to have to pay to repair it any time if I don't have to! I'll definitely save that, though, so I can use it when the warranty expires!
    Modern Whig
    "Government is not meant to burden Liberty but rather to secure it." -T.J. O'Hara

  11. practice ammo cost

    I guess, then the best you can get is ~38 cents a round:
    In Stock .38 Special Ammo Deals | Slickguns

    The .357 is really steep - looks like at least 75 cents a round for new ammo!

    Quote Originally Posted by telpinaro View Post
    I'll have to check my warranty, but I think factory-reloaded will void it. Rhinos can be touchy, and I don't want to have to pay to repair it any time if I don't have to! I'll definitely save that, though, so I can use it when the warranty expires!

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