Why people don't train.
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Thread: Why people don't train.

  1. #1

    Why people don't train.

    What's the reason people don't train? I know money is one of them. I know a lot of men that don't because of ego. What excuse have you heard?
    Certified NRA Firearms Instructor
    Oklahoma SDA Instructor
    Utah CCW Instructor

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  3. #2
    ego? I would think that could be a reason if a small amount of people, IMHO the 3 main reasons that people do not train is
    1. ignorance of the need to develop and maintain the skills necessary to be able to operate the weapon in the safest and most productive manner.
    2. economics, training is expensive, between tuition, ammo, and possibly travel expenses training can be very costly.
    3. time, many people just don't have a lot of time to devote hours training.

  4. #3
    Mine is expensive ammunition. However, I still do dry fire or some other form of practice (got a new holster, etc) after my son goes to bed.
    Modern Whig
    "Government is not meant to burden Liberty but rather to secure it." -T.J. O'Hara

  5. #4
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    I think most just equate having it to being prepared.

  6. #5
    I think it depends on what you mean by training. For the vast majority of non-military, non-LEOs, the primary defense strategy is to run away and break off an encounter if at all possible. I know that's mine. My EDC is a Ruger LCP, and the only reasonably conceivable circumstance for me to use it would be up-close and very personal, and then only when a loved one or I are directly threatened. If I'm in a restaurant or a store that is getting robbed, as long as the bad guy doesn't cover me or mine with his muzzle, he'll have to trouble from me. I'm just a guy with a desk job and a desire to protect myself. I go to the range every two weeks, shoot a hundred rounds or so, and I can hit any spot I want at 7 yards or closer. Is that training? If so, I train.

    On the other hand, for my purposes, I think off-hand shooting, running and shooting, room-clearing and hand-to-hand combat training are all fun, but it's just gun camp. Instead of a ski vacation, it's a gun vacation. That kind of training for most of us is the equivalent of going to a dude ranch to play cowboy for a while. It's not who I am, and it's not who I project to be. I don't believe in a zombie apocalypse, and I don't foresee a real-life RED DAWN scenario where my modest little arsenal will rescue the country from hoards of people trying to do it harm. I see no need to train for any kind of tactical situation.

    One thing I do know after a career in the fire and rescue service is that emergency situations have a way of locking up the mind. Some people panic and others take meaningful action. The difference is often defined by the level of relevant training. The way I see it, there's no real strategy in a gunfight beyond trying hard to be the one who walks away at the end of it. The key to that is marksmanship. If I can drill my attacker in the eye with my little .380 round before he can drill me in the gut with his .45, I win. If I don't, then I've had a bad day. Given that the average gunfight lasts something like three seconds, the winner is determined quickly and loser never knows he lost.

  7. I train to learn something new or, occasionally, as a refresher to reinforce what I've previously been taught and I what I feel I've gotten slack about doing right.

    I practice to perfect what I've been taught.

  8. #7
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    Why don't people eat healthier, exercise more or just plain take care of themselves better? Choices, we all have choices.
    "The smallest minority on earth is the individual. Those who deny individual rights cannot claim to be defenders of minorities." --author and philosopher Ayn Rand (1905-1982)

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by nathanwriter View Post
    I think it depends on what you mean by training. For the vast majority of non-military, non-LEOs, the primary defense strategy is to run away and break off an encounter if at all possible. I know that's mine. My EDC is a Ruger LCP, and the only reasonably conceivable circumstance for me to use it would be up-close and very personal, and then only when a loved one or I are directly threatened. If I'm in a restaurant or a store that is getting robbed, as long as the bad guy doesn't cover me or mine with his muzzle, he'll have to trouble from me. I'm just a guy with a desk job and a desire to protect myself. I go to the range every two weeks, shoot a hundred rounds or so, and I can hit any spot I want at 7 yards or closer. Is that training? If so, I train.

    On the other hand, for my purposes, I think off-hand shooting, running and shooting, room-clearing and hand-to-hand combat training are all fun, but it's just gun camp. Instead of a ski vacation, it's a gun vacation. That kind of training for most of us is the equivalent of going to a dude ranch to play cowboy for a while. It's not who I am, and it's not who I project to be. I don't believe in a zombie apocalypse, and I don't foresee a real-life RED DAWN scenario where my modest little arsenal will rescue the country from hoards of people trying to do it harm. I see no need to train for any kind of tactical situation.

    One thing I do know after a career in the fire and rescue service is that emergency situations have a way of locking up the mind. Some people panic and others take meaningful action. The difference is often defined by the level of relevant training. The way I see it, there's no real strategy in a gunfight beyond trying hard to be the one who walks away at the end of it. The key to that is marksmanship. If I can drill my attacker in the eye with my little .380 round before he can drill me in the gut with his .45, I win. If I don't, then I've had a bad day. Given that the average gunfight lasts something like three seconds, the winner is determined quickly and loser never knows he lost.
    Like it or not to those on this forum who find something or many things wrong with nathanwriter, he is honest and correct as far as I am concerned and, if you were to somehow have a way of asking this question to all "ordinary joes" out there who own that one firearm or two firearms, you will find, IMO, that they agree with his comments.
    I do not carry 24/7 or most days. I wholeheartedly believe in situational awarenes that has kept me safe for 71 years. Maybe I have led a blessed and upper middle class life but I also do not go anywhere that could cause me a problem and I will evade, run, hide--anything to avoid a problem. In my house I lock my bedroom door and will not leave it to investigate a bump in the night. I have insurance for everything and it all can be replaced--it is just stuff. I have insurance on myself but I am not replaceable and have no intention of finding out how good I am at this gun stuff. Try and open my locked bedroom door and it will probably will be the last thing you do. I target shoot in more of a real practice mode every two weeks with friends but I am not rolling around and laying on my belly and shooting from the hip etal, but I do practice point/shoot usually at targets that are within a 5-10 yards and not to the length of the range--the length of the range is not, IMO, imminent danger to me and serves me no purpose within what I consider my conservative lifestyle.
    Thank you nathan for saying something that I believe most people agree with.

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    New York
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    I know some people who dont train because they think they dont need to. For me, I just cant afford it. Ammo isnt always on the shelf to replenish for when I can. I wish I could go weekly, but like most people, time and finances dont allow it.

  11. #10
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    I try and train every couple of weeks if possible and depending on availability of ammo.

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