10 Drawbacks of gun ownership
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  1. #1

    10 Drawbacks of gun ownership

    10 Drawbacks of gun ownership
    By: Ben Marquis
    10 Drawbacks of gun ownership - Little Rock gun rights | Examiner.com
    Being a gun owner is a great thing. Most likely, you are a responsible and law-abiding member of society. You support the Constitution and the Bill of Rights, and vigorously defend the 2nd Amendment right to keep and bear arms. You enjoy shooting for sport and fun, and are not afraid to stand up and defend yourself and others. But being a gun owner is not all fun and games. There are some serious drawbacks that must be considered. Owning guns can be a money pit.
    Gun ownership can make you a social outcast. And depending on where you live, owning or carrying a gun can require you to jump through multiple flaming hoops, blindfolded, while balancing a speed loader on your nose. Despite the many drawbacks of gun ownership, we gun owners happily continue to own firearms. And we are growing in numbers.
    That means that more and more Americans have decided to forego the happy, simple, blissfully ignorant life of the rose-colored glasses anti-gun crowd and instead have determined to live a realistic life, to be armed to protect themselves and others. So, here are some reasons why it sucks to be a 2nd Amendment supporter, and all of the sacrifices that support entails.
    You can never have just one
    Owning a gun is just like any other collectible item. Once you get one, you can never stop thinking or talking about when you will get another one, where you will get it, what it will look like, how much it will cost, how you will show it off to your friends, and so on. Most gun owners own more than one gun. According to a Gallup poll in the mid 2000s, the average number of households containing guns was 40%, while the average number of guns per gun-owning house was 4.4. Even when non gun-owning homes are factored in, the rate is still 1.7 guns per home. Bear in mind that these numbers are probably low, as a significant number of gun owners donít respond to polls or tell complete strangers about their guns.
    The never-ending quest for ammo
    Ahhh, the never-ending quest for more and better ammunition. You need to spend time practicing at the range, so you get a few boxes of full metal jacket target rounds. You expend a couple boxes of those rounds in an afternoon, so you have to get more. Then you have to get some hollow-points or other personal defense loads for your daily carry piece and the one stashed in the nightstand. And that is just for your handguns. If you are like most gun owners, than this process is repeated for the .223 AR, the .30-06 or .308 hunting rifle, and the .22 rifle. Then of course there is the variety of 12 or 20-gauge ammo, birdshot for the trap range and buckshot or slug for home defense, for the shotgun in the closet. So you wake up early and get to the store as soon as the delivery truck comes in, because the ammo probably wonít be on the shelves long. Or you load up your wallet and mentally prepare to pay double to triple the normal price for your ammo at a gun show. But you really donít mind that much, do you?
    More accessories than Barbie
    Whether you own a handgun, rifle or shotgun, you want to accessorize it and customize it to your own personal preferences. The secondary market on gun accessories has exploded in recent years. For some major name-brand handguns and AR-15s, there are literally hundreds of different accessories. Flashlights, laser lights, sights, grips, stocks, magazines, extra ammo holders, barrels and triggers, slings and holsters. The list can go on and on. And the money pit grows deeper and deeper.
    Time on the range and the physiological effects
    It is a beautiful Saturday or Sunday. A friend has extra tickets to the game. Another friend invites you to go fishing. Your dad wants to go golfing. Perhaps your wife or girlfriend wants to go out for a picnic or have a barbeque. Maybe all those things sound nice to you, but thatís not what youíll be doing. Your Saturdays and Sundays are spent on the range, constantly practicing your shot, your stance, and your draw and reload time. Your social life looks like the target you just destroyed.
    There are also some physiological consequences of all that range time. First of all, your clothes and hands most likely smell of gunpowder. While Iím sure you love that aroma, and might even buy cologne that smells that way, non-gun owners may find the smell a bit off-putting. Your hands also have a permanent and perpetual slickness about them from all the gun oil. Secondly, despite the fact that you wear earplugs, or maybe even some really expensive and hi-tech noise-canceling headphones, you have probably suffered some hearing loss from all the gunfire. Did you hear that last part, or do I need to say that again louder?
    Cleaning night
    As just previously discussed, your weekends are spent on the range. So that means you can go out on Friday night with your friends or significant other, right? Wrong. Friday night is spent stripping and cleaning your guns in preparation for your range time. Ditto for Sunday nights as well. You just fired hundreds of rounds this weekend. You arenít seriously going to put your guns away dirty, are you? I didnít think so.
    Ballistics expert
    If the state crime lab is ever hiring, you could probably get a job. You know everything there is to know about the ballistics of your gun, probably even other peopleís guns as well. You can bore your friends and family to sleep by telling them exactly how many feet per second a particular bullet fires out of a particular gun. You can tell them exactly how many thousandths of a second will elapse from the time the bullet leaves the barrel until it hits the target. You can calculate windage in your head faster than someone can say ďwindageĒ. The scope on your rifle was dialed in by the second shot. You know that a shotgun slug has an arcing trajectory and can plot precisely where it will hit at any point up to 100 yards. Now if only that state crime lab would call, you could put all of this information to use.
    Amateur Paralegal
    You know the law. You have studied all of the particular codes in your state that pertain to firearms. You even know the laws in the surrounding states that you occasionally travel to. When someone asks about a specific law, you can quote the exact legal verbiage from the applicable codes, and you actually know what all that legalese means. You keep a close eye on impending gun legislation, and unlike our esteemed Senators and Representatives, you actually read the bills. You could probably even set some law enforcement officers and lawyers straight on exactly what certain laws mean.
    The government knows about you
    Guess what, you are on a government list. When that background check was run on you at the store, the ATF and FBI didnít dispose of your information like they said they would. Besides, even if they did, they can search your State Policeís database to find out about you, because when you got your concealed carry permit, into the database you went. You say you donít have a concealed carry permit, and you bought your guns privately, so they donít know about you? Maybe not, but if you have ever posted pictures of your guns on Facebook, or clicked ďlikeĒ on an article about guns (like this one), then the NSA knows about your interests, and that information has been stored away. No, you can step away from the window; they arenít coming to get youÖyet.
    You might be a racist terrorist
    Bet you didnít know that, did you. You consider yourself a patriotic American. You are a law-abiding, fine, upstanding citizen. But according to Janet Napolitano, former head of the Department of Homeland Security, you are a potential terrorist. You can join the ranks of other potentially evil villains such as returning military veterans, conservative and libertarian political activists, pro-life activists, and other outspoken religious groups. A bit discomforting to know, but at least you are in fine company.
    According to the same Gallup poll mentioned earlier, white people tend to have a higher rate of gun ownership than other ethnic groups. As such, the fine folks who make up the Southern Poverty Law Center have made the correlation that gun owners must be racist. You see, since most gun owners are white, and the SPLC views all whites as racist, than naturally all gun owners are racist, right? Of course, if you are a black, hispanic or asian gun owner, than this must mean that you are racist against yourself. Ahhh, donít you love liberal logic.
    Limited on where you can go
    If you are a gun owner that has a concealed carry permit, then you know that you, or at least your gun, are not welcome in some places. Obviously this varies from state to state, but in general there are a few places that you are not allowed to go while carrying. First and foremost are K-12 schools, as well as most colleges and universities. Federal buildings like courthouses and prisons are off-limits too. Airports are a big no-no. So are sporting events and National parks. Many states have rules restricting carrying in bars or restaurants that serve alcohol. While these rules can be disconcerting, and certainly limit where you are able to go while carrying, you can always vote with your wallet. If a private business chooses to remain gun-free, then they also choose to remain free of your money. And donít be afraid to let them know exactly why they wonít be getting your business either.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

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  3. #2
    Some other drawbacks
    Bad guys will not want to come visit you at night
    When bad guys are hanging out you won't be the first chosen for their nights fun and activities
    Liberals will make fun of you (of course the degree this one affects you will vary greatly with your ability to shake off BS).
    You won't be the party favorite at Wash DC bashes - unless the bad guys break in to do harm. Then you will find your popularity through the roof.
    Diane Feinstein won't invite you to her birthday party (I could care less if I biffed the spelling of her name).
    You have to remember to remove weapon before scuba diving.
    Typos are for the entertainment of the reader. Don't let it go to your head!

  4. #3
    The only drawback I can see is I'll never have enough money to buy all of the guns I want to buy.
    "Beware the fury of a patient man." --John Dryden,
    British poet, critic and playwright

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by nontechguy View Post
    The only drawback I can see is I'll never have enough money to buy all of the guns I want to buy.
    The way I'm going I won't have enough money to buy food...

  6. #5
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    I generally skim over your lists that you publish since they generally have errors. For some reason I read from the bottom up for this list. I take umbrage with this section
    Airports are a big no-no.
    How the heck do you check your firearms if you are traveling? Is it a big no-no only when you get to security? Is it a big no-no on the whole grounds of the airport? What would happen if you went to the luggage check-in counter and said you wanted to check your bag that has a firearm in it? Is that a no-no too.

    Here are other errors:
    #1 drawback... need to buy more, need to tell others... yet at the end of that paragraph he writes:
    Bear in mind that these numbers are probably low, as a significant number of gun owners donít respond to polls or tell complete strangers about their guns.
    Well which is it, do we need to talk about our guns, or do we not? He contradicts himself on the #1 drawback of his list.
    #2 drawback... buying ammo and the increased costs, then he writes
    Or you load up your wallet and mentally prepare to pay double to triple the normal price for your ammo at a gun show. But you really donít mind that much, do you?
    Yes, I do mind. Also, I find gun shows in my area have lower cost ammunition and that's what gets folks to come to the show. Also, I don't speak for everyone, but I purchase my ammo in bulk quantities on the Internet so I don't run out. Therefore, I'm not "always looking for ammo"
    #3 drawback... spending too much on accessories... alright, I do that. :)
    #4 drawback... I go to the range often, but I can honestly say, people are not offended because I smell like gun powder all the time and my hands aren't slick with gun oil. Really? Does this describe anyone you know?
    #5 drawback... Let me get this correctly, the author on Sunday night cleans his firearms from the weekend of shooting, and then does it again on Friday before he goes shooting? *shakes head and walks away muttering incoherently**
    #6 drawback... you are a ballistics expert. One, is this really a drawback. Two, how many people that you know carry firearms and don't know much about the ballistics of their ammo except for the caliber and the grain size? In fact, I knew people that thought the grain weight was the weight of the powder and not the bullet. So, frankly, is this truly a drawback for most firearms owners?
    #7 drawback... legal expert... If you aren't one, that is the true drawback in this country. I have learned more about my rights since carrying then I ever did before I carried. Tell me again how knowing the law is a drawback?
    #8 drawback... the government knows about you.... OK, yes, I agree the government does know about me and I'm probably on more lists than I care to know about. This is truly a drawback.
    #9 drawback... people make up untruths about me, such as "racist terrorist". If these same people are going to leave me alone because that's what they think of me, I consider that a blessing, since I do not wish to associate with those types of people. If however, it gets me on lists like the #8 drawback, then yes, this would be a draw back too.
    #10 drawback... I started my rant with this one.... it speaks of the places we "cannot" go. Airports and National Parks were listed as "big no-no's" Has this author looked anything up. States govern the lines of where you can go now and as such if you can carry within your state, you can carry in a National Park. What you cannot do is carry in the Federal Building in that park. This part, however, I do agree with the author
    If a private business chooses to remain gun-free, then they also choose to remain free of your money. And donít be afraid to let them know exactly why they wonít be getting your business either.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    I generally skim over your lists that you publish since they generally have errors. For some reason I read from the bottom up for this list. I take umbrage with this section

    How the heck do you check your firearms if you are traveling? Is it a big no-no only when you get to security? Is it a big no-no on the whole grounds of the airport? What would happen if you went to the luggage check-in counter and said you wanted to check your bag that has a firearm in it? Is that a no-no too.
    the author who wrote this made the commonly made error thinking that the law in the state he is familiar with is the law everywhere.
    while his state may prohibit guns on the property of an airport many other states have all sorts of different levels of laws governing carrying a weapon in airports.
    for example here in FLA you can carry your weapon anywhere on the airport property except inside the terminal and then there is the exception of weapons packed for transport which can be carried into the terminal, in addition private airports with out commercial service are not restricted.
    In other states you can bring your weapons anywhere in the airport except for the "sterile" areas subject to security screenings.

    the bottom line is that if you are going to compose a list like this or post a list like this you should be certain of it's accuracy, something that was lacking here.

  8. Quote Originally Posted by farsidefan1 View Post
    Diane Feinstein won't invite you to her birthday party (I could care less if I biffed the spelling of her name).
    If memory serves, she spells her first name Dianne. The extra "n" denotes "numbskull", or parroting others' crude description, "numbnuts".
    I'm a firm believer in two term limits for all politicians; one in office, the other in prison.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by r1derbike View Post
    If memory serves, she spells her first name Dianne. The extra "n" denotes "numbskull", or parroting others' crude description, "numbnuts".
    According to the link given by the OP, the author's name is Ben Marquis. If it was written by someone else and he published it, I didn't see a citation for anyone named Diane or Dianne.

    Quote Originally Posted by apvbguy View Post
    the author who wrote this made the commonly made error thinking that the law in the state he is familiar with is the law everywhere.
    while his state may prohibit guns on the property of an airport many other states have all sorts of different levels of laws governing carrying a weapon in airports.
    for example here in FLA you can carry your weapon anywhere on the airport property except inside the terminal and then there is the exception of weapons packed for transport which can be carried into the terminal, in addition private airports with out commercial service are not restricted.
    In other states you can bring your weapons anywhere in the airport except for the "sterile" areas subject to security screenings.

    the bottom line is that if you are going to compose a list like this or post a list like this you should be certain of it's accuracy, something that was lacking here.
    If indeed Ben Marquis is the author of this, he is from Arkansas. In Arkansas, one may carry anywhere in the airport, with the exception of the passenger terminal. And agreed, if you are going to write a list of drawbacks of ALL gun owners, the list should actually be drawbacks for ALL gun owners. This list, in my opinion, was one of the most shoddy lists written.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  10. #9
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    I realize that for the most part, the list is sarcastic in tone. In reality, there are no drawbacks to owning a firearm. Anyone who thinks so should find a knife or better yet, wait for the LEOs to investigate the felony that was perpetrated on him and, if he is lucky, it did not involve his demise.

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