Should It Be Obligatory to Notify LE That You Are Carrying Concealed With a Permit? - Page 2

View Poll Results: Should It Be Obligatory to Notify LE That You Are Carrying Concealed With a Permit?

Voters
87. You may not vote on this poll
  • The 39 states got it right,remain silent

    69 79.31%
  • The 10 states got it right,notify the LEO

    14 16.09%
  • Undecided

    4 4.60%
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Thread: Should It Be Obligatory to Notify LE That You Are Carrying Concealed With a Permit?

  1. In Minnesota it is not required.

    sent from a Samsung Galaxy S4

  2.   
  3. #12
    ABSOLUTELY NOT!!! YOU SHOULD NOT EVEN NEED A PERMIT TO EXERCISE A RIGHT!!! Do we need permits to exercise our right to free speech?

  4. Yea why not give a anti le a reason to harass you.

  5. #14
    I would not make it mandatory, but I do it because I carry my cell phone and wallet in a rig that looks like a shoulder holster. If it is not mandatory handing your permit with your license and registration without speaking would work too.
    Orlando, FL

  6. Quote Originally Posted by sdprof View Post
    Look at it this way. If the law was written that ANY person carrying a concealed weapon was required to notify LEO, then it would be unconstitutional. A felon, carrying a weapon, can not be compelled to incriminate himself.
    And that is a very good point. Most of the "must notify" laws, if not all of them, only apply to those people who are legally carrying a firearm with a permit, and the law does not even require those illegally carrying to notify!
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  7. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    353
    I had this discussion with an acquaintance of mine who is a state patrol officer. He brought up some very good points.

    1. He already approaches the vehicle/situation assuming that you have a firearm.

    2. All of the CCW carriers who have notified him (handed over DL with CCW permit underneath and stating that they're armed) have presented some sign that they're carrying (nervousness, hands clamped on steering wheel, etc.).

    3. He would rather know at the get go that someone is carrying, rather than find out at a time when things may be tense and have the situation needlessly deteriorate.

    4. He acknowledges that once you declare, it is up to the individual officer how the situation gets handled (leave it alone versus disarming the individual). He doesn't feel the need to and leaves it alone for "routine" stops.

    5. He reiterated the point that at the end of the day, it's in everyone's best interest to get home safely.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    2,072
    Definitely with the "NO" crowd...


    I used to be a government-educated stooge. By the grace of God, I repent. -Robert Burris

  9. #18
    Unless I'm suspected of a crime, I don't think anyone should be notified that I'm exercising my 2A rights. Unfortunately, I live in one of the "must notify" states.
    NRA Life Member
    NRA Certified Instructor (Pistol & Personal Defense in the Home)
    North Carolina Concealed Carry Instructor

  10. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by BUmmedic View Post
    I had this discussion with an acquaintance of mine who is a state patrol officer. He brought up some very good points.

    1. He already approaches the vehicle/situation assuming that you have a firearm.

    2. All of the CCW carriers who have notified him (handed over DL with CCW permit underneath and stating that they're armed) have presented some sign that they're carrying (nervousness, hands clamped on steering wheel, etc.).

    3. He would rather know at the get go that someone is carrying, rather than find out at a time when things may be tense and have the situation needlessly deteriorate.

    4. He acknowledges that once you declare, it is up to the individual officer how the situation gets handled (leave it alone versus disarming the individual). He doesn't feel the need to and leaves it alone for "routine" stops.

    5. He reiterated the point that at the end of the day, it's in everyone's best interest to get home safely.
    Disarming, unless a person is under suspicion of having committed a crime, is a clear 4th Amendment violation. Under no circumstances would I allow the LEO to take my firearm. I would demand that a supervisor be called and I would record the entire incident.
    NRA Life Member
    NRA Certified Instructor (Pistol & Personal Defense in the Home)
    North Carolina Concealed Carry Instructor

  11. Quote Originally Posted by BUmmedic View Post
    5. He reiterated the point that at the end of the day, it's in everyone's best interest to get home safely.
    How does my telling a police officer about my lawfully carried firearm which is safe and secure in it's holster and which I want to stay safe and secure in it's holster do anything more to ensure that everyone goes home safe at the end of the day?
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

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