Should It Be Obligatory to Notify LE That You Are Carrying Concealed With a Permit? - Page 3

View Poll Results: Should It Be Obligatory to Notify LE That You Are Carrying Concealed With a Permit?

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  • The 39 states got it right,remain silent

    69 79.31%
  • The 10 states got it right,notify the LEO

    14 16.09%
  • Undecided

    4 4.60%
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Thread: Should It Be Obligatory to Notify LE That You Are Carrying Concealed With a Permit?

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,556
    Unless it's the Law....... Don't ask, don't tell, seems to eliminate a lot of controversy and potential problems.
    Of course if you are asked to leave your vehicle or your situation with the LEO might cause your weapon to become visible I think some good judgement would be in order before the gun is exposed to the LEO. In that situation that would go a long way to limit controversy and problems!
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  3. True confession. I was driving along a road in Washington looking for a park where there was a reunion. My wife, stepdaughter and her friend were in the car. On a road I was not familiar with, the speed limit was 25. I was traveling over 40, not realizing what the speed limit was (fairly rural road). City police stops me. I am open carrying a stainless steel Taurus PT-145 in an open top holder (retention was around the trigger guard, no strap). I provide the officer with my driver's license, military ID card (required to validate my out of state driver's license), registration and insurance. Exchange pleasantries. Say nothing about my gun or my CPL.

    Officer goes back to his car, then comes back to my window and says, "Will you step out of the car for a minute please?" I was totally unprepared for that since it has never happened and I must have just looked at him with a dumb blank look. He said, "Come between our cars" and walked back behind mine, in front of his. Well, here I am with the loaded gun visible on my belt. I don't want to unload the gun and leave it in the car (for obvious reasons). It would have been illegal for me to leave the loaded gun in the car because nobody else had a CPL. Oh well, I exit the vehicle slowly, make sure to keep my hands in sight in front of me. And walk slowly back towards the officer.

    He said, "I didn't want to lecture you in front of your family, but you do need to slow down, this is a residential area. I'm just going to let you go with a warning." He gave me back my documents, I thanked him, that was it. No mention about the gun visible on my belt by either him or I.

    I used to speed quite a bit, I have since slowed down and pay attention to my speed now. I have been stopped at least 6 times while in possession of a firearm and never had a word said about it by either the officer or myself. I ran about 50% getting warnings vice tickets. I take all the precautions that I can to ensure the officer goes home safe at the end of the shift - I retrieve my driver's license and ID card from my wallet as soon as the lights come on, obtain the folder with my insurance and registration out of the glove box and put it on my lap. I turn on the hazard lights to let the officer know I see him and look for a safe place to pull over. I pull over in a parking lot or on a side street where there is less traffic. Turn the engine off. Roll down driver's window all the way. Right hand on steering wheel, left hand out window with driver's license clearly visible. Inside light turned on if at night. Exchange polite pleasantries with the officer when they approach. Telling them about my firearm and CPL adds absolutely nothing to their safety because the gun is not going to jump out the holster and shoot them or discharge and can only serve to needlessly complicate a simple traffic stop.
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  4. #23
    Here in NC we are required to notify the LEO in carrying concealed.

    I have always notified the officer of any gun in the car long before I carried concealed, like if I was going hunting and there was a rifle locked in the trunk. Before I had a CHP permit I would lock any handgun in the trunk (like driving to go fishing), and although I was never stopped while that was the situation, had I been stopped I would also have notified the LEO that I had an empty holster on my belt. I would rather not have anything surprise the LEO during any interaction.

    But this question was, should you be required to notify the LEO? I would say no, it should not be a legal requirement.
    Last edited by TrapperBob; 10-07-2013 at 11:57 AM. Reason: forgot a word - grammer

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    353
    While I agree with many of the posters here, lord knows I do, I don't wish to give anyone any reason to get me on the ground and cuff me. If they wish to disarm me, fine. Disarm me. If they acknowledge my rights and leave me alone, all the better. Hopefully the audio recording will be a saving grace. If we've learned anything recently, it's that there is no trust out there. Even in places you'd least expect, law-abiding citizens have been harassed for exercising their god-given rights.

    Same argument about confiscation. If the "fell off the boat" line (or something similar) doesn't work, then I'm not going to sacrifice my life or that of my family if someone in a position of authority (not matter how incredulous it may be) comes knocking on my door and asks for my firearms. I'm not going to take the stance of "from my cold dead hands." I've got a wife and children. What good would it do to get arrested, lose my job, injured, killed, etc? What would I/they have to show for it? What position would I have left them in?

    Sorry, but although I whole-heartedly believe in the rights, I'm also a realist. If it were just me, the story might be different.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    353
    Quote Originally Posted by TrapperBob View Post
    Here in NC we are required to notify the LEO in carrying concealed.

    I have always notified the officer of any gun in the car long before I carried concealed, like if I was going hunting and there was a rifle locked in the trunk. Before I had a CHP permit I would lock any handgun in the trunk (like driving to go fishing), and although I was never stopped while that was the situation, had I been stopped I would also have notified the LEO that I had an empty holster on my belt. I would rather not have anything surprise the LEO in during any interaction.

    But this question was, should you be required to notify the LEO? I would say no, it should not be a legal requirement.
    +1 I would notify, but do not feel it should be obligatory. To each his own. I can see how some people would be either more or less comfortable doing one or the other. I wouldn't want any surprises where someone else might construe it as hiding something.

  7. Quote Originally Posted by BUmmedic View Post
    While I agree with many of the posters here, lord knows I do, I don't wish to give anyone any reason to get me on the ground and cuff me.
    While reading the many different gun forums for many years, I have read many more posts regarding people who were treated badly by police officers after they informed them of their gun than I have of people who have experienced a bad reaction from a police officer "discovering" the firearm on their own. It seems that, statistically speaking, you have less chance of a negative encounter with a police officer by just keeping quiet about the gun. (When not required to by law, of course.)
    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Western Wisconsin
    Posts
    353
    I'll have to do more reading. I do live in a no obligation state. Perhaps the best policy is not to have to make a choice and not get pulled over in the first place.

  9. #28
    No to inform.i would love to see some statistics on if or how many people (legal or illegal carry) have attempted to shoot a officer once being descovered carrying.or is it normal for the crook to shoot as soon as the officer approaches.seems to me they either shoot immediatly or run and the gun is later discovered in pocket but no shot is fired by crook.or do I just watch cops too much?

  10. #29
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    2,837
    I'm with Blues... Nope! Don't need no stinkin permit and I won't admit ***** if asked.
    I plead the 5th!


    Sent from behind Enemy Lines.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    1,556
    Quote Originally Posted by BUmmedic View Post
    While I agree with many of the posters here, lord knows I do, I don't wish to give anyone any reason to get me on the ground and cuff me. If they wish to disarm me, fine. Disarm me. If they acknowledge my rights and leave me alone, all the better. Hopefully the audio recording will be a saving grace. If we've learned anything recently, it's that there is no trust out there. Even in places you'd least expect, law-abiding citizens have been harassed for exercising their god-given rights.

    Same argument about confiscation. If the "fell off the boat" line (or something similar) doesn't work, then I'm not going to sacrifice my life or that of my family if someone in a position of authority (not matter how incredulous it may be) comes knocking on my door and asks for my firearms. I'm not going to take the stance of "from my cold dead hands." I've got a wife and children. What good would it do to get arrested, lose my job, injured, killed, etc? What would I/they have to show for it? What position would I have left them in?

    Sorry, but although I whole-heartedly believe in the rights, I'm also a realist. If it were just me, the story might be different.
    I appreciate what being a realist is.
    I just wonder if this was to happen and everyone that was confronted was a "realist" also. I think I am a realist.

    I just think about this scenario. How long before....
    "Hello Mr. BUmedic. Remember me? I was here a few weeks ago with a couple of other members of the King's gun confiscation squad.
    I noticed you have a lovely family. Beautiful Wife and Daughter. I am here to take them with me and ask them a few questions.
    Don't worry though, unlike your guns I will bring them back day after tomorrow. I'll take good care of them. You don't mind do you?"
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