How often should you unload your concealed carry firearm magazine? - Page 2
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Thread: How often should you unload your concealed carry firearm magazine?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
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    3,832
    Quote Originally Posted by watchnut View Post
    I load and unload mine carry when I go to the range. I have had mags that have not been unloaded for years and they still work fine. But I also agree, keep a few extra springs on hand and change out if the mag gives any problems.

    At either the indoor or outdoor I use you cannot bring loaded weapons in. It is for safety that both ranges that they do that.
    You have to be kidding me? At your range, you are not allowed to carry a loaded weapon in? So before you go to the firing range, to shoot a loaded weapon, you must unload your weapon and disarm yourself first? I would not be spending any money at this range and I would be finding a new range immediately. At what point do they feel it is "safe" to be in possession of a loaded weapon?
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

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  3. #12
    After it is necessary to unload them.

  4. Unloaded action open unless rage is hot here... however this does not apply to carry weapons that will remain holstered unless needed.

  5. #14
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    N. Central Indiana
    Posts
    512
    I've referred to this article for many years, regarding this subject.

    American Handgunner
    May-June, 2003
    by John S. Layman

    (C/O American Handgunner Magazine)
    The shooting sports are full of some of the most knowledgeable and capable people you'll meet anywhere. I've been impressed consistently with the abilities of those I meet at the range to diagnose and fix a gun problem with as little as some spray lube and a cotton swab. However, sometimes a myth will creep into the folklore.

    The magazine spring myth has been around for many years and is growing in popularity. It goes something like this: "You should unload your magazines when they're not in use or the spring will weaken causing failures to feed."

    To put this one to rest, you have to understand creep. Creep is the slow flow of a non-ferric metal like copper, brass and lead under force. At temperatures outside of a furnace, steel doesn't have any appreciable creep. Under most conditions, steel flexes and then returns to its original shape. When pushed past its elastic limit, steel will bend and not return to its original shape. All designers of well-made magazines make sure the spring never approaches the elastic limit when the magazine is fully loaded. Honest. This means the spring will not weaken when the magazine is fully loaded -- not even over an extended time. Like 50 years. American Handgunner recently ran a story about a magazine full of .45 ACP that had been sitting since WWII and it ran just fine on the first try. So there you go.
    Only when our arms are sufficient, without doubt, can we be certain, without doubt, that they will never be employed....... John F. Kennedy
    Life Member NRA Life Member Marine Corps League

  6. Quote Originally Posted by opsspec1991 View Post
    How often should you unload your concealed carry firearm magazine?
    These questions seems to pop up a lot; How often should I empty my magazine? Should I alternate magazines? What happens to my springs?

    The truth is this; If you are running a modern firearm, keeping your magazines full will not hurt them in the long run. A well-manufactured spring in your magazine is designed to hold the load of rounds for long periods of time and should not weaken the spring to the point of being useless. Some manufacturers will say to alternate magazines x-amount of months, but it is our understanding that most do not even mention it in their literature.

    There are benefits to unloading your magazines, such as cleaning. If you carry the same magazine with the same rounds on a daily basis, dirt and debris will naturally start to build up. Every once in a while, it is recommended to unload and give everything a nice cleaning. This includes the rounds that are in the magazine. A quick wipe with a towel (make sure not to leave debris from the towel on any rounds) should do the trick.

    Another thing to keep in mind if you live in a warmer climate; Remember that your body sweats, and sweat can make its way into a magazine. While most modern manufactured ammo is extremely well put together, you always run the risk of moisture making its way into a round. We personally cycle through carry ammo every few months, especially during the summer, but that is completely up to you. It’s more of a ‘better safe than sorry’ mentality for us.

    So there you have it. After much research and personal experience, that is our two cents on the subject.

    Carry On.

    How often should you unload your concealed carry firearm magazine? : Concealed Nation | Promoting the importance of Responsible and Legal Concealed Carry in the US
    You stole this word for word from an article by Jason Hanson
    We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee, we don't take our trips on LSD. We don't burn our draft cards Down on Main Street. 'Cause we like livin' right and being free.

  7. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    You have to be kidding me? At your range, you are not allowed to carry a loaded weapon in? So before you go to the firing range, to shoot a loaded weapon, you must unload your weapon and disarm yourself first? I would not be spending any money at this range and I would be finding a new range immediately. At what point do they feel it is "safe" to be in possession of a loaded weapon?
    One of my local ranges is sort of like this too. Going in, all guns must be cased or holstered (no mention of loaded or not) but when the range is cold, and there are people down range, all guns must be unloaded and actions open on the bench, no holstered weapons. No mention is made of CC, but they will not allow you to OC a loaded or unloaded firearm when the range is cold. This is the same range that refuses to start an annual membership program and charges a $25 daily range fee. Needless to say, I don't use them except for company requals.

  8. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    South Carolina/Charleston
    Posts
    2,388
    I do not know how many "crazy" things any of you have seen at a gunshop or range but I have seen enough to understand most rules. Do not forget insurance--different ranges and shops are tied to specific insurance demands. My gunshop enforces only filling an empty mag at the range stall and not anywhere else--you are confined and facing the shooting area and nowhere else. I have also seen enough holes in the metal barriers between the stalls to scare the hell out of me. As far as a customer just coming in--it has to be insurance--as long as you are holstered does not make any sense, loaded/unloaded mags, but he owns the store yada yada yada

  9. #18
    For clarification on taking a loaded gun to the ranges I use. The state DNR says no loaded firearms can be brought to the line whether the range is hot or cold. I unload my carry in the parking lot and put in the factory case. I also unload all mags. When the range is cold, before you can go and check your targets, you must point all firearms downrange with the breech open. The range officer then walks the line to check. This outdoor range cost $4 all day!!! They have rifle up to 100 yards and shorter ones for handguns. 25+ stations.

    At the indoor range, which is a conservation club, they do not allow carry on site. I do not bring my carry loaded but in the unloaded in my range bag. Things are a little more loose at this range but it is better to safe 100% of the time and follow their rules. This indoor range cost $10/hour.

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