Compressed loads?
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Thread: Compressed loads?

  1. Compressed loads?

    I know .45's are really bad about doing this but if the fun can handle +P loads, is the pressure any greater than that? What problems can compressed loads cause?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    42
    Please explain your ??? In a little more detail....

  4. Ok if you chamber a single .45 round too many times, you'll notice the billet will start to compress back into he casing. This causes the round to be under higher pressure when it is fired, but I wasn't sure if the pressure was higher than that of a +P round or not. I'm also curious if it affects the trajectory of the bullet at all. Now we're taking close range, self defense trajectory, so of course it will be a affected at longer distances if the pressure is higher, but I'm wanting to know if there are any drastic effects straight out of the muzzle.

  5. #4
    I think the answer to this question is: "it depends". Compressing a bullet lower into the case can cause substantial pressure spikes but there are a lot of variables invoked such as how fast the powder burns, how deeply the bullet is seated, how tight the crimp is etc... In addition, some powders have allowable compression while others do not and the latter can cause massive pressure issues. Normally in the reloading world, we are only dealing with +\- 10% variabilities meaning that very small changes can make huge differences. A typical indicator is to examine the primer post-firing for symptoms of pressure spikes. Sometimes only a 1% change can make the difference between normal or over pressure.

    I know I've taken the long road to get to your question, but it was simply to prove the point that there aren't easy answers sometimes. Long story short - without chrono graphing the load, it's very challenging to know where on the pressure/velocity curve you are and how close you might be to being dangerous or safe.

  6. Quote Originally Posted by jblyth View Post
    I think the answer to this question is: "it depends". Compressing a bullet lower into the case can cause substantial pressure spikes but there are a lot of variables invoked such as how fast the powder burns, how deeply the bullet is seated, how tight the crimp is etc... In addition, some powders have allowable compression while others do not and the latter can cause massive pressure issues. Normally in the reloading world, we are only dealing with +\- 10% variabilities meaning that very small changes can make huge differences. A typical indicator is to examine the primer post-firing for symptoms of pressure spikes. Sometimes only a 1% change can make the difference between normal or over pressure.

    I know I've taken the long road to get to your question, but it was simply to prove the point that there aren't easy answers sometimes. Long story short - without chrono graphing the load, it's very challenging to know where on the pressure/velocity curve you are and how close you might be to being dangerous or safe.
    Thanks for the reply man. I think to be on the safe side I'll just throw those rounds out and get new ones. What I do now is if I pull a round out of he chamber, I exchange it with a random one in the magazine.

  7. #6
    THE REAL CAPTAIN JACK Guest
    I agree, but would also add that severe pressure from over compressed bullets can damage barrels and tend to cause the bullet to start to tumble from the over pressure coming out of short barrels of most pistols. Definitely not worth the risk!!!

    GUN CARRYING AMERICAN PATRIOT!!!!

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