Laser or night sights or both?
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Thread: Laser or night sights or both?

  1. Laser or night sights or both?

    I woud like some input here, I currently have night sights and have been thinking about adding a laser sight as well. Is it worth the expense? what do you recomend?

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  3. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2013
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    Indian Trail, NC
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    I say if you can afford it go for it! I have Night Sites on my home defense pistol and recently added a Viridian C series laser/light combo. It helps is something go bump in the middle of the night and my vision is still blurry from deep sleep!

  4. #3
    If you have night sights, having a flashlight attached is necessary. Otherwise, how will you identify your target? You can't assume you'll have access to a light switch (or electricity for that a matter). A laser performs the same function as night sights, just makes target acquisition a bit easier, so having both would be redundant (unless if the night sights are being used as a backup in case of laser failure).

  5. #4
    THE REAL CAPTAIN JACK Guest
    Viridian X5L best on the market. But I agree, when you get woke in the middle of the night it really helps to have the weapon mounted light. You will also be suprised how little you use the laser after the novelty wears off. I also swear by Meprolite night sights brightest ones of all that I own.

    GUN CARRYING AMERICAN PATRIOT!!!!

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by cjtpilot View Post
    I woud like some input here, I currently have night sights and have been thinking about adding a laser sight as well. Is it worth the expense? what do you recomend?
    If this is a home defense gun, you're better off with a rail mounted tac light with strobe.
    No statement should be believed because it is made by an authority.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    The Old North State
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    Not a fan of the strobe... it is all too easy to blind yourself with it IMO.
    d( -.- )b

  8. #7
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by cjtpilot View Post
    I woud like some input here, I currently have night sights and have been thinking about adding a laser sight as well. Is it worth the expense? what do you recomend?
    Keep the night sights and get a good hand sized flashlight with a button switch on the bottom of the flashlight so you can operate it with your thumb. A laser won't help if it is truly dark, but a flashlight turned on for a moment can give you a sight picture and you can turn it off immediately.

    I don't see the advantage of a laser for low or no light situations. However, a laser can be an effective tool in other respects.
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by s0nspark View Post
    Not a fan of the strobe... it is all too easy to blind yourself with it IMO.
    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    Keep the night sights and get a good hand sized flashlight with a button switch on the bottom of the flashlight so you can operate it with your thumb. A laser won't help if it is truly dark, but a flashlight turned on for a moment can give you a sight picture and you can turn it off immediately.

    I don't see the advantage of a laser for low or no light situations. However, a laser can be an effective tool in other respects.
    I'll simply note here that a rail mounted light with strobe is not only blinding and disorienting to the adversary, but has nearly no chance of blinding you, the operator, unless you muzzle yourself by looking down the barrel of your own gun while holding it. Now with a hand-held tac light, not only is it very easy to blind yourself if you drop the light, or turn the wrong way too quickly, but it also limits you to essentially a single-handed firearm grip, or a hand-and-a-half grip, neither of which will be as stable as a full two-handed grip. This is especially true for your follow-up shots if you have to take more than one shot to stop the threat.
    No statement should be believed because it is made by an authority.
    Robert A. Heinlein

  10. #9
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by wolf_fire View Post
    Keep the night sights and get a good hand sized flashlight with a button switch on the bottom of the flashlight so you can operate it with your thumb. A laser won't help if it is truly dark, but a flashlight turned on for a moment can give you a sight picture and you can turn it off immediately.

    I don't see the advantage of a laser for low or no light situations. However, a laser can be an effective tool in other respects.
    Quote Originally Posted by GlassWolf View Post
    I'll simply note here that a rail mounted light with strobe is not only blinding and disorienting to the adversary, but has nearly no chance of blinding you, the operator, unless you muzzle yourself by looking down the barrel of your own gun while holding it. Now with a hand-held tac light, not only is it very easy to blind yourself if you drop the light, or turn the wrong way too quickly, but it also limits you to essentially a single-handed firearm grip, or a hand-and-a-half grip, neither of which will be as stable as a full two-handed grip. This is especially true for your follow-up shots if you have to take more than one shot to stop the threat.
    And I will simply note, that if you get a flashlight that has a double switch button (one that you can depress and its on and let go and its off, or depress fully and its always on) is a flashlight that you can control so it will never blind you either.

    Also, you may want to learn several different flashlight carry methods. I tried different ones until I found one that I really enjoyed and had full control even with multiple follow up shots. Learning to control a flashlight allows you to orient the flashlight to where you wish it to be pointed. If you are required to point your flashlight AND your muzzle at the same thing (as with a rail-mounted), you may find yourself pointing at a family member with your gun. If you are able to steer the flashlight first and then turn the gun, you will never muzzle something (or worse someone) you do not wish to muzzle.

    Personally, I prefer the Harries hold, but here are several others for people to learn about: Handgun Flashlight Hold
    "Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well armed lamb contesting the vote."
    ~ Benjamin Franklin (maybe)

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    With a strobe, perhaps "blind" was a poor choice of words on my part (although that is how it feels when it happens...)

    What I should have said is that I find strobes to be very disorienting whether they are pointed at me or not. I'm sure this is a personal thing but I felt it was worth mentioning... If you plan on using any tool for self-defense you need to practice with it under realistic circumstances to determine if and how it will work for you.

    One other point - the only real advantages I've found with a laser are that, first, on my pocket pistol it is necessary for any precision because the sights are practically nonexistent and second it can be handy for placing shots when you are in a position that precludes sighted fire (around cover, for example). For normal shooting I think the laser can be a distraction.
    d( -.- )b

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