anybody reload their own buckshot?
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Thread: anybody reload their own buckshot?

  1. #1

    anybody reload their own buckshot?

    Ive been considering loading my own buckshot for some time now. i once used some of that 0000 buck that was hand loaded by that guy in new jersey of all places, kills on both ends let me tell ya. making a 100 yd shot with thay stuff is fairly routine. however its crimped poorly and loses it buffer fairly quickly not to mention its $3.75 a shot. Being able to perform a good crimp has been whats kept me from trying to this point. recently i ran into someone who loaded their own 3 1/2 in shells and did so using a roll crimp which looked like it was done in a factory. very professional looking. Ive found where to get all the stuff needed for doing the roll crimp and components for loading. just wanted to know if anyone has tried it so far and what kind of success you may have had and what were you loading. im thinking of trying 3 1/2 000

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  3. #2
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    How does one reload shotgun shells, anyway? Just asking because I'm wondering how the plastic ends would get pressed back down and sealed again.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  4. #3
    most of them are 6 crimp or 8 crimp and the reloading press takes care of crimping in the final 2 stages, its fairly simple for birdshot. i can crank out about 10 shells a min once i get everything set up

  5. #4
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    Seems like you would have to buy new shells, because the previously crimped material at the end is blown clean off. Or you could make long ones shorter.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  6. #5
    for what im planning to do i will have to purchase unfired non crimped primed shells from federal. $18 for 100

  7. #6
    I have done it a couple of times in the past just to do it.

    I have only done it in an old MEC. I used a conventional AA replacement wad cut down, with a paper disk on top, conventional crimp.

    They patterned well out to ~25 yards, and I would make them again if I was more active in defensive shotgun competition.

    I can't remember the brand of the buffer I used, but I found it at a local shop. I bought the buckshot off of Midway.

    I bet any forum discussing 3 gun competitions will have a thread or 2 about it. The downside will be that you may not be able to use a progressive press.

    If you decide to try it, let us know. I'd like to see it done well.

    -Matt

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    Question

    Quote Originally Posted by toreskha View Post
    Seems like you would have to buy new shells, because the previously crimped material at the end is blown clean off. Or you could make long ones shorter.
    Is making shotgun shells shorter a good idea? I'm not trying to be funny, just curious. I would think that any sort of modification to the length would drastically change the amount of powder that could be inserted, not to mention the size or weight of the wad to be used, and the integrity of the case to be properly crimped? As well, wouldn't the whole ensuing scenario be compromised? Or, am I missing something?

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdcleanfun View Post
    Is making shotgun shells shorter a good idea? I'm not trying to be funny, just curious. I would think that any sort of modification to the length would drastically change the amount of powder that could be inserted, not to mention the size or weight of the wad to be used, and the integrity of the case to be properly crimped? As well, wouldn't the whole ensuing scenario be compromised? Or, am I missing something?

    If you make the proper equipment adjustments, it shouldn't be a problem.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gdcleanfun View Post
    Is making shotgun shells shorter a good idea? I'm not trying to be funny, just curious. I would think that any sort of modification to the length would drastically change the amount of powder that could be inserted, not to mention the size or weight of the wad to be used, and the integrity of the case to be properly crimped? As well, wouldn't the whole ensuing scenario be compromised? Or, am I missing something?
    A 2 3/4 shell wouldn't take as much powder as a 3 1/2 shell, but shotgun shells of the same caliber usually differ only in the length. Otherwise it's pretty much the same thing. The case itself is mostly just plastic anyway, except for the base. As with any other reloading project, the amount of powder and shot would be something you'd have to figure in based on production models and personal preferences.

    I think it would be safe to re-use cases, as long as there's enough material to work with and you visually inspect them to make sure they're still structurally sound. If there's cracks or holes, then obviously throw them out.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by toreskha View Post
    Seems like you would have to buy new shells, because the previously crimped material at the end is blown clean off. Or you could make long ones shorter.
    That is not true. Whether a shotshell is roll crimped, or star crimped, the end is not blown off. In both cases, the crimp opens with the shot charge, and all of the contents come clean out of the hull.

    If you take notice, the ejection port on a pump or auto shotgun is significantly longer than a loaded shotshell. That is to allow the fired hull, with its crimp straightened, to eject.

    As far as making the shotshell shorter, it is probably not a problem, but your reloading equipment may not like it. Additionally, there are functional problems with ultra-short shotshells. Aguila offers mini shotshells (1 3/4" ?) for some reason. I have never tried them. Might be good for a competitive shooter trying to gain more capacity. I am not sure.

    I can reload either Winchester AA or Remington STS hulls 8 or 9 times before the crimps start to crack and get ugly. That is with lighter skeet loads. The more agressive your crimp, or the hotter the load, the fewer reloads you will get from your hulls.

    Good luck.

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