I think I'm on to something.
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Thread: I think I'm on to something.

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    I think I'm on to something.

    Over the years I've read stories about negligent discharges of holstered weapons, and on this forum and others we've concluded that it is virtually impossible for a weapon sitting in a holster to just discharge out of the blue. Lately, however, I have observed several people, primarily security guards (and a lady with whom I work), carrying their weapons in holsters that did not cover the trigger guard, leaving the trigger exposed. Isn't it conceivable that in the cases of "holstered" weapons discharging negligently, it was because the holster wasn't the right one for the weapon, and the person carrying probably leaned against something and caught the trigger on something?
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

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  3. #2
    It's certainly possible that an exposed trigger could catch on something, compress and discharge. however, that would be a poorly-chosen, not necessarily poorly-designed holster.

    I worried about this a couple of times since I carry at about the 5:00, over-the-kidney position and had a little twinge every time I pulled something out of my right hip pocket, especially if I was sitting in a chair or automobile.
    Reality, DEAL with IT!

  4. #3
    Join Date
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    1,437
    Quote Originally Posted by tattedupboy View Post
    Over the years I've read stories about negligent discharges of holstered weapons, and on this forum and others we've concluded that it is virtually impossible for a weapon sitting in a holster to just discharge out of the blue. Lately, however, I have observed several people, primarily security guards (and a lady with whom I work), carrying their weapons in holsters that did not cover the trigger guard, leaving the trigger exposed. Isn't it conceivable that in the cases of "holstered" weapons discharging negligently, it was because the holster wasn't the right one for the weapon, and the person carrying probably leaned against something and caught the trigger on something?
    A holster that doesn't cover the trigger guard seems as if it's asking for trouble. It would be relatively easy in a fight for an assailant to disengage the safety and pull the trigger while the weapon is still holstered.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  5. #4
    Seems like most of the better designed holsters today do cover the trigger. Of course the best safety device is still between our ears. Proper training including keeping the finger out of the trigger guard until ready to shoot can not be stressed to much.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  6. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by HK4U View Post
    Seems like most of the better designed holsters today do cover the trigger. Of course the best safety device is still between our ears. Proper training including keeping the finger out of the trigger guard until ready to shoot can not be stressed to much.
    You're right, but the key words here are "better designed." Most of the holsters I've seen that don't cover the trigger guard are the cheapo one size fits all nylon holsters, and a couple of leather ones.
    Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both.

    Benjamin Franklin

  7. I think I'm on to something

    I totally agree with you, tatted. When I selected my holster, the first criteria was that thetrigger guard was covered. That eliminated a lot of the holsters I saw, most of the 'nylon bag' type. I do have to say that proper training is another part of the equation. A buddy of mine has a scar on his leg where he went to holster his Glock, and got a furrow burned down part of his leg, as he obviously had his finger in the trigger guard when he tried to holster. I have done a little training, and the way I was taught , assume the student knows nothing about the subject and start from square one. That, with firearms is safety, which includes not letting hte finger get anywhere near the trigger until you are actually going to fire. I have to commend Hollywood, as they are finally getting it right. More and more, actors are carrying weapons correctly, their fingers alongside the slide and not on the trigger. How many accounts have you seen of a cop who accidentally shoots a subject because his finger was on the trigger of a weapon in single action mode, and someone sneezed or mad a sudden move? Bless you, tatted and HK4U. Always think safety with weapons and that begins with the holster.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
    I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money. You can keep THE CHANGE.
    An armed society is a polite society.

  8. Gee, ya think?
    Kel Tec Freak & 2A Activist
    Grass Roots Gun Rights SC

  9. #8
    Don’t forget, even with a holster that does cover the trigger it is still possible.

    A year or two ago there was a LEO who got the bottom cord of his jacket caught in the trigger guard as he holstered his Glock. All was fine until he got out of the car. As he was getting out he stretched and the cord pulled the trigger, firing the weapon.

    What would have prevented this? The LEO being aware of what he was doing when holstering his weapon would have prevented this, that is why it was classified as a ND and not an AD.

    I think it was Florida, but would not swear to it.

  10. #9
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    Redondo Beach, CA
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    A thumb safety, or a grip safety would have helped in that situation.

  11. #10
    gpbarth Guest
    I learned early on that you NEVER use a holster that does not cover the trigger guard. It is also a good idea to have a holster that "locks" the pistol in, so you cannot be disarmed easily or lose the weapon during a scuffle.

    And that's why I like my XD - no safety other than the grip AND trigger. If you are not hoilding the gun in a firing position, it ain't going off.

    Don't go "cheapo" on a holster, and know your gun's safety mechanisms very well.

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