A Confident Rifle
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Thread: A Confident Rifle

  1. #1

    A Confident Rifle

    A Confident Rifle
    .
    Change undermines confidence. With every change we make to our gear, we must then ask ourselves if the change was for the best… or if it is just another wrinkle in the brow. Every new rail, every new optic must be attached, torqued, and evaluated for its quality. New things that screw in place can come loose, your zero could change, your optic could fail. A man sleeps soundly at night when he (or she) has a confident companion at the bed side… one who doesn’t change and one who has yet to falter.
    .
    With all the new tools and gizmos we will receive this holiday season and those “must haves” that debut in the future, it is important to keep at least one rifle untouched by the urge to upgrade, to tweak, and to tinker. A rifle who’s zero is true and whose setup is solid need not be overhauled every time a new rail or new product comes out. A constant state of change to a rifle does neither the rifle or the rifleman a favor. The rifle that we value and grab in confidence should receive upgrades and changes only when necessary and even then those upgrades should not change the rifle as to shake your confidence in her.
    .
    With every barrel swap, every rail change, and every optic we introduce, we have just added variables which may rust, which may slip, or that may fail. That new barrel’s chamber may be a bit too tight, the fancy new rail may have hardware that can rust or shear, and that new and untested optic may fracture at the first drop.
    .
    Instead keep one rifle ready and in a state of confidence. Tinker with the others. Upgrade others with the latest gizmo. Perhaps once thoroughly vetted, the new gizmo can make its way to your ready rifle. Train with your ready rifle like your life depended on it. Ensure it eats the dust, spits through the mud, and keeps throwing brass like a sewing machine. Resist the urge to change it until absolutely necessary. A M16A2 is old, outdated, but if it is in a state of readiness… it is far more valuable than a rifle who has yet to travel with you through the dust, who has yet to eat thousands of rounds, and who’s optic still hasn’t yet fought against the slings and arrows of malfunctions or the slow grind of mother nature.
    .
    So hold steady. That heavy old girl who needs updating can hold off a bit longer so long as she sings. In the darkness the glass will shatter and footsteps rush in. In ten or twelve seconds it will be all over. You won’t remember the weight. You won’t remember the gritty trigger. You won’t wax poetic over the new gear you can’t afford and don’t have. You will only remember that you grabbed that rifle because you were confident in her… and that she breathed fire like the devil.
    .
    Read More:
    .
    A Confident Rifle
    .
    My Thoughts:
    .
    Sometimes putting all the latest gadgets on you gun isn’t what is needed.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

  2.   
  3. A Confident Rifle -- I have two
    An old Marlin Texan 30/30 , only change is a receiver sight because of my old eyes.
    Old Ruger lite weight M77 .308 with a Redfield 2 3/4 that has a post instead of crosshairs

  4. #3
    I'm a simple guy. Only a couple accessories needed for a rifle....

    Anyone who says, "I support the 2nd amendment, BUT"... doesn't. Element of Surprise: a mythical element that many believe has the same affect upon criminals that Kryptonite has upon Superman.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by NavyLCDR View Post
    I'm a simple guy. Only a couple accessories needed for a rifle....

    An open backyard and a clean scope. Good accessory choices :)

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    North Western Oregon
    Posts
    142
    I have a couple of "Ready Rifles" and some in the Tinkering category. I do not have a good place to shoot or train locally with rifles. But I have gone to three four day courses, using a different rifle for each one. I am not concerned with much hard use as my age and physical condition will give out long before any of my ready rifles will. The original post is good advise for those who can follow it. I have only one with a reflex sight, both rifle and the sight are untested right now and will be until spring. Would I trust it? Sure I believe it can safely and reliably fire, the rifle was made from quality components, and I have torqued and after a couple of weeks, re-torqued all the threaded items. My castle nut is un-staked, but that is my choice. It has a Leopold Delta Point Pro that has not been zeroed, come Spring I intend to rectify that problem and shoot the whole combo for testing reliability. Reliability is all important. Accuracy matters little if the gun is unreliable.

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Houston, Republic of Texas
    Posts
    199
    Is there a rifle in that picture?

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast