Why Hollow Point Ammunition is the Safer Choice
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Thread: Why Hollow Point Ammunition is the Safer Choice

  1. #1

    Why Hollow Point Ammunition is the Safer Choice

    Why Hollow Point Ammunition is the Safer Choice
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    by Drew Beatty
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    Hollow point ammunition is often vilified by politicians and the media. Many of you are likely old enough to remember the attacks on Winchester Black Talon hollow point ammunition in the 1990s, which was designed with law enforcement needs in mind. News reports suggested that we should all be very afraid of this ammunition, as if the manufacturers were horrible mad scientists obsessed with killing and causing bodily damage.
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    Medical personnel were concerned that the jagged edges of the expanded bullets would puncture gloves during removal, though no incidents were ever reported. Eventually there was a lawsuit against the ammunition manufacturer after the ammunition was used in a murder spree in a 1993 Long Island railroad shooting. Winchester finally pulled the ammunition off the market.
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    The truth is, hollow point ammunition is a safer choice for ammunition used in civilian self-defense firearms. This is why law enforcement organizations throughout the nation use it, and this is why it is a good choice for concealed carriers to consider. Hollow point ammunition is actually safer than ball ammunition in a defensive situation.
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    Critics claim that hollow point ammunition expands upon impact, becoming in some cases twice the diameter of the unfired bullet. This is often characterized as a sinister result, but it is actually an important safety feature for someone defending them self against a threat in a public environment.
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    This characteristic greatly reduces the risk of over-penetration, where a bullet may go completely through an intended target and maim or kill innocent bystanders. Ball ammunition can over-penetrate targets in defensive situations because the bullet is less likely to deform into a "mushroom" shape, and will naturally encounter less resistance as it passes through a target.
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    Ball ammunition works to a soldier's advantage on a battlefield, as one shot carries the potential of injuring or killing more than one opposing soldier. In civilian use, this is a tragedy waiting to happen.
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    The expanding design of hollow point ammunition also creates a larger wound channel in a human or animal attacker, which increases the severity of an injury, potentially making a violent attack end more quickly. This is clearly an advantage in a defensive situation, where stopping the threat is the goal. A larger, more catastrophic wound per round fired can also lead to fewer rounds being used overall to stop attack — a clear safety advantage. Fewer rounds fired means fewer potential misses and less potential for innocents to be injured.
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    point bullets, because of their design, are also less likely than ball ammunition to ricochet off of hard objects and strike innocent bystanders. Ball ammunition has a greater potential to retain much of its shape and weight after striking hard objects. The expanding design of the hollow point bullet is more likely flatten out and decrease in velocity more quickly if it strikes a hard object.
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    Hollow point bullets are a responsible choice for use in a civilian defensive firearm. Modern ammunition manufacturers offer a tremendous variety of defensive ammunition to suit the needs of any customer. Whatever defensive ammunition you choose, it is important that you adequately function check it for reliability in your defensive weapon to ensure it functions flawlessly.
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    Read More: Hollow Point Ammunition | Second Call Defense
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    My Thoughts:
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    You hear gun owners say ball ammo is satisfactory for a defense round, hopefully this will convince them why ball ammo isn’t the way to go.
    The only easy day was yesterday
    Dedicated to my brother in law who died
    doing what he loved being a Navy SEAL

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  3. #2
    The other good reason normally given for using JHP's is that with it a 9x19 expands as well as 45ACP does, and therefore this gives more knockdown power to the 9x19 than it would otherwise have compared with big brother 45ACP.

    I am thinking that the knockdown issue is the more relevant, but with the collateral damage issue being subsequently relevant secondarily too.

  4. Quote Originally Posted by HKS View Post
    The other good reason normally given for using JHP's is that with it a 9x19 expands as well as 45ACP does, and therefore this gives more knockdown power to the 9x19 than it would otherwise have compared with big brother 45ACP.

    I am thinking that the knockdown issue is the more relevant, but with the collateral damage issue being subsequently relevant secondarily too.
    In my experience they expand much more than a 45. I tried Winchester silver tips+P once in wet phone books and they expanded not at all while 38 silver tips went to 1/2" and tore a much bigger channel. That was proof enough for me.


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  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by driz View Post
    In my experience they expand much more than a 45. I tried Winchester silver tips+P once in wet phone books and they expanded not at all while 38 silver tips went to 1/2" and tore a much bigger channel. That was proof enough for me.


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    Not for me I use JHP with 45's too.

  6. #5
    When a bad guy is shot with a round nose bullet it more than likely will go through him and not be a kill shot. Which means they can still be able to shoot you. In most all states you are responsible for you bullets and a through shot can also hit a bystander, and it's your ass then.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by SR9 View Post
    When a bad guy is shot with a round nose bullet it more than likely will go through him and not be a kill shot. Which means they can still be able to shoot you. In most all states you are responsible for you bullets and a through shot can also hit a bystander, and it's your ass then.
    With a mouse gun like a 380 or a 22LR that is probably right.

    Trayvon Martin was shot through the heart with Zimmerman's 9x19 and even he still lived long enough (about 15 seconds) to holler back at Zimmerman.

    The expanding 9x19's or 45ACPs do more damage going through. But their main advantage is less collateral damage when the bullet fragments keep going and hit someone else nearby -- the collateral damage.

    Unless you hit the brain, the target is not going down immediately.

    And even if you hit the heart, he/she will still have about 15 seconds to shoot back at you. FBI agents are taught to make this 15 seconds count. Most others are not though.

    Most bullet impacts are not brain or heart shots however.

    That's why it is a good idea to keep shooting with several rounds like when Darren Wilson shot Michael Brown 11 times.

    Personally I think 11 times is excessive though. Five should be plenty.

  8. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by driz View Post
    In my experience they expand much more than a 45. I tried Winchester silver tips+P once in wet phone books and they expanded not at all while 38 silver tips went to 1/2" and tore a much bigger channel. That was proof enough for me.


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    There are slow loads and fast loads.

    I use slower loads in my 45ACP.

  9. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by SR9 View Post
    When a bad guy is shot with a round nose bullet it more than likely will go through him and not be a kill shot. Which means they can still be able to shoot you. In most all states you are responsible for you bullets and a through shot can also hit a bystander, and it's your ass then.
    Handgun bullet construction has nothing to do with "kill shots". That's a shot placement issue.

    Handgun bullet construction can limit overpenetration. If an expanded JHP bullet exits the body at all, it will be at slow speed with less lethality for an innocent bystander than a round nose FMJ bullet. If a JHP bullet doesn't expand, it will behave like a round nose FMJ bullet. Flat nose FMJ bullets have the tendency to tumble at certain speeds, limiting overpenetration as well.

    You are responsible for all of your bullets in all states. That's why you still need to obey rule #4.

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