Guns in Reality vs. Hollywood and Fiction
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Guns in Reality vs. Hollywood and Fiction

  1. #1

    Guns in Reality vs. Hollywood and Fiction

    A student who recently completed a CCW and Basic Pistol course sent me this article - thought I'd find it interesting. (He was right.)

    While it's nothing 'earth shaking' in its revelation, as a new shooter he sees this as validation or verification of many handgun safety and function points covered in class.

    Obviously, many movie makers and novelist just don't know how silly they can sometimes look.

    gun mistakes

    Some of the graphics and illustrations are kinda cool too, in a Frank Miller sort of way.
    "There is no consitutional right to be protected by the state against being murdered by criminals or madmen." (7th Cir. 1982, Bowers v. DeVito)Stay safe, and stay trained.www.sazsatt.com

  2.   
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Southern New Hampshire
    Posts
    553
    Come on now.....you don't think these movie/tv makers are going to "fix" all these prop thingies do You? That is just like saying.......did you ever notice how perfect the girls hair is when she wakes up in bed OR how her and the spouse are getting it on without going to the bathroom first to take a leak or even brush their teeth! I know I gotta go first thing in the morning when I awake. Plus I don't even want to smell my own breath let alone my Wifes.
    Here's one for ya.......
    "It's A Wonderful Life" with Jimmy Stewart, at the end when he leaves the club and the cop (I think his name is Charlie??) confronts Stewart. Stewart throws a jab at the cop who goes down and Stewart runs off. The cop gets up and pulls out his 38 and starts firing all the rounds from his gun pointing the down the street. Keep in mind it's dark out, people are standingwell there are street lights on, it's xmas eve, snowing, there are shoppers everywhere and this is on Main St.! Pretty crazy eh?!
    I know what You mean though, I guess only a percentage of people notice these things in movies especially when it comes to weapons.
    (All the above are MY opinions/suggestions ONLY....AND, I like to bust ball's, it's called having a sense of humor. In other words, no intent to offend anyone, so get over it)

  4. Guns in reality

    One of my pet peeves is the mystery paperback where the hero picks up his Smith & Wesson Model 10 revolver and checks the safety catch. AAAARRRGGHHHH!!!! I guarantee you, the book goes right into the nearest trash can. Apparently writers were asleep in writing school when the teacher told them the little doodad on the side of a revolver is a cylinder release, not a safety of any kind.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
    I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money. You can keep THE CHANGE.
    An armed society is a polite society.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Battle Creek Mi
    Posts
    1,853
    I use to enjoy how a guy with a muzzle loader could fire multiple shots with out reloading, or how a pistol could fire 14+ rounds before reloading.

    But he makes a few errors in his gripe, not all semi autos lock back after the last round, and if dirty the lock back can fail.

    Not sure of the exact time here but black powder was abandoned in favor of Cordite around WWI, was the propellant used in larger shells (except Navy's 14 and 16 inch guns), tended to be pellets or a single solid mass, was very tar like, very stable i.e. not vibration sensitive, and watter proof. "Cordite thick as fog" would have been a battle field slang from the artillery or mortars heavy use. Unique or some similar powder would very likely been the propellant in early military pistols and riffles, and is nitrate based, so depends on the context the quote was used in, it could be accurate. Not sure just what is used today.

    Fun time... the nitrate smoke was so thick from the machine Gun fire at Knob Creek last October they had to shut the range down to let the air clear. At one point you could not see 1/4 way down range, N this happened multiple times cool huh!!!
    Last edited by Sheldon; 01-22-2009 at 11:53 AM.

  6. #5
    One of my favorites has always been the silencer on a revolver. Also I think I shared this before on another thread but once on CSI after a shooting in a car they picked up the brass and one of the officers looks at it and says "it is a 357 Glock" round. Last time I checked they were called 357 Sig's. Later they found the gun and sure enough it was a Glock Perhaps they just called them 357 Glocks because they could tell just by looking at the cases they were fired from a Glock LOL. Another that you will see a lot in older movies is someone shooting a rifle and the action does not move and no recoil.
    By faith Noah,being warned of God of things not seen as yet, moved with fear,prepared an ark to the saving of his house;by the which he condemned the world,and became heir of the righteousness which is by faith Heb.11:7

  7. #6
    'Raising Arizona' - when the police respond to the armed robbery of the mini-mart.... now THAT's hilarious!

    Firing revolvers all over, at everything, never reloading.... but it's intended to be funny. I love that movie.

    For "ballistic realism" I like Band of Brothers, or HEAT (great cops & robbers flick).
    "There is no consitutional right to be protected by the state against being murdered by criminals or madmen." (7th Cir. 1982, Bowers v. DeVito)Stay safe, and stay trained.www.sazsatt.com

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    I always get a kick out of cars that explode after being hit by a few handgun rounds. I must be buying my ammo from the wrong place.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by HK4U View Post
    One of my favorites has always been the silencer on a revolver. Also I think I shared this before on another thread but once on CSI after a shooting in a car they picked up the brass and one of the officers looks at it and says "it is a 357 Glock" round. Last time I checked they were called 357 Sig's. Later they found the gun and sure enough it was a Glock Perhaps they just called them 357 Glocks because they could tell just by looking at the cases they were fired from a Glock LOL. Another that you will see a lot in older movies is someone shooting a rifle and the action does not move and no recoil.
    Actually, working in the inner city, we'd always get calls about armed BG's... and regardless of what they were actually using or carrying - if it was a hadgun, it was a "Glock." If it was a long-gun, it was an "AK." Didn't matter if it was a revolver, or a Marlin .22... the denizens of the inner city knew "Glocks" and "AK's"...
    "There is no consitutional right to be protected by the state against being murdered by criminals or madmen." (7th Cir. 1982, Bowers v. DeVito)Stay safe, and stay trained.www.sazsatt.com

  10. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Twin Falls, Idaho
    Posts
    292
    Quote Originally Posted by HK4U View Post
    One of my favorites has always been the silencer on a revolver. Also I think I shared this before on another thread but once on CSI after a shooting in a car they picked up the brass and one of the officers looks at it and says "it is a 357 Glock" round. Last time I checked they were called 357 Sig's. Later they found the gun and sure enough it was a Glock Perhaps they just called them 357 Glocks because they could tell just by looking at the cases they were fired from a Glock LOL. Another that you will see a lot in older movies is someone shooting a rifle and the action does not move and no recoil.
    You're right HK about the 357 Sig. They probably asumed it came from a Glock due to the popularity of Glocks. However any case can easily be traced to a Glock by the unique primer indentation made by the chisel firing pin of a Glock.

  11. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Honolulu, HI & Salt Lake City, UT
    Posts
    2,797
    Quote Originally Posted by astute View Post
    You're right HK about the 357 Sig. They probably asumed it came from a Glock due to the popularity of Glocks. However any case can easily be traced to a Glock by the unique primer indentation made by the chisel firing pin of a Glock.
    This would be true many years ago when Glock was the only striker filed pistol. Now that there are other models out there, it's very difficult to narrow a case down to have been fired from a Glock.



    gf
    "A few well placed shots with a .22LR is a lot better than a bunch of solid misses with a .44 mag!" Glock Armorer, NRA Chief RSO, Pistol, Rifle, Shotgun, Muzzleloading Rifle, Muzzleloading Shotgun, and Home Firearm Safety Training Counselor

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast