Detection and prevention of mis-fires
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: Detection and prevention of mis-fires

  1. Question Detection and prevention of mis-fires

    I've fired many different rifles and a few types of revolvers before but never any type of semi-auto handgun. I've experienced many jams with my M1Carbine which were easily cleared but a little bit more concerning was was the two times that I pulled the trigger of a loaded weapon and nothing happened. Once with a 357 magnum revolver and once with a 30-06.

    (I just bought a semi-auto .380ACP)

    My main question is how can I know that a pistol (or rifle) that I have never fired before is safe? Also, what are the chances of a round actually exploding in the chamber, what can cause that, and how is it prevented?

    I know this probably a paranoid question but I'd rather get some input on the matter since I don't know.

  2.   
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kalifornia & Idaho
    Posts
    1,052
    Quote Originally Posted by hermit855 View Post
    I've fired many different rifles and a few types of revolvers before but never any type of semi-auto handgun. I've experienced many jams with my M1Carbine which were easily cleared but a little bit more concerning was was the two times that I pulled the trigger of a loaded weapon and nothing happened. Once with a 357 magnum revolver and once with a 30-06.

    (I just bought a semi-auto .380ACP)

    My main question is how can I know that a pistol (or rifle) that I have never fired before is safe? Also, what are the chances of a round actually exploding in the chamber, what can cause that, and how is it prevented?

    I know this probably a paranoid question but I'd rather get some input on the matter since I don't know.
    If you have any doubts have a competent gunsmith check it out for you. If it's new, read the manual, and/or have an instuctor go over the gun and firing procedure with you explaining how it works and doing some practice dry firing.
    Maybejim

    Life Member NRA
    Life Member CRPA
    Life Member SASS

    What you say isn't as important as what the other person hears

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    1,437
    Pulling the trigger and having nothing happen could have lots of causes. The trigger assembly or firing pin may be defective. The round may have a hard primer, or it may be a dud with no load. Maybe you have no rounds in the magazine. If you have a barrel or chamber obstruction and fire a round, then you've got something to worry about, but you'll find out about it immediately.
    Silent Running, by Mike and the Mechanics

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Eugene, Oregon
    Posts
    637
    The chances of a round exploding in the chamber are very slim. If you are using good ammo in a good gun, you shouldn't worry. If for some reason you doubt the reliability of the firearm, you should take it to someone who knows what they're doing.

    The biggest issue you could face with a firearm exploding is getting a squib, or too hot of a load. If you are using factory ammunition, there is no need to worry about it. A handload that is too hot (too much powder) can cause the barrel to explode.
    A squib is when the bullet fails to exit the barrel, which the next round behind it...well, you can guess what happens next. This is a pretty rare occurance, usually when firing reloads, or an improperly functioning gun. Of course, always use the right kind of ammo, you don't want to try firing 9mm ammo out of a .45, or anything like that.

    Be safe, and happy shooting.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]In order to rally people, governments need enemies. They want us to be afraid, to hate, so we will rally behind them. And if they don't have a real enemy, they'll invent one in order to mobilize us.

  6. Detection and Prevention of misfires

    You got some good advice. Find a competent gunsmith and establish a good working realtionship with him. He can examine your firearm and let you know if it is up to snuff, and if it isn't, usually he can make it so (tip of the hat to Captain Picard.) Buy good ammunition, and clean and maintain your weapon on a regular basis. If necessary, take your cleaning kit to the gunsmith and have him teach you to properly clean your weapon. If you do these things, you will reduce the chance of a misfire by almost 100%. If you do have a misfire, keep the weapon pointed downrange for thirty seconds, in case the round is cooking off. After that time period, carefully clear the weapon and dispose of the offending round. Do not be overly paranoid about misfires. In all the years I have shot, either for qualification or in competition, I have only had one misfire. I the same period of time I have had four problems with ammo. One was a squib load which made me disassemble my Dan Wesson Arms revolver and use a dowel rod to drive the wadcutter out of the barrel. Our department at one time issued Silvertip hollowpoints, and I discovered a light round. It turned out that there was no lead in the aluminum shell. The armorer said if I had fired it, it would have been the fastest .45 ACP in history, but that it probably would not severely injure anyone. Remember, the loudest noise in the world is a click when you expect a bang, and the second loudest is a bang when you expect a click. Best of luck, I think you will enjoy the semiauto pistol.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
    I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money. You can keep THE CHANGE.
    An armed society is a polite society.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Quantcast