If stopped while driving...stupid Q time.
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Thread: If stopped while driving...stupid Q time.

  1. If stopped while driving...stupid Q time.

    If this has been answered many times, pelase lead me in the right direction. I like to be ready, and wondered what the proper second step is if I ever encounter a LEO while in posession. Per instructiion at my CCW class, I was tole to advice the LEO that I have a CPL and am in posession. If the LEO askes for my firearm, how should I had it over? Should I had it to him like I would anyone else? Meaning, remove the mag and verify nothing in the chamber? or would that cause problems? should I tell the LEO that I am about to remove th mag so he/she does not get nervous?

    I may be over thinking this, but i don't want to do soemthing stupid.

    thanks for your help.

  2.   
  3. Quote Originally Posted by joesmo View Post
    If this has been answered many times, pelase lead me in the right direction. I like to be ready, and wondered what the proper second step is if I ever encounter a LEO while in posession. Per instructiion at my CCW class, I was tole to advice the LEO that I have a CPL and am in posession. If the LEO askes for my firearm, how should I had it over? Should I had it to him like I would anyone else? Meaning, remove the mag and verify nothing in the chamber? or would that cause problems? should I tell the LEO that I am about to remove th mag so he/she does not get nervous?

    I may be over thinking this, but i don't want to do soemthing stupid.

    thanks for your help.

    My response would be to request the officer put me in cuffs and remove it himself. Be polite and respectful, but do not go for your weapon around a LEO. How is it oging to look on video? How is it going to look to the rookie backup arriving on scene. Nothing good can come from grabbing a gun in the presence of a LEO.

    Just my opinion.

  4. Stupid Q time

    It is never a good idea to be manipulating a firearm in the presence of an LEO. In Washington state, there is no requirement to inform an officer you are carrying with a license. It is recommended as a courtesy, but is not a legal requirement, as it was in Arizona. Each officer is different in how he wishes to handle the matter. Keep your mouth closed and listen to how he wants to proceed. Some officers will never even ask where the firearm is, he will just tell you to keep your hands in plain sight and not make any sudden moves. Some will ask where the weapon is, andhe or she will retrieve it, after cautioning you to remain perfeclty still. A very few will ask you to hand it to them slowly, grip first. If I am stopped, I will advise the officer Ihave a pistol license and a pistol, and ask how he wants to proceed. If he or she wants to retrieve the pistol themselves, I will advise them I have an active retention device and explain how it works. Chances are, they will decide to have me hand it to them slowly, very slowly. I will not do anything which he or she might interpret as a threat to their safety. Both of us want to get home to our families, and we both understand how things work.
    A man without a gun is a subject; a man with a gun is a citizen.
    I'll keep my freedom, my guns and my money. You can keep THE CHANGE.
    An armed society is a polite society.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Tampa Bay Area
    Posts
    1,854
    Best thing to do is say something like this: "Sir I have a valid concealed weapons permit and I do have the pistol on me. What would you like me to do?"

    Then just move slowly and follow his directions.

    Hope that helps.
    "When Government fears the people, it's liberty. When people fear the Government, it's tyranny."
    - Benjamin Franklin

  6. #5
    This is how I handled it (at 11:30 pm) for speeding. I had my gun in the glovebox, but I would not have done anything different if it was on my hip in it's holster:

    Once stopped on the side of the road, I immediately retrieved my military ID and driver's license from my wallet and placed my wallet in my lap. Then I opened the glove box and retrieved the folder that contains my registration and insurance card and closed the glove box, leaving the gun there. I placed the folder on my lap. I rolled down my window all the way, placed my left hand with my drivers license and ID card outside the window and right hand plainly visible either on the folder on my lap or on the steering wheel.

    Officer takes my ID card and license. Asks me for registration and insurance, which I retrieve, again in plain sight, from the folder on my lap. He goes and does his thing and comes back cuts me a break on the ticket. I do not open the glovebox to return the folder until he is back at his car.

    When I would have chosen to inform him of my firearm would be if I had to reach near it to retrieve something in his presence, in this case, the glove box, or if the gun on my hip, if I had to get my wallet in his presence. Then, before making that action, I would have informed him of my gun and CPL and asked for his desires. OR if he asked me to exit the vehicle, while wearing my gun, at that point I would have informed him.

    This was in Washington state where notification is not required.

    If he asked me to retrieve my gun and hand it to him, I would not manipulate the firearm in any way. I would hand it to him sideways, muzzle pointing in safe direction and inform him it was fully loaded and the safety on or off. If he asked to retrive it from my holster, I would inform him of the status as well.

  7. #6
    In Utah, when I'm stopped and if carrying, the officer needs to be informed. What I do is show my driver's id and my CCW permit. The officer looks at the permit, asks a few questions (what kind of weapon and where), discusses the traffic violation, then lets me go. I haven't had to show the gun. When respect and courtesy is shown, they usually show respect and courtesy as well.

    Ceicei

  8. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    South Mississippi
    Posts
    91
    That is the same as it happened to me in Mississippi. I heard the Dispach mention to the officer that I had a permit as he was walking up to my truck. When he asked for my license, he also asked to see my permit, asked if I had a weapon and if I did, wanted to know where it was. After telling him I did and pointing to where it was; we made small talk about what kind it was, whether he liked that particular gun and what he carried. He never asked to see it, and also let me off with a warning (for speeding).

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